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Health & FitLGBT People More Likely to Develop Dementia, New Study Finds

02:40  16 july  2019
02:40  16 july  2019 Source:   newsweek.com

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A study has found that LGBT + people have higher rates of memory loss and confusion, two early signs of dementia . Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, found LGBT + people from the US were 29% more likely to report cognitive impairment than their straight or

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LGBT People More Likely to Develop Dementia, New Study Finds© Warren Goldswain/Getty The study showed older LGBT adults were 65 percent more likely to not have a partner and 72 percent more likely to not have children when compared to non-LGBT adults living with dementia.

A new study suggests members of the LGBT community are more likely to suffer from dementia and cognitive loss.

The study, from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), found that LGBT people were 29 percent more likely to report memory loss, confusion and other symptoms than their straight, cisgender counterparts.

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Experts studied 6,677 people , between the ages of 52 and 90, for six years looking for links between close relationships and conditions like Alzheimer’s And the astonishing results showed that people who are married or live with a partner are less likely to develop dementia , reports the New York Post .

Why worries put you at a greater risk of dementia It found high anxiety sufferers more likely to suffer from cognitive decline Study also found anxiety- dementia relationship stronger in fraternal twins ‘The subjects with anxiety who later developed dementia are people that experience more than

More than 44,000 adults between the ages of 45 and 80 were interviewed across nine different states. Only 3 percent of those polled identified as LGBT, but researchers found about one in seven of them reported cognitive issues. On the other hand, only about one in ten straight people reported a decline.

The study also showed LGBT people were nearly 60 percent more likely to live alone and 59 percent more likely to not have a caregiver. LGBT people also reported more problems with daily activities like cooking and cleaning.

"While we do not yet know for certain why sexual or gender minority individuals had higher subjective cognitive decline, we believe it may be due to higher rates of depression, inability to work, high stress, and a lack of regular access to healthcare," lead author Jason Flatt, an assistant professor at the Institute for Health & Aging at UCSF, said in a statement.

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The study ’s authors say the findings are important for early interventions, as it can take several decades before dementia is diagnosed. “Our findings should give the government even more reason to take mental health issues seriously and to ensure that health provisions are properly resourced.

Fiona Carragher, Chief Policy and Research Officer at the Alzheimer's Society in the United Kingdom, agrees.

"There is a chance [cognitive decline] could be related to higher rates of depression, and lack of regular access to healthcare due to discrimination," she told Gay Star News.

According to a 2010 Lambda Legal survey, more than half of all LGBT Americans have reported being discriminated against when seeking healthcare, making LGBT people less likely to see a doctor, let alone get help for early symptoms of cognitive decline.

The research was presented Sunday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles.

"Much too little is known about Alzheimer's disease and dementia in the LGBT community," said AA's chief science officer, Maria C. Carrillo. "In fact, the first data on the prevalence of dementia among sexual and gender minorities was reported only last year.

LGBT people are at a higher risk for dementia, study says

LGBT people are at a higher risk for dementia, study says A new study suggests that members of the LGBT community are more likely to suffer from dementia and cognitive loss, likely due to social factors. The study published by the University of California, San Francisco found that LGBT people were 29% more likely to report memory loss, confusion and other symptoms than the straight cisgender population. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

The study followed 196,383 people from the age of 64 for about eight years. It analysed people 's The findings may not apply to people with very early onset dementia that starts when people are in "You're still likely to lower your own risk of dementia substantially if you change to a healthy lifestyle.

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that many elderly people are taking daily aspirin to little or no avail. It is well known that high blood pressure is a risk factor for dementia , so the results of a new study from the University of California, Irvine, are quite surprising.

That study, also conducted by Flatt, found that more than 200,000 LGBT people in America live with dementia.

"We need questions asking about sexual orientation and gender identity in national surveys," Flatt said. "Otherwise, how are we going to see how the community does over time?"

Slideshow: 40 habits to reduce your risk of dementia after 40 (Courtesy: Best Life)

LGBT People More Likely to Develop Dementia, New Study Finds

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