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Health & Fit Will you get dementia? Many may not understand their risk

19:50  15 november  2019
19:50  15 november  2019 Source:   ap.org

This 19-Year-Old Created an App to Help His Family Handle His Grandmother’s Dementia

  This 19-Year-Old Created an App to Help His Family Handle His Grandmother’s Dementia After watching his family struggle to take care of his grandmother with dementia, Logan Wells created an app that he hopes will help caregivers worldwide.

Many older American adults may inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it, new The results suggest many didn’t understand the connection between physical health and brain health and how racial differences can affect dementia risk .

Many older American adults may inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it, new research suggests. Almost half of adults surveyed believed they were likely to develop dementia . The results suggest many didn’t understand the connection

New research suggests many American adults inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it.

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, an elderly couple walks down a hall in Easton, Pa. Research released on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019 suggests many American adults inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, an elderly couple walks down a hall in Easton, Pa. Research released on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019 suggests many American adults inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

A survey of 1,000 adults aged 50 to 64 found almost half believed they were likely to develop dementia, but suggests many didn’t understand the connection between physical health and brain health.

Immersive therapy aims to bring memories back to life for those with dementia

Immersive therapy aims to bring memories back to life for those with dementia Some senior care programs use reminiscence therapy to create environments designed to replicate moments from the distant past.

Many older American adults may inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it, new research suggests. Almost half of adults surveyed believed they were likely to develop dementia . The results suggest many didn’t understand the connection between

Many older American adults may inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it, new The results suggest many didn't understand the connection between physical health and brain health and how racial differences can affect dementia risk .

Video: 10 Facts About Dementia (Newsweek)

Substantial numbers of people who rated their health as fair or poor thought their dementia chances were low. Many who said they were in excellent health said they were likely to develop the memory robbing disease.

Research has shown that exercise and a good diet make dementia less likely. Rigorous mental stimulation may also help. Many surveyed said they used unproven tactics, like taking supplements and doing crossword puzzles.

The study was published online Friday in JAMA Neurology.

Gallery: 40 habits to reduce your risk of dementia after 40 (Best Life)

a group of people preparing food in a kitchen: You might feel silly, but unleashing your inner pop star and belting out some music while practicing your moves can make you feel years younger. “Simple acts like singing and dancing to your favorite music can keep you young,” Yoon says. “I listen and dance to a wide range of music, from ’70s music to pop. Singing strengthens muscles in the airway, which improves lung function and mental alertness by delivering more oxygen to the brain. Plus, it’s just so fun.”

Phone support tied to better outcomes for dementia patients, caregivers .
Dementia patients and the family members who care for them may have a better quality of life when they have access to telephone and online support, the results of a clinical trial suggest. © monkeybusinessimages/Getty ImagesResearchers tested the effectiveness of a program known as the Care Ecosystem, which provided patient navigators and access to nurses, social workers and pharmacists along with regular phone check-ins to caregivers of dementia patients.

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