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Health & FitLGBT People More Likely to Develop Dementia, New Study Finds

02:40  16 july  2019
02:40  16 july  2019 Source:   newsweek.com

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A new study suggests members of the LGBT community are more likely to suffer from dementia and cognitive loss. The study , from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), found that LGBT people were 29 percent more likely to report memory loss, confusion and other symptoms than their

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LGBT People More Likely to Develop Dementia, New Study Finds© Warren Goldswain/Getty The study showed older LGBT adults were 65 percent more likely to not have a partner and 72 percent more likely to not have children when compared to non-LGBT adults living with dementia.

A new study suggests members of the LGBT community are more likely to suffer from dementia and cognitive loss.

The study, from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), found that LGBT people were 29 percent more likely to report memory loss, confusion and other symptoms than their straight, cisgender counterparts.

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The new study confirms both the adverse effect of obesity as well as weight loss caused by metabolic changes during the pre- dementia stage. The study , published in the Alzheimer's & Dementia journal, also found that people near dementia onset, who then go on to develop dementia , tend to

You are twice as likely to develop dementia if you are single 27 October 2017. Being single can almost double the risk for dementia , a new study She said: “It might be because other studies often found that married men on average have healthier lifestyles than single men – such as better diets

More than 44,000 adults between the ages of 45 and 80 were interviewed across nine different states. Only 3 percent of those polled identified as LGBT, but researchers found about one in seven of them reported cognitive issues. On the other hand, only about one in ten straight people reported a decline.

The study also showed LGBT people were nearly 60 percent more likely to live alone and 59 percent more likely to not have a caregiver. LGBT people also reported more problems with daily activities like cooking and cleaning.

"While we do not yet know for certain why sexual or gender minority individuals had higher subjective cognitive decline, we believe it may be due to higher rates of depression, inability to work, high stress, and a lack of regular access to healthcare," lead author Jason Flatt, an assistant professor at the Institute for Health & Aging at UCSF, said in a statement.

LGBT people are at a higher risk for dementia, study says

LGBT people are at a higher risk for dementia, study says A new study suggests that members of the LGBT community are more likely to suffer from dementia and cognitive loss, likely due to social factors. The study published by the University of California, San Francisco found that LGBT people were 29% more likely to report memory loss, confusion and other symptoms than the straight cisgender population. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Black people in the UK are more likely to develop dementia than those from other ethnic groups but are still much less likely to be diagnosed and receive support, a study A review of studies relating smoking and dementia found that (when you remove studies funded by the tobacco industry)

Lonely and depressed singles are 60 percent more likely to develop dementia than happy couples, a new British study has found . “It could be that married couples will try to cope with dementia symptoms before health services are involved.” The study also showed that single people were more

Fiona Carragher, Chief Policy and Research Officer at the Alzheimer's Society in the United Kingdom, agrees.

"There is a chance [cognitive decline] could be related to higher rates of depression, and lack of regular access to healthcare due to discrimination," she told Gay Star News.

According to a 2010 Lambda Legal survey, more than half of all LGBT Americans have reported being discriminated against when seeking healthcare, making LGBT people less likely to see a doctor, let alone get help for early symptoms of cognitive decline.

The research was presented Sunday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles.

"Much too little is known about Alzheimer's disease and dementia in the LGBT community," said AA's chief science officer, Maria C. Carrillo. "In fact, the first data on the prevalence of dementia among sexual and gender minorities was reported only last year.

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An analysis of more than 800,000 people has concluded that people who remain single for life are 42 per cent more likely to get dementia than married couples. The study also found that people who have been widowed are 20 per cent more likely to develop the condition, but that divorcees don’t

A new study shows you are a third more likely to be diagnosed with diseases such as Alzheimer's than those of a healthy weight. Obese people appear to be protected against dementia , with a risk around 30 per cent lower than those of healthy weight. The findings contradict many previous studies

That study, also conducted by Flatt, found that more than 200,000 LGBT people in America live with dementia.

"We need questions asking about sexual orientation and gender identity in national surveys," Flatt said. "Otherwise, how are we going to see how the community does over time?"

Slideshow: 40 habits to reduce your risk of dementia after 40 (Courtesy: Best Life)

LGBT People More Likely to Develop Dementia, New Study Finds

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