Health & Fit: Recreational marijuana legalization reduces opioid deaths by 20%: study - Canada Moves Towards the Legalization of Recreational Cannabis - PressFrom - US
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Health & FitRecreational marijuana legalization reduces opioid deaths by 20%: study

01:51  08 august  2019
01:51  08 august  2019 Source:   msn.com

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A new Economic Inquiry study finds that marijuana access leads to reductions in opioid -related deaths . Investigators found that legalization and access to recreational marijuana reduced annual opioid mortality in the range of 20 % to 35%, with particularly pronounced effects for synthetic opioids .

A new Economic Inquiry study finds that marijuana access leads to reductions in opioid -related deaths . Investigators found that legalization and access to recreational marijuana reduced annual opioid mortality in the range of 20 % to 35%, with particularly pronounced effects for synthetic opioids .

States that legalize recreational marijuana see a reduction of at least 20 percent in fatalities linked to opioid overdoses, according to a study published Wednesday that is likely to be welcomed by the cannabis industry.

Recreational marijuana legalization reduces opioid deaths by 20%: study© Pablo PORCIUNCULA BRUNE The legal status of marijuana has shifted significantly over the past two decades: 10 states and Washington, DC now allow its recreational use (Illinois will follow in January), while 34 states and the federal capital permit medical cannabis treatment

Opioids were responsible for 47,600 overdose deaths in the US in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the crisis was declared a national emergency by President Donald Trump the same year.

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Although certain states in America are making advancements when it comes to both recreational and medical marijuana - and the positive effects the drug can have on people ailing from certain diseases such as Alzheimers, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis - there are plenty of people still opposed to le

A new study concludes that marijuana legalization reduced overdose deaths from prescription opioids in Colorado, but state Throwing all of this into a statistical model, the researchers found a 6.5 percent decrease in monthly opioid deaths after legal recreational marijuana sales began in 2014.

The legal status of marijuana meanwhile has shifted significantly over the past two decades: 10 states and Washington, DC now allow its recreational use and Illinois will follow in January, while 34 states and the federal capital permit medical cannabis treatment.

By comparing rates of overdose deaths before and after legalization, and between states at various points of legalization, the authors of the new paper published in the journal Economic Inquiry found what they called a "causal effect that we identify is highly robust" in opioid mortality reduction.

Their econometric analysis places the reduction in the range of 20 to 35 percent, with the effect particularly pronounced for deaths caused by synthetic opioids like fentanyl, the United States' deadliest drug, according to the latest official data.

Medical marijuana does not lower opioid overdose death rates

Medical marijuana does not lower opioid overdose death rates Some thought people with opioid addiction would turn to medical marijuana instead. It seems they were wrong.

'Medical marijuana legalization covers a small subset of the population, but recreational marijuana legalization expands access by 10-, 20 -, 40-fold His study suggests that access to recreational marijuana reduced opioid deaths on the whole by 21 percent, and prevented 33 percent of deaths

The enactment of marijuana legalization laws is associated with a significant reduction in the number of opioids prescribed and filled, according to a pair of studies published online today in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

"As you know, the opioid epidemic has been surging in recent years," lead author Nathan Chan, an economist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, told AFP.

"So what that means is that everyone's affected, it's just that these states that have legalized are not as adversely affected as those that haven't."

The act of legalizing itself is not what produces the gains -- rather, states that have legal access via dispensaries saw the largest reductions in mortality, Chan and his colleagues Jesse Burkhardt and Matthew Flyr at Colorado State University, wrote.

The study did not look at what factors were at play, but Chan suggested it could be that a growing number of people are self-medicating and "dealing with pain through marijuana use, and therefore they're less likely to take on addictive opioids."

The findings are likely to be welcomed by the nascent legal marijuana industry but also treated with some degree of caution before they are replicated in other studies.

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Twenty -nine states and the District of Columbia currently have laws legalizing marijuana in some form. California has legalized weed for recreational This is the first study to look at the correlation between recreational marijuana and opioid deaths . The study states that their research "extends"

Another day, another round of studies suggesting that legalizing marijuana can help mitigate the The team found “no evidence to support the concern that recreational marijuana legalization 2. Deaths from opioid and heroin overdoses are lower in counties where medical cannabis dispensaries

Some previous work on the topic has even found the opposite result: that cannabis use increases, rather than decreases non-medical prescription opioid use.

Chan however said that these papers, predominantly authored by doctors and not by economists, had failed to adequately differentiate between a positive correlation and causation, an important distinction to uncover given that certain drug users gravitate toward multiple drugs.

Moving forward, Chan said he would like to work on pinpointing the mechanism by which the gains were achieved and test out his substitution theory.

An alternative hypothesis is that marijuana legalization improves a state's economic activity and produces other effects on crime, incarceration, employment, and long-term health, all of which may be linked to opioid overdoses.

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Recreational marijuana legalization reduces opioid deaths by 20%: study
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