Health & Fit: Sarah Silverman Talks Needing to 'Be Funny to Survive' in New Documentary About Mental Health - Sarah Hyland (Modern Family): health problems, suicide ... her touching confidences - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Sarah Silverman Talks Needing to 'Be Funny to Survive' in New Documentary About Mental Health

00:50  12 october  2019
00:50  12 october  2019 Source:   people.com

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In a new trailer for the upcoming documentary , It’s Not That Funny , a handful of comedians open up about struggling with mental health problems — and how “100 percent of comedians become comedians because somewhere in their childhood they needed to be funny in order to survive .”

Released on Mental Health Awareness Day, the documentary presented by Funny or Die is the brainchild of digital “One-hundred percent of comedians become comedians because somewhere in their childhood, they needed to be funny in order to survive ,” Silverman says in the documentary .

Just because comedians are laughing on stage doesn’t mean they are smiling behind the curtain.

In Laughing Matters, a new 30-minute documentary, 12 comedians speak candidly about their mental health struggles, showing that there are often dark lows lurking beneath the highs of comedic performance.

To help start the conversation, Sarah Silverman, 48, opens up about her battle with depression.

“All of us learn a skill set inherently as children that gets us through childhood,” says Sarah Silverman. “One hundred percent of comedians become comedians because somewhere in their childhood they needed to be funny in order to survive.”

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Comedian Sarah Silverman says she used humor as a tool to " survive " her childhood in the new documentary "Laughing Matters." SoulPancake. "Comedians become comedians because somewhere in their childhood, they needed to be funny in order to survive " — Sarah Silverman .

Sarah Silverman Says Comedians Use Laughter to ' Survive ' in New Documentary It’s Not That Funny . In a new trailer for the upcoming documentary , It’s Not That Funny , a handful of comedians open up about struggling with mental health problems — and how they’ve used comedy as an

Sarah Silverman posing for a picture: Sarah Silverman Talks Needing to 'Be Funny to Survive' in New Documentary About Mental Health© Provided by Meredith Corporation Sarah Silverman Talks Needing to 'Be Funny to Survive' in New Documentary About Mental Health

Silverman reveals that she was put on Xanax to help with anxiety and depression when she was 13 years old.

“They just upped the dose … until I was taking four Xanax four times a day,” she shares.

“The psychiatrist who originally put me on it hung himself,” she adds. “I mean, I can’t just skate by that — it’s crazy.”

Silverman says many comedians try to find humor in their darkest moments. “These years of torture and shame kind of became my superpower. I think all of us kind of romanticized depression to a degree.”

Sarah Silverman sitting on a bench posing for the camera: Faye Sadou/MediaPunch© Faye Sadou/MediaPunch Faye Sadou/MediaPunch

Now streaming on YouTube, the documentary from SoulPancake and Funny or Die also features comedians Anna Akana, Rachel Bloom, Chris Gethard, Wayne Brady, Rainn Wilson and more.

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Sarah Silverman has revealed she was taking sixteen Xanax pills a day as a teen. The successful comedian opens up about her battle with anxiety in a new 'All those things feed into how I became a comedian, because I needed to be funny to be liked. One hundred percent of comedians become

Sarah Silverman has revealed that as a teenager she dealt with depression and to help her get through she was prescribed Xanax, taking up to “I was put on Xanax at 13,” the 48-year-old comedian shared in a new documentary called “Laughing Matters: The Funny Business of Being Sad,” according to

Brady says most comedians have been taught to keep quiet about their struggles, no matter how much pain they may be experiencing.

“If I complain, strike me down!” he says.

Rainn Wilson admits that he expresses his pain through the characters he portrays on screen.

“Here I am, this really ungainly, insecure kid, feeling generally unloved and unlovable through most of my life,” he says. You see some of that Rainn Wilson trauma in the character of Dwight [Schrute on The Office].”

Rainn Wilson, Rainn Wilson are posing for a picture: Paul Drinkwater/NBCU Photo Bank; Santiago Felipe/Getty© Paul Drinkwater/NBCU Photo Bank; Santiago Felipe/Getty Paul Drinkwater/NBCU Photo Bank; Santiago Felipe/Getty

“I felt dead,” says Anna Akana. “The only thing that made me feel alive was trying to make people laugh.”

But laughter isn’t always the best medicine.

“Comedy is not going to save you,” says Chris Gethard. “And if you are thinking about doing comedy as a substitute for therapy, it doesn’t work. I tried.”

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Laughing Matters, a new minidocumentary on comedy and mental health released today (World Mental Health Day) on YouTube, begins in "100 percent of comedians become comedians because, somewhere in their childhood, they needed to be funny in order to survive ," says Sarah Silverman

On Thursday, the 45-year-old spoke about his experiences on The Project for World Mental Health Day, saying he wants people to know 'there is help out there'. 'The way you're feeling right now - even thought your brain is telling you this is how it's going to be forever, it's not!' he said.

Silverman eventually realized that she had to prioritize her mental health. “There’s nothing more important to me than being funny than being well,” she says.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text “home” to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

Gallery: Physical Symptoms of Anxiety No One Talks About (Provided by The Active Times)

a person lying on a bed: Contrary to what some may believe, anxiety isn’t something that just happens in your head. Anxiety refers to a very real mental health condition — and for many, it is experienced on both a mental and physiological level. The term “anxiety” is often used flippantly, but in reality anxiety is a condition that should be diagnosed by a mental health professional. There’s a big difference between feeling the effects of an anxiety disorder and feeling occasional stress. Stress is often in reaction to a life change or other trigger; symptoms of anxiety sometimes develop in response to those things, but can also occur at random. These symptoms can be difficult to manage and can hugely affect the quality of a person’s life. Some of the symptoms of anxiety are more well-known — especially the ones related to thoughts and emotions. It is not uncommon, for instance, for a person with anxiety to worry excessively or experience irritability and mood swings. However, some symptoms of anxiety are more physical. Here are a few you may not know about.

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