Health & Fit: Study: Rural Americans more likely to die from preventable causes - - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Study: Rural Americans more likely to die from preventable causes

23:30  08 november  2019
23:30  08 november  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

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Rural Americans die more often from potentially preventable causes than their urban counterparts, a new government study shows. Between 2010 and 2017, rural counties saw a widening disparity in preventable deaths from cancer, heart disease and respiratory disease, compared to city areas.

Among rural Americans , more than 70,000 of the deaths were potentially preventable , the study found, including 25,000 from heart Cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States. Although smoking rates have declined overall in the past

Rural Americans die more often from potentially preventable causes than their urban counterparts, a new government study shows.

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These causes include cancer, heart disease, injury, respiratory disease and stroke, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention research.

Between 2010 and 2017, rural counties saw a widening disparity in preventable deaths from cancer, heart disease and respiratory disease, compared to city areas. This is despite the fact that preventable cancer deaths fell to less than 10% of all nationwide deaths from cancer in 2017.

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Among rural Americans , more than 70,000 of the deaths were potentially preventable , the study found, including 25,000 from heart disease and 19 Cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States. Although smoking rates have declined overall in

Among rural Americans , more than 70,000 of the deaths were potentially preventable , the study found They typically have less access to health care and are less likely to have health insurance. Cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States.

"We are encouraged to find that preventable deaths from cancer have gone down overall, yet there is a persistent and striking gap between rural and urban Americans for this and other leading causes of death," CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield said in an agency news release.

The rural/urban difference remained about the same for deaths due to stroke but narrowed for unintentional injuries. Researchers said the shrinking gap for preventable injuries didn't stem from improvements in rural areas. Instead, they attributed it to a spike in urban areas, largely due to the opioid crisis.

Using data from the National Vital Statistics System, CDC researchers calculated potentially preventable deaths for people under age 80.

The researchers were able to drill down beyond a distinction of urban and rural to finer categories. These included large urban areas, fringe metropolitan, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and rural areas.

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THURSDAY, Nov. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Rural Americans die more often from potentially preventable causes than their urban counterparts, a new government study shows. These causes include cancer, heart disease, injury, respiratory disease and stroke

The southeastern United States had the highest number of preventable deaths, according to the report.

  • In 2017, 22% of cancer deaths in the most rural counties were potentially preventable, compared to 29% in 2010. In the most urban areas, 3% of cancer deaths were potentially preventable in 2017, compared to 18% in 2010.
  • In both 2010 and 2017, 45% of heart disease deaths in rural counties were deemed potentially preventable — compared to 24% in large fringe metro areas in 2010 and 19% in 2017.
  • In 2010, 61% of deaths from unintentional injury were potentially preventable in the most rural counties, compared with 25% in the most urban. By 2017, that rose to 64% in rural counties and 48% in urban areas.
  • In 2017, 57% of rural deaths from chronic respiratory disease were potentially preventable, up from 54% in 2010. That compared to 13% in the most urban counties in 2017 and 23% in 2010.
  • In 2017, 38% of stroke deaths in rural counties were potentially preventable, compared to 42% in 2010. In large fringe metro areas, 23% were potentially preventable in 2010 and 17% in 2017.

Closing the gaps starts with recognizing that people in rural areas tend to be older and sicker than people in cities, the CDC said. Compared to city dwellers, rural Americans smoke more, have higher rates of obesity, report less physical activity during leisure time and are less likely to buckle up when they drive.

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A new CDC study demonstrates that Americans living in rural areas are more likely to die from five leading causes than their urban counterparts. The percentages of deaths that were potentially preventable were higher in rural areas than in urban areas. The report and a companion

Rural Americans die more often from potentially preventable causes than their urban counterparts, a new government study shows. Compared to city dwellers, rural Americans smoke more , have higher rates of obesity, report less physical activity during leisure time and are less likely to buckle up

They're also poorer, have less access to health care and are less likely to have health insurance.

To combat these problems, the CDC urged health care providers in rural areas to make blood pressure and cancer screening a priority. The agency also called on people in rural areas to get more active, eat healthier, lose weight, quit smoking and wear seat belts.

Researchers added that doctors should be more careful when prescribing opioids.

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