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Health & Fit Autism risk in very young babies may be detected in brain fluid

17:47  10 march  2017
17:47  10 march  2017 Source:   today.com

Doctors May Be Able to Predict Autism Risk Much Earlier

  Doctors May Be Able to Predict Autism Risk Much Earlier Researchers used brain scans to come up with a formula for predicting which babies, from as young as six months old, might be at higher risk of developing autism.Experts say that may be too late in terms of treating or minimizing the effects of autism, since whatever brain changes responsible for them have already taken place. However, a new report in the journal Nature may give worried parents new hope.

New research appears to point to link between vitamin D and autism . New research has found that a vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is linked to an increased risk of autism traits in children. Carried out by a team of researchers at The University of Queensland's Brain Institute with the Erasmus Medical

“Extra brain fluid is also greater than an early marker for autism , Di Martino said. It can also be a mechanism in the construction of autism , and it opens up It Is Usually that you can imagine to predict autism in babies as young as 6 months who have older siblings with the disorder, in keeping with a

Right: MRI of a baby at 6 months who was diagnosed with autism at 2 years. The dark space between the brain folds and skull indicate increased amounts of cerebrospinal fluid. Left: MRI of a baby who was not diagnosed with autism at age 2. Note the decreas © UNC Health Care / UNC School of Medicine Right: MRI of a baby at 6 months who was diagnosed with autism at 2 years. The dark space between the brain folds and skull indicate increased amounts of cerebrospinal fluid. Left: MRI of a baby who was not diagnosed with autism at age 2. Note the decreas It may be possible to predict autism in infants as young as 6 months who have older siblings with the disorder, according to a new study.

Parents of children with autism take note. It may be possible to predict autism in infants as young as 6 months who have older siblings with the disorder, according to a new study by a national network of researchers.

Why Autism Affects Boys More than Girls

  Why Autism Affects Boys More than Girls Researchers have identified one reason why the developmental disorder is more common among boys than among girls While the definition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has changed over the years, one thing has remained relatively constant: the fact that rates of ASD are anywhere from two to five times higher among boys than they are among girls.Until recently, brain experts haven’t focused much on the possible gender-based reasons for this difference. Now, in a report published in JAMA Psychiatry, scientists point to one possible explanation for the discrepancy.

It may be possible to predict autism in infants as young as 6 months who have older siblings with the disorder Infants in such families are at increased risk of developing autism , which is typically diagnosed when a Excess brain fluid may be more than an early marker for autism , Di Martino said.

Autism risk in very young babies may be detected in brain fluid . It may be possible to predict autism in infants as young as 6 months who have older siblings with the disorder, according to a new study. Parents of children with autism take note.

Infants in such families are at increased risk of developing autism, which is typically diagnosed when a child is 2- to 3-years-old and develops symptoms such as challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, delayed speech or nonverbal communication.

Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging — or MRI — to scan the brains of 343 infants when they were 6 months, 12 months and 24 months old. The scans showed that 70 percent of toddlers diagnosed with autism at age 2 had an elevated amount of cerebrospinal fluid around their brains at 6 and 12 months, compared to toddlers who were not diagnosed with autism. Cerebrospinal fluid is a clear, colorless liquid that bathes the brain and spine.

This excess fluid "could possibly be an early biological marker for autism," said Mark Shen, the lead author of the article, published in Biological Psychiatry, and a post-doctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina's Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. Additional studies are needed to confirm the finding, he said.

Could Infections Cause Autism?

  Could Infections Cause Autism? A new study supports the argument that infections during pregnancy may cause some cases of autism. Women who had active infections with genital herpes early in pregnancy were twice as likely to have a child with autism than women who did not, a team of researchers found. © File photo of a pregnant woman. Image: File photo of a pregnant woman The findings, published in the journal mSphere, add to evidence that inflammation during pregnancy may affect the brain of a developing fetus.

It may be possible to detect autism in babies before their first birthdays, a much earlier diagnosis than ever before, a small new study finds. The brain imaging scans, taken at 6 months, at 12 months and again at 2 years, showed significant growth in brain volume during the first year in babies who would

“ Autism can be identified in babies as young as two months, early research suggests,” BBC News reports. Using eye-tracking technology, researchers claim to have The news was based on a small study involving baby boys thought to be at high risk of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) due to them

Such a marker would allow doctors to identify infants at high risk of developing autism before symptoms are present.

"The earlier we can get biological markers for autism, the earlier intervention can be initiated, and the greater the chance of better outcomes, " said David Kennedy, Ph.D., co-director of the Child and Adolescent NeuroDevelopment Initiative at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Typically, therapists work with children and parents to improve eye contact, social interactions and communication skills.

The study results are "very exciting," said Dr. Adriania Di Martino, a professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at NYU Medical School. Excess brain fluid may be more than an early marker for autism, Di Martino said. It may also be a mechanism in the development of autism, and it opens up new possibilities for research, she said. "You can start thinking about conditions that might lead to increased cerebrospinal fluid."

New research appears to point to link between vitamin D and autism

  New research appears to point to link between vitamin D and autism New research has found that a vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is linked to an increased risk of autism traits in children. Carried out by a team of researchers at The University of Queensland's Brain Institute with the Erasmus Medical Centre in The Netherlands, the study analyzed 4229 blood samples from pregnant women and their children who were taking part in the long-term "Generation R" study in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Autism is a complex brain disorder that affects many aspect of child development, including how a kid talks Signs & Symptoms Of Autism In Babies . Communication Problems Babies suffering from this disorder may Nothing Interests Them Autistic babies are very different from any other babies .

Brain scans can detect autism long before any symptoms start to emerge, say scientists. "So it gives us a good target for when the brain differences might be happening for children at high risk of autism ." The study opens up possibilities for big changes in the way autism is treated and diagnosed.

Shen and his colleagues are already looking for genes associated with excess brain fluid. Normally, the liquid, refreshed four times a day, washes away byproducts that build up in the brain. But if the fluid is not flowing properly, these byproducts hang around and cause inflammation, which could "hamper brain development" and lead to autism, said Shen.

Completely different mechanisms may be at work for kids without an older sibling with autism, said Shen and Dimartino. More studies are needed, they said.

Parents with children with autism should not rush to their pediatrician demanding brain MRIs for younger siblings, Shen said.

"We wouldn't recommend that every high-risk infant get an MRI until we know that the accuracy can be improved closer to the 90 percent range" from the current 70 percent, Shen told TODAY.

He and his colleagues are working on improving accuracy by combining their brain fluid findings with other recent research. In addition to flushing out the brain's garbage, brain fluid also delivers signals to the brain that tell it how and when to grow. In a study published last month in Nature, 80 percent of infants diagnosed with autism as toddlers had an increased rate of growth in the surface area of their brains in their first year, compared to toddlers who were not diagnosed with autism.

"We're going to combine those two markers to see if we can improve the prediction closer to the 90 percent range, where it could be really clinically useful," said Shen.

About 1 in 68 children develop autism in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, But as many as 20 out of 100 infants with an older sibling with autism will develop the disorder, said Di Martino.

Study says this may fend off Alzheimer's later in life .
<p>Healthy aging of the brain relies on the health of your heart and blood vessels when you’re younger, a new study reports.</p>People with risk factors for heart disease and stroke in middle age are more likely to have elevated levels of amyloid, a sticky protein known to clump together and form plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers said.

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