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Health & Fit The Joker's Uncontrollable Laughing Is Actually a Real-Life Medical Condition

22:00  04 october  2019
22:00  04 october  2019 Source:   menshealth.com

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In Joker , Todd Phillips' newly imagined origin story for the infamous DC villain, Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a downtrodden man who erupts into uncontrollable laughter And while the script never names the Joker ' s disorder, it's based on a real - life medical condition called pseudobulbar affect.

Here‘s the Real Disorder Behind Joker ' s Uncontrollable Laugh . One of these illnesses causes Fleck to uncontrollably laugh at inappropriate times, leading him to carry an informational card that explains the condition to people who may be near him during an episode.

In Joker, Todd Phillips' newly imagined origin story for the infamous DC villain, Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a downtrodden man who erupts into uncontrollable laughter at the most inappropriate moments. As the film progresses, the audience learns that his outbursts are the symptom of a brain injury. And while the script never names the Joker's disorder, it's based on a real-life medical condition called pseudobulbar affect (PBA).

a person brushing the teeth with a toothbrush in the mouth: In 'Joker', Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a man with pseudobulbar affect, a real medical condition that causes uncontrollable outbursts of laughter.© Warner Bros. In 'Joker', Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a man with pseudobulbar affect, a real medical condition that causes uncontrollable outbursts of laughter.

PBA is characterized by frequent, involuntary bouts of crying, laughter, or other emotional displays, which are exaggerated or disconnected from the individual's actual emotional state. It's most commonly caused by brain injuries or neurological disorders that impact how the brain processes emotion.

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In Joker , Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, who laughs uncontrollably . The condition isn’t named, but it’ s based on a real disorder called Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) is a condition that causes episodes of sudden, uncontrollable and inappropriate episodes of crying or laughing , according to

The Joker ' s maniacal laughter stands for the unbridled menace in the DC comic book universe, but Todd Phillips' Joker adds a layer of health challenges behind Some common symptoms associated with the condition include: frequent, involuntary and uncontrollable outbursts of crying or laughing

According to the Mayo Clinic, people who have PBA will feel and experience emotion in much the same way as anybody else, but they're prone to expressing it in an "exaggerated or inappropriate way," and these outbursts can last for several minutes. Laughter can often turn into tears, and because uncontrollably crying is such a common symptom of PBA, it's often mistaken for depression—which is actually also very common for sufferers of this condition.

Phoenix's portrayal of a character battling mental illness, and his frustration in being denied the treatment he needs, has been praised by critics and described as a timely commentary on the way many Americans struggle to access mental health services. However, ultimately this nuanced characterization gives way to violence, in a manner which some have said scapegoats mental illness.

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In Joker , the latest film from Todd Phillips that opened October 4 and stars Joaquin Phoenix as the titular character, the villain’ s origins are once again explored with a darker twist that deviates far from past iterations of his backstory. Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a.

But is the Joker ' s laughing condition a disorder that affects people in real life ? While Joker doesn't name Fleck's condition , nor any of the mental illnesses he's been medicated for, there is a real disorder that can cause fits of uncontrollable laughter.

"What could have made Joker a good film for 2019 would have been a better focus on the mental health issues it only briefly explores," writes Herb Scribner, who believes that the film's descent into violence "distracts from what could be a serious conversation about mental health."

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"It’s hard not to have sympathy for somebody who experienced that level of childhood trauma," Joaquin Phoenix said of the character. "An overstimulated medulla looks for and perceives danger everywhere. For someone in that state, does it mean his actions make sense or are justified? Obviously not. There’s a point where he crosses the line where I am no longer able to stick by his side. But it allowed me to approach him with less judgment and more compassion than what I had when I first read the script."

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Laughing Is Actually a Real - Life Medical Condition .A depiction of traumatic brain injury (TBI) with gelastic seizures in " Joker "(2019). In ' Joker ', Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a man with pseudobulbar affect, a real medical condition that causes uncontrollable outbursts of laughter.

In ' Joker ', Joaquin Phoenix plays Arthur Fleck, a man with pseudobulbar affect, a real medical condition that causes uncontrollable outbursts of laughter. What others are saying. The Joker ' s Uncontrollable Laughing Is Actually a Real - Life Medical Condition .A depiction of traumatic brain

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