Health & Fit: Study: Current and ex-smokers may lower lung cancer risk with exercise - Smokers consume 200 extra calories a day - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Health & Fit Study: Current and ex-smokers may lower lung cancer risk with exercise

23:30  18 october  2019
23:30  18 october  2019 Source:   reuters.com

The New Halloween Candy You Need for 2019

  The New Halloween Candy You Need for 2019 Share these Halloween treats with every trick-or-treater on your block—or just indulge in them, yourself! The post The New Halloween Candy You Need for 2019 appeared first on Taste of Home.

Men who are current or former smokers may be less likely to develop or die from lung cancer when they're more physically fit, a recent study suggests.

Researchers gave treadmill tests to 2,979 men - 1,602 who were former smokers and 1,377 who were current smokers - to assess their "cardiorespiratory" fitness, or how easily the circulatory and respiratory systems can supply oxygen to muscles during physical exertion. They assessed exercise capacity using a standard measurement known as metabolic equivalents (METs) which reflects how much oxygen is consumed during physical activity.

Smoke in the Past? Boosting Your Fitness Now Can Cut Your Lung Cancer Risk

  Smoke in the Past? Boosting Your Fitness Now Can Cut Your Lung Cancer Risk You can’t turn back the clock to stub out the cigs, but you can help protect your lungs going forward. Former smokers with high levels of fitness are less likely to develop lung cancer than those who are not as fit, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Among former smokers, each increase of 1 metabolic equivalent of task (MET) during the treadmill tests resulted in a 13 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer.Current smokers also experienced a boost in lung cancer prevention as well.

Researchers followed the men for an average of 11.6 years; during this period, 99 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer and 79 of these people died from cancer.

Among former smokers, each 1-MET increase during treadmill tests was associated with a 13% lower risk of developing lung cancer. Moderate to high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with a 51% to 77% lower risk of developing lung malignancies, the study found.

And among current smokers who were later diagnosed with lung cancer, each 1-met increase during treadmill tests was associated with an 18% lower risk of dying from cancer. Moderate to high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness were linked to an 84% to 85% lower risk of dying from cancer.

Blood test for smokers could slash death rates from lung cancer by detecting the disease FOUR YEARS before it shows up on scans

Blood test for smokers could slash death rates from lung cancer by detecting the disease FOUR YEARS before it shows up on scans A British study involving 12,200 people found the test detected cancer more than four years before tumours showed up on scans. The trial was led by scientists at the University of St Andrews.

"Both former and current smokers can significantly reduce their risk of developing and dying from lung cancer by achieving higher cardiorespiratory fitness," said lead study author Baruch Vainshelboim of the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System and Stanford University in Palo Alto, California.

"Aerobic exercise at moderate to vigorous intensity such walking, jogging, running, biking, or elliptical for 20 to 30 minutes three to five times a week can improve cardiorespiratory fitness," Vainshelboim said by email.

Lung cancer remains the most common cancer worldwide, with more than 2 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths a year, researchers note in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Tobacco is the single most important risk factor for developing and dying from lung cancer, accounting for up to 90% of diagnoses and more than 80% of deaths, researchers note.

The Diet You Need for Healthy Lungs

  The Diet You Need for Healthy Lungs How to build a plate that can fight off this serious respiratory disease

Eliminating low cardiorespiratory fitness as a risk factor could prevent about 11% of lung cancer diagnoses in former smokers and roughly 22% of cancer deaths in current smokers who develop lung cancer, the study authors estimated.

While the study can't prove whether or how improving aerobic fitness might directly reduce the odds of developing or dying from lung cancer, the results still point to one modifiable risk factor that current and former smokers might be able to control to reduce their risk, researchers conclude.

It's possible that being more fit helps limit exposure to toxins from cigarettes in the lungs, said Trude Eid Robsahm, a researcher at the Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, who wasn't involved in the study.

"In addition, physical activity improves activity in immune cells and produces a cancer-inhibiting environment in the tissue," Robsahm said by email.

Getting recommended levels of exercise will help, said Dr. Sudhir Kurl, a researcher at the Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland in Kuopio.

Physically active people have lower colon cancer risk

Physically active people have lower colon cancer risk Globally, colorectal cancer accounts for 10% of all new cancer cases and 9% of all cancer deaths.

"The consensus public health guideline to perform 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity such as brisk walking, jogging will move most of individuals out of the low-fitness category," Karl, who wasn't involved in the study, said by email. "It also may help smokers to quit smoking."

Gallery: 14 Things That Happen to Your Body Once You Quit Smoking (Provided by Purple Clover)

a hand holding a piece of paper: When you quit smoking, there are a number of health benefits that you’ll experience, some of which start almost immediately and some of which you’ll continue to see others throughout the years as your body heals and gets stronger.  From added energy and deeper sleep to lessening your chances of developing fatal diseases, check out these 14 things that happen to your body once you quit smoking.

Ex-FDA chief Scott Gottlieb says he is 'skeptical' that vaping nicotine causes lung cancer .
However, that doesn't mean it won't cause harm, says Gottlieb. "You can't inhale something into the lungs on a repeated basis and not cause some damage to the lung.""I'm skeptical that nicotine causes cancer," Gottlieb, a trained medical doctor, said Monday on "Squawk Box." "It might be a tumor promoter, [researchers] have said that there's a potential that nicotine is a tumor promoter, but it doesn't cause cancer.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!