Health & Fit: How Blue Halloween Buckets Have Become an Unofficial Symbol for Autism - Autism: asperger, definition, symptom, what you need to know about this disorder - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit How Blue Halloween Buckets Have Become an Unofficial Symbol for Autism

22:10  17 october  2019
22:10  17 october  2019 Source:   housebeautiful.com

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With a simple Facebook post, Alicia Plumer sparked a movement. In October 2018, the Louisiana resident wrote shared an update on the social network, letting people know that her autistic son would be trick-or-treating with a blue bucket. With more than 12,000 likes and 28,000 shares, the blue Halloween bucket quickly became a social media symbol for the autistic community celebrating the holiday.

In October 2018, Alice Plumer wrote a Facebook post about her adult autistic son trick-or-treating with a blue Halloween bucket. Blue Halloween buckets quickly became a symbol across social media for the autistic community celebrating October 31.© insjoy - Getty Images In October 2018, Alice Plumer wrote a Facebook post about her adult autistic son trick-or-treating with a blue Halloween bucket. Blue Halloween buckets quickly became a symbol across social media for the autistic community celebrating October 31.

“Trick or Treat....the BLUE BUCKET,” Plumer wrote on Facebook. “If you see someone who appears to be an adult dressed up to trick or treat this year carrying this blue bucket, he’s our son!”

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She continued: “His name is BJ, & he is autistic. While he has the body of a 21-year-old, he loves Halloween. Please help us keep his spirit alive & happy. So when you see the blue bucket, share a piece of candy. Spread awareness! These precious people are not ‘too big’ to trick or treat.”

Autism is a spectrum disorder: Each person has different strengths and challenges when it comes to their social skills, behavior, and speech, according to Autism Speaks. In the context of Halloween, people giving out candy may not hear "trick-or-treat" or "Happy Halloween" from an autistic child or adult, but the blue Halloween bucket is meant to bridge that gap.

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Although the blue Halloween buckets have caught traction on social media, they are not the official symbol of trick-or-treaters with autism. Instead, Autism Speaks told WKYC.com that parents should consider putting a badge on their children or carry a sign letting others know.

It’s also important not to confuse the blue Halloween buckets with the Teal Pumpkin Project—focused on highlighting homes that are safe from food allergies.

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This is interesting!