Health & Fit: Ground bison meat responsible for E. coli outbreak in 7 states: CDC - PressFrom - US
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Health & FitGround bison meat responsible for E. coli outbreak in 7 states: CDC

20:21  17 july  2019
20:21  17 july  2019 Source:   abcnews.go.com

E. coli outbreak results in another ground beef recall, lawsuit filed against meat producer

E. coli outbreak results in another ground beef recall, lawsuit filed against meat producer A person sickened by eating E. coli tainted ground beef has filed a lawsuit against the meat processor. Also, another beef recall has been announced.

WGS performed on E . coli from ill people in this outbreak showed that they were closely related genetically. This means that the ill people were USDA-FSIS and state regulatory officials collected products for testing at retailers and establishments, and all products tested were negative for E . coli .

Ground beef is the food responsible for a mystery E . coli outbreak involving 109 cases of illness in six states , according to preliminary evidence, the US Centers for Disease Control "Ill people in this outbreak report eating ground beef at home and in restaurants," the CDC said in its outbreak update.

Ground bison meat responsible for E. coli outbreak in 7 states: CDC© USFDA Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. of St. Leonard, Quebec is recalling its Bison Burgers & Bison Ground because they have the potential to be contaminated with E. coli: O121 and O103. Ground bison meat has been linked to an E. colioutbreak in seven states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Twenty-one people in Connecticut, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania have been infected with the E. coli O103 and O121 strains.

Eight of those people were hospitalized, but no deaths or cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, have been reported.

E. coli outbreak: 196 people in 10 states now sick, linked to ground beef

E. coli outbreak: 196 people in 10 states now sick, linked to ground beef The E. coli outbreak linked to ground beef has now sickened 196 people in 10 states, the CDC said Monday. Twenty-eight of them had to be hospitalized.

Multistate e . coli foodborne outbreak investigations are when two are more people get the same illness from the same contaminated food or drink. You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on

An E . coli outbreak affecting 109 people in six states has been traced back to ground beef as the likely source, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( CDC ) said. "A total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strain of E . coli O103 have been reported from six states ," the CDC .

Interviews with the infected people determined that the source was likely meat produced on Feb. 22 and April 30 by Northfork Bison Distributions, Inc., in Quebec, Canada, which was recalled on Tuesday, according to a CDC food safety alert. Those who became sick reported eating bison at both restaurants and their home.

The recalled meat was sold to distributors as ground bison and bison patties, referred to as Bison Burgers or Buffalo Burgers. Recalled ground bison was also sold to retailers in 4-ounce burger patties.

The CDC advised people who may have the recalled ground bison in their home to not consume it and throw it away or return it to the store for a refund.

"Even if some of the recalled patties have been eaten and no one got sick, do not eat them," the press release read.

62,000 pounds of raw meat recalled, just days before Memorial Day

62,000 pounds of raw meat recalled, just days before Memorial Day The USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service says the beef poses an E. coli risk

An E . coli outbreak that the CDC says has reached seven states and sickened 21 people so far has been traced to ground bison meat from Northfork Bison Distributions in Canada’s Quebec province. A new E . coli outbreak that’s hit 7 states traces beyond our borders, FDA and CDC say.

CDC , public health and regulatory officials in several states , and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Eighteen people infected with the outbreak strain of Shiga toxin-producing E . coli O26 were reported from four states . Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that ground beef from Cargill Meat Solutions CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility)

In addition, the CDC recommended that consumers wash and sanitize places where recalled ground bison products were stored, including counter tops and refrigerators drawers or shelves, and also suggested that diners should request that bison burgers be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees when ordering at a restaurant.

Ground bison meat responsible for E. coli outbreak in 7 states: CDC© USFDA Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. of St. Leonard, Quebec is recalling its Bison Burgers & Bison Ground because they have the potential to be contaminated with E. coli: O121 and O103. The CDC also also urged restaurants and retailers to check their freezers and storage for recalled products and to confirm with their suppliers that the ground bison they receive has not be recalled.

Symptoms of an E. coli infection include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea and and vomiting that usually lasts five to seven days. The ailments typically begin three to four days after swallowing the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli germ.

Those who experience symptoms should talk to their healthcare provider, write down what they are in the week prior to becoming sick, report their illness to the health department and assist public health investigators by answering questions about their illness.

ABC News; Ann Reynolds contributed to this report.

After E. Coli Outbreak, CDC Advises Tossing All Lettuce.
Technically, the CDC hasn’t issued a lettuce recall, so consumers really do need to double-check their produce before buying or eating it. It’s also important to note that washing your greens won’t reduce your risk of infection if the mix includes leaves affected by the romaine lettuce outbreak. "This bacteria can actually get inside the lettuce leaf," CDC Outbreak Response and Prevention Branch Chief Ian Williams told CNN. Outbreak Alert: Throw away ALL store-bought romaine lettuce, including whole heads and hearts, chopped, and salad mixes with romaine from Yuma, Arizona growing area.

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