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Health & Fit The flu vaccine is not 100% effective but you should still get it every year

01:15  12 november  2019
01:15  12 november  2019 Source:   msn.com

The Best Time to Get Your Flu Shot Is A Lot Sooner Than You May Think

The Best Time to Get Your Flu Shot Is A Lot Sooner Than You May Think Doctor’s orders!

How effective the flu vaccine is will vary from year to year . It can range anywhere from 20% to 60% effective . Each year , flu vaccines are designed to protect against three to four different viral strains of influenza. But no matter how effective the flu vaccine is , it 's not 100 % effective .

No, the Flu Shot Is Not 100 Percent Effective . Yes, You Still Need It . Some protection is better than no protection. For anyone skeptical about getting a flu shot due to its shortcomings, there are two things you should think about: influenza vaccination is not just about protecting yourself against

  The flu vaccine is not 100% effective but you should still get it every year © Getty/ STAN HONDA / Staff
  • How effective the flu vaccine is will vary from year to year. It can range anywhere from 20% to 60% effective.
  • Each year, flu vaccines are designed to protect against three to four different viral strains of influenza. But sometimes the viral strains that end up in the flu vaccine don't match the viral strains that make people sick.
  • The CDC says it's too soon to tell how effective this year's flu vaccine will be but encourages everyone who is eligible to get a flu vaccine.
  • This article was reviewed by Tania Elliott, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases related to allergies and immunology for internal medicine at NYU Langone Health.

The flu vaccine is the most effective way to protect yourself against infection from the influenza virus. The CDC says it's too early to measure the effectiveness of this year's flu shot, but Helen Branswell at Stat reports that if the main flu virus this year is a type of H1N1, the vaccine should be fairly effective.

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  7 Reasons Not to Get the Flu Shot — And Why They’re Wrong To help protect the health of your family, there really is no excuse to skip the flu shot.Trouble is, only about half of the nation gets immunized each year. Experts believe that a handful of mistruths and conceptions about the flu shot is partly to blame for too-low vaccination rates. Here are popular reasons not to get the flu shot, dismantled by science, one by one.

“While the vaccine is not 100 percent effective , it decreases the risk of getting sick with influenza significantly, and more importantly, decreases the risk of admission to the hospital, admission to an ICU, and death,” O’Leary told Healthline. The benefit of the seasonal flu vaccine goes well beyond our

For anyone skeptical about getting a flu shot due to its shortcomings, there are two things you should think about: influenza vaccination is not just about Let’s take a step back and first discuss why the flu vaccine isn’t 100 percent effective . Because the circulating influenza viruses change from year to

But no matter how effective the flu vaccine is, it's not 100% effective. In fact, it's not even close.

How effective is the flu vaccine?

How effective the flu vaccine is will vary from year to year.

In a good year, when the flu vaccine is most effective, it can reduce your risk of getting sick by 60%. That means you have at least a 40% chance of getting the flu if you are exposed to it, even if you're vaccinated.

But that's better than a bad year when the flu vaccine's effectiveness can dip below 20%, meaning you still have more than an 80% chance of getting the flu if you are exposed to it. So why the big difference?

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  Flu season 2019: What to expect and how to prepare The aches, the sneezing, the sore throat, the exhaustion -- flu season is here and you want to be prepared. © Andreas Rentz/Getty Images BERLIN - OCTOBER 26: A doctor injects a H1N1 swine flu vaccination in the arm of a male nurse of the Charite at Virchow clinical center on October 26, 2009 in Berlin, Germany. German officials have begun a mass immunization by offering the vaccine to policemen, firefighters, medical personnel and other people who work in the health or rescue services across Germany. The rest of the population will be receiving the vaccine in approximately 7 days.

Every year , I urge my patients to get the influenza vaccine . And every year , they come up with a bucketful of -- The conventional flu vaccine is pretty effective , but it 's not 100 % effective . Getting vaccinated not only protects you , but also helps protect others who may not be able to fight

Still , even when the flu vaccine is “less effective ,” it ’s a good bet. That ’s still not that bad. Even at an N.N.T. of 100 , for every 100 people who get a flu shot, one fewer will get the flu . But to minimize your chances of illness, yes, you should still get the flu shot this year , and any year .

For most healthy adults, the chance of getting the flu after being vaccinated largely depends on the vaccine itself.

Each year, flu vaccines are designed to protect against three to four different viral strains of influenza. Most often, the World Health Organization selects those strains for the upcoming flu season in the Northern Hemisphere from viruses that have been circulating in the Southern Hemisphere in the previous six months.

