Health & Fit: The Link Between Sleep and Breast Cancer - Alcohol and breast cancer: too many women ignore this link - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit The Link Between Sleep and Breast Cancer

21:35  18 october  2019
21:35  18 october  2019 Source:   shape.com

Local Girls Take Part In Pink Lemonade Stand Challenge For Breast Cancer Research

Local Girls Take Part In Pink Lemonade Stand Challenge For Breast Cancer Research A group of local kids are standing up to breast cancer and they are doing it with pink lemonade. © Provided by CBS Local, a division of CBS Radio Inc In 2016, Brynne Rhodes, whose mother was battling breast cancer, wanted to do something to help find a cure so she did it the best way she knew how; with pink lemonade. She set up a pink lemonade stand to raise money for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.  Rhodes is now challenging kids from all over the country to do the same this summer and take on the pink lemonade stand challenge. A group of kids from Miami accepted her challenge.

You probably know sleep is important for mood, appetitite, and crushing your workouts—but bad sleep hygiene can have more serious consequences. What time you hit the pillow and how restful your shut-eye is can affect your breast cancer risk, new research shows. Disruptions of your circadian rhythm, which can result from poor sleep, may play a role in breast cancer.

a person lying on a bed: What time you hit the pillow and how restful your shut-eye is can affect your breast cancer risk, new research shows. Here’s how to sleep better and protect your health.© Sophie Filippova/Getty Images What time you hit the pillow and how restful your shut-eye is can affect your breast cancer risk, new research shows. Here’s how to sleep better and protect your health.

“Factors like light or noise can suppress melatonin at night, when levels are supposed to be high. The body responds by releasing estrogen from the ovaries at times of day it normally wouldn’t,” says Carla Finkielstein, Ph.D., an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. In some cases, the constant, unscheduled release of hormones like this could increase cancer risk.

Breast cancer risk reduced by swapping red meat for poultry, study finds

Breast cancer risk reduced by swapping red meat for poultry, study finds Heads up, ladies: Consider swapping chicken for red meat the next time you have the choice, as doing so may reduce the risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests. © Provided by Fox News Network LLC The study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, followed the “meat and meat cooking practices” of more than 42,000 women for an average of roughly eight years. By the end, researchers women who ate the most amount of red meat had an estimated 23 percent higher risk of developing breast cancer than those who ate the least amount of red meat.

Occasional bad nights are nothing to worry about, but anything that throws off your z’s chronically is. These three tips will help you get the nightly rest you need.

Shut down disruptions.

Waking up more than twice a night is associated with a 21 percent increase in the risk of breast cancer, new research in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention shows. Fragmented sleep changes the white blood cells in a way that promotes tumor growth, according to an earlier study in mice, says Dorraya El-Ashry, Ph.D., the chief scientific officer of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Take steps to make your sleep more peaceful. If you live on a noisy street, for instance, consider getting a pink noise machine. (Pink noise is similar to white noise but has been proved to boost sleep quality.) If you often wake up with a sore throat or neck pain, you may snore; 88 percent of women do, but only 72 percent know it. Changing your sleeping position, getting a new pillow, or wearing a mouth guard can help; ask your doctor or dentist for advice. (Related: Study Finds That 'Beauty Sleep' Is Actually a Real Thing)

Scientists Turn Breast Cancer Cells Into Fat, Stops Disease From Spreading, Report Says

Scientists Turn Breast Cancer Cells Into Fat, Stops Disease From Spreading, Report Says Their research found that treating the test subjects with a diabetic drug (rosiglitazone) and a cancer treatment (trametinib) triggered the amazing cell change. 'Scientists Successfully Turn Breast Cancer Cells Into Fat to Stop Them From Spreading' https://t.co/daL2uUjn22 Paper: https://t.co/UA2dPcaKiGpic.twitter.com/3FqA7RxEAW — Stem Cell Foundation (@AusStemCell) August 13, 2019 “A combination of rosiglitazone and trametinib efficiently inhibits cancer cell invasion, dissemination, and metastasis formation in various preclinical mouse models of breast cancer,” the team declared in the medical journal Cancer Cell.

Stick to this two-hour window.

Studies have indicated that a rotating night shift, in which you work three or more nights a month in addition to day shifts, can increase your risk of cancer over time because your body clock can never fully adjust. “These chronic circadian disruptions have serious implications for cancer as well as obesity, heart disease, and inflammation,” Finkielstein says. Aim to wake up and fall asleep within the same two-hour window every day to minimize the effects. (Related: What's Worse: Sleep Deprivation or Disrupted Sleep?)

Use mood lighting.

One of the top things that suppresses nighttime melatonin levels is too much light. “Animal studies indicate that irregular circadian cycles caused by continuous exposure to irregular light-dark cycles favor the progression of malignant diseases, like cancer in breast tissues,” Finkielstein says. Cut back on the amount of brightness you’re exposed to at least an hour or two before bedtime, El-Ashry says. Ideally, try for a candlelight level of ambient light—meaning just enough to see where you’re going. Turn off your electronics earlier too. (See: The Best Light-Blocking Sleep Masks, According to Amazon Reviews)

10 breast cancer survivors in same family celebrate being disease-free

10 breast cancer survivors in same family celebrate being disease-free The first diagnoses came in 2002, and then nine others followed.

Gallery: 30 Famous Women Who Beat Breast Cancer (Provided by 24/7)

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and in recognition of this, 24/7 Wall St. decided to highlight several well-known women who have defeated the disease. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women, with 245,299 new cases reported in 2016 in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Breast cancer is most commonly diagnosed in women who are 55 years and older. About one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer during their lifetime. After lung cancer, it is the second leading cause of death from cancer among women. These are the most common types of cancer in men and women. 24/7 Wall St. compiled a list of 30 famous women who survived their battle with breast cancer. We reviewed sources such as the National Breast Cancer Foundation to create our list, which features women who were diagnosed at a range of ages and from a variety of professions. We only included women who have completed treatment and are now cancer-free.   Women who have an immediate family member, such as a mother, sister, or even a daughter, with a history of breast cancer are at a much greater risk of developing cancer themselves -- about twice as likely -- as women without such history. It is important for women to check for hereditary breast cancer and other cancers. Here other health tips every woman should know. Three women on this list have died, although not from their bout with breast cancer. Shirley Temple Black, Happy Rockefeller, and Betty Ford all go down in history as women who raised awareness of the disease during the 1970s, a time when such ailments were not publicly discussed. All three women defeated breast cancer and lived long lives.

Oklahoma news anchor diagnosed with breast cancer after streaming first-ever mammogram on Facebook Live .
An Oklahoma journalist who chose to air her first-ever mammogram on Facebook Live was subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer, she said. © KFOR via Fox NewsIn October 2018, Ali Meyer, a reporter with Oklahoma’s News 4 (KFOR), chose to live-stream her mammogram “because I thought it might remind some women to schedule theirs,” she wrote in an essay posted to the news station’s website. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

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