Health & Fit: Decision expected in landmark opioid trial against Big Pharma - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Health & FitDecision expected in landmark opioid trial against Big Pharma

16:50  26 august  2019
16:50  26 august  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

Powerful opioid lollipop was illegally marketed, ex-pharma rep says

Powerful opioid lollipop was illegally marketed, ex-pharma rep says Fearing patients would die, a former pharmaceutical rep went undercover for FDA investigators to stop the illegal "off-label" promotion of an opioid lollipop

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma LP and two other drugmakers on Friday lost a bid to delay a landmark trial set for May in a multibillion-dollar lawsuit by Oklahoma’s attorney general accusing them of helping fuel an opioid abuse and overdose epidemic in the state.

Federal prosecutors target Big Pharma in opioid crisis 02:11. As for Oklahoma, the state ranked seventh in the nation for prescription pain reliever abuse The trial is expected to lay a road map for other states and municipalities in holding drugmakers accountable for what Hunter told the court was

A ruling in a landmark legal case over the opioid crisis could lead to one of the biggest monetary awards in U.S. history.

A judge in Oklahoma will decide today if Johnson & Johnson bears responsibility for helping to fuel the state's opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing painkillers. Oklahoma is asking for $17.2 billion.

This is the first such case against a drugmaker to go to trial, and it could set a precedent for cases across the country. Depending on how the judge rules, it could give lawyers a new strategy for holding large corporations accountable.

Data shows flood of opioids across US, many of them generics

Data shows flood of opioids across US, many of them generics The maker of OxyContin has been cast as the chief villain in the nation's opioid crisis. But newly released government figures suggest Purdue Pharma had plenty of help in flooding the U.S. with billions of pills even as overdose deaths were accelerating. 

The first civil trial that could hold a drug company responsible for the US opioid epidemic began Tuesday in Oklahoma -- a landmark case that could impact thousands of others like it. The bench trial pits the state of Oklahoma against Johnson & Johnson.

The first civil trial that could end up holding a drug company responsible for the US opioid epidemic began Tuesday in Oklahoma, in a landmark case that might impact thousands of others like it. The bench trial pits the state of Oklahoma against Johnson & Johnson.

Decision expected in landmark opioid trial against Big Pharma© Credit: CBSNews cbsn-fusion-first-major-opioid-trial-takes-aim-at-pharmaceutical-giant-johnson-johnson-thumbnail-1860098-640x360.jpg For weeks, the state of Oklahoma has argued that Johnson & Johnson and its pharmaceutical subsidiary Janssen helped create a "public nuisance" by intensely marketing opioid painkillers while downplaying the risk of addiction.

"This is very personal to all of us," said state attorney Reggie Whitten. "My partner lost a niece to this opioid epidemic. I lost my firstborn son to the opioid epidemic."

The 2017 filing named multiple defendants. Purdue Pharma and Teva Pharmaceuticals USA settled out of court for a combined total of $355 million, without admitting wrongdoing.

As the nation's opioid crisis grew, the pills got stronger

As the nation's opioid crisis grew, the pills got stronger An Associated Press analysis of drug distribution data released as a result of lawsuits against the industry also found that the amount of opioids as measured by total potency continued to rise early this decade even as the number of pills distributed began to dip. The reason: Doctors were prescribing — and the industry was supplying — stronger pills. "It shows it wasn't just the number of pills being shipped that increased. The actual amount of opioids being prescribed and consumed went up," said Anna Lembke, a Stanford University professor who researches opioids and is serving as a paid expert witness for plaintiffs in the litigation.

The bench trial pits the state of Oklahoma against Johnson & Johnson. Two other drug companies named in the lawsuit settled ahead of the trial . Oklahoma has accused the three drug makers of deceptively marketing opioid painkillers, hyping their effectiveness and downplaying the risks of

Purdue Pharma and the state of Oklahoma have agreed to a 0 million settlement in a lawsuit that claims the illegal marketing of OxyContin helped lead to the The deal could influence the thousands of lawsuits facing opioid companies across the country. Nearly every state has filed lawsuits against

But Johnson & Johnson and Janssen decided to go to trial.

"When you're right, you fight," said their attorney, Sabrina Strong, a partner at O'Melveny and Myers. "And that's what you're seeing here. We have sympathy for those who suffer from substance abuse. But Janssen did not cause the opioid crisis in this country."

Johnson & Johnson says its opioid products account for less than one percent of the Oklahoma market. But the state disputes that.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter told CBS News correspondent Omar Villafranca, "They made money whether they sold their drugs or when somebody else sold opioids, because they were supplying everybody else. And this 'one percent' thing, that's a complete canard."

If the judge rules against Johnson & Johnson, the "public nuisance" argument that was previously used successfully to fight Big Tobacco could possibly be used in opioid lawsuits set to go to trial in Ohio this fall.

"Thousands of people being addicted to prescription opioids, thousands of people  dying, you've a public nuisance, you've got harm that's occurring," said Hunter.

Both sides in Oklahoma say they'll appeal if the judge rules against them.

In addition to the cases in Ohio, suits were filed last week in West Virginia accusing Johnson & Johnson, as well as Teva, of misrepresenting the risks of their opioid products.

Read More

Opioid Crisis Cost U.S. Economy $631 Billion in Four Years, Study Shows .
The report examines the cost of opioid misuse on a variety of areas, including health care expenditures and law enforcement.The report, authored by Stoddard Davenport, MPH; Alexandra Weaver, ASA, MAAA and Matt Caverly, examines the cost of opioid misuse on a variety of areas, including health care expenditures, law enforcement and criminal justice programs and early mortality.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!