But sometimes the viral strains that end up in the flu vaccine for the US and the rest of the Northern Hemisphere don't match the viral strains that end up circulating come flu season. This can happen when a new viral strain arises at the wrong time.

"Every once in a while there's a surprise and something emerges late in the season that's unexpected, and that's one reason the vaccine is not 100% effective," says Graham Snyder, MD, medical director of infection prevention at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine.

How Effective Is the Flu Shot This Year?

  How Effective Is the Flu Shot This Year? Experts reveal everything you need to know about the 2019-2020 flu shot. First of all, if you're concerned that getting the flu shot will give you the flu, that's a total misconception. Flu shot side effects typically include soreness, tenderness, and swelling at the injection site. At worst, you might have some flu-like symptoms immediately after getting the shot, such as low-grade fever, muscle aches, tiredness, and headaches, Gustavo Ferrer, M.D., founder of the Cleveland Clinic Florida Cough Clinic, told us. (FluMist, the flu vaccine nasal spray, can have similar side effects.

No, vaccines are never 100 % effective . Some vaccine approach that -- smallpox vaccine was about 95% effective , measles vaccine is about 98% , yellow Now that you understand how our body uses these IgH gene "tools" to make antibodies, you should know that there is a large amount of variation

Vaccines that are made with killed versions of pathogens—or with only a part of the pathogen— are not able to cause illness. It is important to note that attenuated vaccines can cause serious problems for individuals with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients.

In this case, when the strains in the vaccine don't match the strains making people sick, it can mean a less effective flu vaccine - well below 60% effectiveness - and a greater chance of still getting the flu after your shot.

For instance, this is exactly what happened during the 2014-15 flu season. That year there were multiple strains of a type of flu virus, called H3N2, going around. But the vaccine didn't have a strain that matched most of the H3N2 strains that were making people sick. So researchers estimated that the flu vaccine was only 13% effective against H3N2 that season.

This helps explain why the 2014-15 flu season had some of the highest percentages of hospitalizations and deaths from influenza compared to the five flu seasons before it.

That said, during the more moderate 2016-17 flu season, when the flu vaccine was estimated to be 40% overall effective, flu vaccines prevented an estimated 5.3 million flu-related illnesses and 2.6 million medical visits, according to the CDC.

For this year's vaccine, the FDA has recommended it contain a type of H1N1, H3N2, and two versions of flu-type B. So the effectiveness of this year's vaccine will depend on which flu virus circulates this flu season.

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Still , experts said the current vaccine offers some protection against H3N2. Its 25 percent effectiveness rate means that one in four people who get the shot reduce their risk of becoming sick enough to need Even in a good year , the flu vaccine is never as effective as most other vaccines .

Get vaccinated . The World Health Organisation (WHO) monitors the strain in one hemisphere and then makes an informed guess in developing a vaccine for The good news is that this year ’s vaccine is a good match with the virus and so there’s a relatively high efficacy rate, although it ’s still only about 60

For more information about this year's flu vaccine, visit the CDC's website.

What are other flu vaccine options?


The nasal-spray vaccine can be an ideal alternative for people afraid of getting the flu shot, including children over the age of 2, but how effective it is can vary year to year.

For example, a 2019 study published in the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics found that the nasal spray vaccine for the 2018-19 flu season was less effective than the flu shot in protecting children from getting two common strains of the flu, H1N1 and H3N2. But the nasal spray has since been reformulated for upcoming seasons.

The nasal vaccine is a live, weakened version of the virus, and is not recommended in anyone who has a weakened immune system, pregnancy, or chronic medical problems.

There is also a high-dose flu shot that contains more virus particles than the regular shot so that the immune system is stimulated more rigorously. This inoculation is for people aged 65 and older whose immune system may not be as strong. When this population receives a regular-dose flu shot, they may not produce as many protective antibodies and therefore are at a higher risk of getting sick with the flu.

A 2014 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that people 65 and older who received the high-dose shot suffered 24% overall fewer illnesses from influenza compared to older adults who received the standard dose.

"I encourage people to talk to their doctor about what type of vaccine is best for them," Snyder says.

Gallery: Things You Need to Know Before You Get Your Flu Shot (Provided by The Active Times)

After the vaccination, the young boy is proud he was brave.

Yes, you can still get the flu after a flu shot .
There are a lot of ways you can get the flu after a flu shot including you got the shot too early or you caught the virus shortly after vaccination.Here are the primary ways you can still get the flu after a flu vaccine.

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