Health & Fit: Study: Men who smoke marijuana daily may increase risk of testicular cancer - - PressFrom - US
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Health & Fit Study: Men who smoke marijuana daily may increase risk of testicular cancer

00:03  03 december  2019
00:03  03 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

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They added: ‘Sustained marijuana use may increase the risk for testicular cancer .’ Men who regularly smoke cannabis increase their risk of developing testicular cancer , according to a study by US experts [File photo].

The researchers added: “Sustained marijuana use may increase the risk for testicular cancer .” They estimated that long-term users of cannabis were 36 This was compared to similar males who did not use the drug. It has been suggested by some groups campaigning for cannabis to be legalised in the

  • According to a new study, men who smoke one marijuana cigarette daily have a 36% increased risk of developing testicular cancer compared to men who have never smoked the substance.
  • The researchers said their study offers insights into the ways long-term marijuana smoking could affect men and raises red flags about new marijuana consumption methods like vaping that are currently understudied.
  • Although just 1% of all men get testicular cancer, according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders, it's the most commonly diagnosed cancer in males between the ages of 15 and 35.

There's new evidence that a daily marijuana-smoking habit could increase your risk of testicular cancer.

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Men who regularly smoke cannabis — or marijuana , as it’s more colloquially known — are 36 percent more likely to develop testicular cancer than men “Sustained marijuana use may increase the risk for testicular cancer , but overall, the association of marijuana use and cancer development remains

Blokes who smoke cannabis heighten their risk of developing testicular cancer by more than a third, according to new research. A study in the American Medical Association, concludes: "Regular marijuana use was associated with development of testicular germ cell tumours."

According to a study published Nov. 27 in JAMA, men who smoke one marijuana cigarette, or joint, daily for 10 years or more have an estimated 36% increased risk of developing testicular cancer compared to men who have never smoked the substance.

To come to their conclusion, researchers analyzed 25 previous studies that looked at the link between marijuana use and different cancers including testicular cancer, lung cancer, oral cancer, and head and neck cancer.

Although the researchers found no association between regular marijuana use and lung, neck, or oral cancer, they did find that regular weed smoking over many years heightened a man's testicular cancer risk.

Study: Dads Who Smoke Marijuana Could Increase Partners' Risk of Miscarriage

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Smoking cannabis puts men at increased risk of the most aggressive type of testicular cancer , say scientists. Risk : Men who smoke one a week are said to be twice as likely to get cancer . ‘Our study is the first inkling that marijuana use may be associated with testicular cancer , and we still have a

PROBLEM: Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), already the most common cancer in men aged Those who reported using marijuana less than once per week or for fewer than ten years were at The full study , "Population-based case-control study of recreational drug use and testis cancer risk

Like smoking cigarettes, smoking marijuana releases carcinogens or substances that can increase a person's risk of developing cancer.

That's because cannabis, the plant marijuana is derived from, is like any other plant, according to Dr. Jeffrey Chen, the director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, in that it burns and releases smoke when you light it. "When you combust any plant, you're creating significantly more carcinogens," Chen previously told Insider.

The study researchers were unable to determine why their meta-analysis showed only a link between smoking pot and testicular cancer, but none of the other three cancers they analyzed.

They did, however, note that the varying populations of each study they analyzed could have contributed to their findings. For example, the meta-analysis only included studies written in English, which could have left out large swaths of the population.

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Men who smoke cannabis are at greater risk of testicular cancer , a new study suggests, but men who The investigators found that men with a history of using marijuana were twice as likely to have subtypes of While it is unknown how cocaine may influence testicular cancer risk , the authors

According to a U.S. study released today, smoking marijuana may increase a male's risk of developing testicular cancer by as much as 70 per cent The study also showed those who smoke marijuana are 70 per cent more likely to develop testicular cancer compared to those who do not

Additionally, since the studies were published between 1973 and 2018, some of the older studies may not reflect the current population's marijuana consumption habits. And, of course, the study could not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

Nonetheless, the researchers said their study offers insights into the ways long-term marijuana smoking could affect men and raises red flags about new marijuana consumption methods like vaping that are currently understudied.

And, as marijuana continues to be legalized, more people may be picking up marijuana smoking habits, so it's important to understand the substance's health risks, the researchers wrote.

Although just 1% of all men get testicular cancer, according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders, it's the most commonly diagnosed cancer in males between the ages of 15 and 35. Every year, an estimated 8,850 men are diagnosed with the disease.

According to NORD, the most common testicular cancer symptom is a firm but painless bump on the testicle, which is a cancerous tumor. If one testicle swells, that's also a sign of cancer.

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The CANCER study was conducted in 163 young men who were diagnosed with the testicular germ cell tumor type of testicular cancer between Earlier this year, a government study showed that marijuana use is up among teens, with 23 percent of high-schoolers recently reporting smoking

Study : Smoking marijuana may double risk of testicular cancer . United States researchers have found that men who regularly smoke cannabis have a 70 per cent increased risk of developing testicular cancer . The study was based on questionnaires of 369 men with the cancer .

Other symptoms include aching in the stomach or scrotum areas, nausea, weight loss, vomiting, and difficulty breathing.

Fortunately, testicular cancer is one of the most treatable forms of cancer, according to NORD. It's usually curable with surgery, and sometimes also requires radiation or chemotherapy.

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Smoke in the Past? Boosting Your Fitness Now Can Cut Your Lung Cancer Risk .
You can’t turn back the clock to stub out the cigs, but you can help protect your lungs going forward. Former smokers with high levels of fitness are less likely to develop lung cancer than those who are not as fit, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Among former smokers, each increase of 1 metabolic equivalent of task (MET) during the treadmill tests resulted in a 13 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer.Current smokers also experienced a boost in lung cancer prevention as well.

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