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Health & Fit 8 Reasons to Request an Earlier Mammogram

00:40  09 october  2019
00:40  09 october  2019 Source:   thehealthy.com

Male breast cancer screening in high-risk patients extremely successful, study says

Male breast cancer screening in high-risk patients extremely successful, study says Mammograms are more effective at detecting breast cancer in high-risk men than in women who are at average risk of developing the disease, and could provide potentially lifesaving early detection of male breast cancer. © Shutterstock Doctor consulting male patient, working on diagnostic examination on men's health disease or mental illness, while writing on prescription record information document in clinic or hospital office; Shutterstock ID 735156682 That's according to a new study researchers are calling the "first of its kind" and the largest review in the United States of the medical records of men who have had a screenin

Experts recommend you start mammograms at 45; however, there are some factors that may make you want to start breast cancer screening earlier . Here’s a look at some of the reasons why you might want to consider requesting yearly mammograms even earlier than that.

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Conflicting guidelines exist among various U.S. and international organizations about the appropriate age for people to begin getting regular mammograms. As a result, there's a bit of a gray area when it comes to what doctors recommend for their patients.

a person posing for the camera: A social media post that went viral featured one woman's only symptom of breast cancer—a small dimple on the edge of her breast. This is one sign of a tumor that you could overlook in a monthly self exam. © lovelyday12/Shutterstock

A social media post that went viral featured one woman's only symptom of breast cancer—a small dimple on the edge of her breast. This is one sign of a tumor that you could overlook in a monthly self exam. "Very subtle dimples underneath that could easily be missed when we're all rushing round getting ready in a morning," writes the woman who shared the picture on her Facebook page, Lisa Royle, from Manchester, UK.  Anita Johnson, MD, medical director of breast surgical oncology at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Atlanta, agrees. "Any dimpling or retraction of skin on your breast should be checked by your doctor."

Jennifer Garner Shares a Video of Her Mammogram Appointment for Breast Cancer Awareness

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The pros and cons of whether thermography is truly the perfect alternative to cancer causing mammograms with high levels of ionizing radiation. As early as 1928, physicians were warned to handle “cancerous breasts with care– for fear of accidentally disseminating cells” and spreading cancer.

"The underlying evidence supporting the use of screening mammography stems from nine randomized trials that began between 1963-1991 in the United States, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and Canada and studied women at average risk for breast cancer," explains Kristi Funk, MD, FACS, breast cancer surgeon and medical director at Pink Lotus Breast Center. "However, that data is now decades old and new advances in the field of breast cancer detection and treatment have caused experts to question whether or not the guidelines deserve a makeover."

The American Cancer Society currently suggests that women of normal risk begin annual mammography at 45. Here's a look at some of the reasons why you might want to consider requesting yearly mammograms even earlier than that. And be sure you know the everyday habits that reduce your breast cancer risk.

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  Lisa Rinna Just Flaunted Her Insanely Sculpted Abs—And Fans Can't Believe She's 56 The "Real Housewives of Beverly Hills" star shared two photos on Instagram for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the entire internet is talking about her six pack. © Instagram/lisarinna Real Housewives of Beverly Hills's Lisa Rinna stripped down to her underwear in two Instagram posts that she shared for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In the first photo, the 56-year-old snapped a mirror selfie in her closet, where you get a full shot of her sculpted abs. Is she flexing? Maybe, but who the heck cares because the reality star looks so toned. "???? Both my Mom and my sister are breast cancer survivors.

Who Profits from Early Mammogram Screening? While breast cancer screenings are ultimately up to the individual, many women face a lot of pushback from personal health care providers. You’ve probably heard horror stories of doctors telling female patients that they can’t be their doctor unless

It can detect early stage breast changes without emitting radiation. It may also be useful in A doctor will often request an MRI and biopsy to evaluate abnormal ultrasound results further. For instance, a person may have an ultrasound after a suspicious finding on a mammogram and then undergo an

You have a personal history of breast cancer

Even if you didn't have full-blown breast cancer, but a high-risk lesion was found via biopsy from your breast, you should be getting mammograms earlier than the recommended age of 45 for average-risk women. "Specifically, women who have had a breast biopsy that shows precancerous cells (specifically, atypia or LCIS) should request an earlier mammogram," says Dr. Funk.

You have a family history of breast cancer

A woman's risk of breast cancer nearly doubles if she has a first-degree female relative who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. First degree means your mother, sister, or daughter. If two of those first-degree relatives have been diagnosed with breast cancer, your risk rises to 60 percent, or five times higher than average. Researchers also know that your risk also goes up if a brother or father has been diagnosed, although they are not sure the exact increase in risk posed by this circumstance. Add these foods to your plate to help lower your risk of breast cancer.

Why aren't more women getting mammograms?

  Why aren't more women getting mammograms? Is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month working?Launched in 1985, the month is focused on increasing awareness of the disease and promoting mammography to help women find breast cancer at its earliest, most treatable stages.

Screening exams can detect cancer early , when it’s most treatable. MD Anderson recommends women at average risk for breast cancer begin annual mammograms at

There are a few reasons why a woman would be called back for more images after a mammogram . Vary rarely, the images are of poor quality or have an artifact on them. This doesn't happen often because the mammographer checks her images before she lets the patient leave.

