Health & Fit: Will you get dementia? Many may not understand their risk - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Health & Fit Will you get dementia? Many may not understand their risk

19:50  15 november  2019
19:50  15 november  2019 Source:   ap.org

High blood pressure could make your brain shrink over time, according to new research

High blood pressure could make your brain shrink over time, according to new research People with high blood pressure in their 40s, or with a bigger blood pressure change in their late 30s and 40s, were most at risk.

Dementia symptoms, signs, causes, diagnosis, risks and treatments – get information and learn the Professional evaluation may detect a treatable condition. And even if symptoms suggest dementia , early Understanding Alzheimer's and Dementia outlines the difference between Alzheimer's and

The brain is the most powerful and most complex object ever made. Looking after it promotes brain health and may lessen our chances of developing Although we can’t prevent all types of dementia , we may be able to decrease the risk of dementia . There is growing evidence that leading a healthy

New research suggests many American adults inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it.

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, an elderly couple walks down a hall in Easton, Pa. Research released on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019 suggests many American adults inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, an elderly couple walks down a hall in Easton, Pa. Research released on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019 suggests many American adults inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

A survey of 1,000 adults aged 50 to 64 found almost half believed they were likely to develop dementia, but suggests many didn’t understand the connection between physical health and brain health.

Even 2 Minutes of Exercise a Week May Lessen Risk of Dementia

Even 2 Minutes of Exercise a Week May Lessen Risk of Dementia According to the Department of Health and Human Services, most healthy adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise a week. 

Get your blood pressure checked if you are 45 or over and keep it under control. Nonetheless these interventions should delay dementia for some years for many people and this would be an enormous achievement and enable many more people to reach the end of their life without developing dementia .

This may be because they don't understand what dementia is or are afraid of the effect on your relationship. Try to explain what your diagnosis means and the ways in which family and friends can help and support you . Read more about activities for dementia . How your relationships may change.

Video: 10 Facts About Dementia (Newsweek)

Substantial numbers of people who rated their health as fair or poor thought their dementia chances were low. Many who said they were in excellent health said they were likely to develop the memory robbing disease.

Research has shown that exercise and a good diet make dementia less likely. Rigorous mental stimulation may also help. Many surveyed said they used unproven tactics, like taking supplements and doing crossword puzzles.

The study was published online Friday in JAMA Neurology.

Gallery: 40 habits to reduce your risk of dementia after 40 (Best Life)

a group of people preparing food in a kitchen: You might feel silly, but unleashing your inner pop star and belting out some music while practicing your moves can make you feel years younger. “Simple acts like singing and dancing to your favorite music can keep you young,” Yoon says. “I listen and dance to a wide range of music, from ’70s music to pop. Singing strengthens muscles in the airway, which improves lung function and mental alertness by delivering more oxygen to the brain. Plus, it’s just so fun.”

Dementia impacts women more and new approaches are needed .
To provide a better future for millions of Americans impacted by dementia, we must act now. NoraSuper is senior director of the Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging. She previously was executive director of the White House Conference on Aging.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!