Health & Fit: Tips for lowering blood pressure, which may cut dementia risk - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Health & FitTips for lowering blood pressure, which may cut dementia risk

17:26  14 august  2019
17:26  14 august  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

High Cholesterol Linked to Alzheimer's Disease

High Cholesterol Linked to Alzheimer's Disease Scientists believe early-onset Alzheimer’s is associated with cholesterol genes.

Lowering blood pressure to 120 reduces risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, a common precursor to Alzheimer’s, study says. High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart disease, stroke and kidney failure and a growing body of research suggests it may increase risk for dementia .

New Blood Pressure Tipping Point for Dementia . While a link between blood pressure and dementia has been observed for some time, today’s finding — that lowering your systolic blood pressure to 120 reduces dementia risk by 15 percent — represents a major advance as the first

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found a link between high blood pressure and dementia. About one in three American adults have high blood pressure and Dr. Tara Narula says bringing that number down could potentially bring down the number of people suffering from dementia.

"Dementia affects about 10% of Americans over 65," Narula told "CBS This Morning" on Wednesday. "We don't have a lot of great treatments or preventative measures. And a lot of people don't know that hypertension or high blood pressure can be associated with future risk of dementia. And this is something that's potentially modifiable."

Which Wards Off Dementia: Brain-Boosting Supplements or Good Old Exercise?

Which Wards Off Dementia: Brain-Boosting Supplements or Good Old Exercise? The World Health Organization sought to answer the question. Should you save your cash?

People who lowered their blood pressure to under 120mmHg lowered their risk of both mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the gateway to dementia , or probable dementia by 15 Williamson notes that the study did not confirm that lowering blood pressure can lower risk of dementia , but that may be

Lowering blood pressure did not significantly reduce dementia risk , but the secondary results showed a significant reduction in MCI, according to the study published Monday. " Dementia continues to be a large public health challenge, and based on the primary results of this study, we still have yet

Narula said the study followed about 4,800 Americans for 24 years and looked at blood pressure patterns.

"They found two patterns that were associated with an increased risk of dementia," Narula said. "The first was when you had high pressure in midlife, which is 50s to 60s, that persisted into your later life. The second pattern was if you had high pressure in midlife but then developed very low blood pressure inlater years. And by low I mean less than 90 over 60."

Narula said those findings highlight the importance that hypertension is potentially modifiable.

"We can really make a huge public health impact by controlling this," Narula said. "We need to be starting this early, in your 40s and 50s. And as far as the older population is concerned, we do need to kind of do more research to figure out what is the ideal blood pressure when you get older."

Nearly half of older people worry about dementia. Few talk to a doctor

Nearly half of older people worry about dementia. Few talk to a doctor How to discuss dementia fears early

Lifestyle changes can significantly reduce high blood pressure and even lower your risk for hypertension in the future. Here’s 17 ways to Plus, you’ll lower your risk for other medical problems. A 2016 review of several studies reported that weight loss diets reduced blood pressure by an

Bottom Line: Most guidelines for lowering blood pressure recommend lowering sodium intake. However, that recommendation might make the most sense for people who are Several studies have explored how reducing stress can help lower blood pressure . Here are two evidence-based tips to try

So what can you do to control your blood pressure? The first step is finding out what your blood pressure numbers are.

"You have to start getting screened early," Narula said. "We actually tell people in your 20s you should start getting screened. You should know what your numbers are, have that very close relationship with your doctor where if you do have high blood pressure getting checked often."

Lifestyle changes like reducing salt consumption, increasing potassium, exercising, controlling your weight and cutting down on or quitting alcohol consumption and smoking can also help. Taking any medications you're prescribed is key as well.

"High blood pressure is asymptomatic for a lot of people," Narula said. "You feel well and so you think, 'I don't really have high blood pressure' or 'Maybe I had it one time, but now I'm fine. I don't need to take my medications.' But what it's doing is it's damaging, that increased pressure is damaging all the blood vessels that supply blood throughout your body."

How to deal with a major health problem among minorities: Stroke

How to deal with a major health problem among minorities: Stroke Getting the family involved is part of the solution.

But it might lower the risk of slight declines in thinking and memory, a condition known as mild cognitive impairment, the researchers added. High blood pressure affects more than three-fourths of people over age 65, and it has been identified as a potential risk factor for MCI and dementia in

Aggressive treatment to lower blood pressure in older people has been shown to cut the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, a risk factor for dementia , US researchers said Monday. While the findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)

And that damage can lead to a myriad of problems.

"It's associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. Stroke, heart attack, heart failure, vision loss, sexual dysfunction," Narula said. "Anywhere there's an artery in your body that's seeing high pressure, there's a potential to damage those cells."

Tips for lowering blood pressure, which may cut dementia risk© Hero Images/Getty Images

Controlling blood pressure may help ward off dementia.
Keeping your blood pressure under control "may be a key to your future brain health," researchers say

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!