You know of genetic mutations in your family

There are many gene mutations that have a link to cancer, but the most common for breast cancer are BRCA1 and BRCA2. "On average, women with a BRCA1 mutation have up to a 72 percent lifetime risk of developing breast cancer and 69 percent risk for women with a BRCA2 mutation," says Dr. Elliott. "Breast cancer that is positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women." Experts recommend that anyone with these mutations be monitored carefully and discuss risk with a doctor who specializes in breast cancer.

You were exposed to radiation therapy between ages 10 and 30

Research published in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network has linked exposure to ionizing radiation as one of the key risk factors for the development of breast cancer. Much of the data come from the study of atomic bomb survivors as well as women who were exposed to medical radiation for either diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. If you were exposed to radiation for any reason during the ages 10 to 30, discuss it with your doctor to determine the ideal age to start mammograms. Don't believe these myths about breast cancer.

Oklahoma news anchor diagnosed with breast cancer after streaming first-ever mammogram on Facebook Live

  Oklahoma news anchor diagnosed with breast cancer after streaming first-ever mammogram on Facebook Live An Oklahoma journalist who chose to air her first-ever mammogram on Facebook Live was subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer, she said. © KFOR via Fox NewsIn October 2018, Ali Meyer, a reporter with Oklahoma’s News 4 (KFOR), chose to live-stream her mammogram “because I thought it might remind some women to schedule theirs,” she wrote in an essay posted to the news station’s website. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Mammography : Aurora recommends women at average risk for breast cancer have a mammogram at least once every two years beginning at age 40. If you’re at high risk for breast cancer (for example, if breast cancer runs in your family), you may need to start having mammograms at an earlier age or

Mammograms at ARC. 2D and 3D mammography screenings are conducted in a comfortable imaging suite with a private changing area and waiting room. Digital mammography also uses less radiation than traditional 2D film mammography , reducing a woman’s lifetime exposure to radiation associated

There's a history of cancer in your family

The lifetime risk of developing cancer over the course of your life is about 1 in 3, according to the American Cancer Society, which explains why most people have a family member who's been diagnosed with cancer. But if there happens to be a great deal of cancer in your family—what seems like more than usual—it's worth mentioning it to your doctor to see if you qualify for an earlier mammogram. "Particularly, if you have two or more family members on the same side with breast, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, melanoma, uterine, colon, and/or stomach cancers, you should request an earlier mammogram," says Dr. Funk.

You have dense breasts

Dense breast tissue is quite common, and researchers have unfortunately linked it to an increased risk of larger tumors or more advanced cancer at diagnosis. Dense breast tissue can make it more difficult to detect problems on a mammogram, which is why women at high risk and/or with dense breasts may benefit from a more sensitive test: breast MRI. "Unfortunately, we've seen women skip their MRI and then get diagnosed down the road," says Dr. Elliott. "We always wonder if it could have been caught earlier and if they could have avoided chemotherapy." These are the foods cancer docs warn against eating.

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You notice a lump that doesn't go away

It's not uncommon for women—especially young women who are still experiencing a monthly menstrual cycle—to notice a lump in the breast. This is even more likely if you are breastfeeding, as the breast tissue is constantly changing due to milk production. Most of the time there is nothing to worry about and the lump goes away on its own. However, if you notice a palpable breast lump that doesn't go away with your menstrual cycle (if you still have cycles), Tara Shirazian, MD, a gynecologist at NYU Langone Health, recommends requesting a mammogram.

You experience nipple discharge or changes on the skin

Nipple discharge is a not uncommon symptom in women with breast cancer. In fact, it is the third most common symptom after breast pain and the presence of a lump, according to research published in Radiologia Brasileira. If you notice nipple discharge that is persistent and especially if it is one-sided, schedule an appointment with your primary care physician or gynecologist who may recommend that you schedule an earlier mammogram. Experiencing breast pain? Here are 10 potential reasons why.

How can you find out your risk?

One in eight (12 percent) women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime. To determine whether you're at average or increased risk, The American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) recommends undergoing formal risk assessment for breast cancer between ages 25-30 and the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) advise all women to undergo risk assessment at age 30, explains Nancy Elliott of Montclair Breast Center. "These results help women and their physicians determine when they should start screening—and what type of screening they'll need," she says. "High-risk women may need to be screened earlier and should consider supplementary screening, such as ultrasound or MRI (in addition to annual 3D mammography)."

Gallery: 15 Breast Cancer Signs and Symptoms (Provided by Mom.com)

Cropped group of multi-ethnic teenage girls and young women holding breast cancer awareness ribbons in their hands, and wearing pink shirts.

The post 8 Reasons to Request an Earlier Mammogram appeared first on The Healthy.

Google's AI Bested Doctors in Detecting Breast Cancer in Mammograms .
Working with medical experts, engineers at Google Health have created an AI model that lowers false positive and false negative rates for mammogram breast cancer screeningAI could play a role in accomplishing that—computer-based machine learning might help doctors to read mammograms more accurately. In a study published Jan. 1 in Nature, researchers from Google Health, and from universities in the U.S. and U.K., report on an AI model that reads mammograms with fewer false positives and false negatives than human experts. The algorithm, based on mammograms taken from more than 76,000 women in the U.K. and more than 15,000 in the U.S.

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