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Health & Fit HPV vaccine: Just 1 dose may protect against infection, new study suggests

23:35  27 december  2019
23:35  27 december  2019 Source:   cnn.com

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A single dose of the human papillomavirus ( HPV ) vaccine may be enough to protect women against infection with the virus over the long-term, a new study from Costa Rica suggests . In fact, a previous study by the same researchers suggested just that: women in that study who received all

A major new study has found that a single dose of the human papillomavirus vaccine , Cervarix, is just as effective as the currently recommended three What's more, a special two-shot protocol could protect against additional strains of the virus not previously thought to be addressed by the vaccine .

A single dose of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine may be just as effective as two or three doses at preventing cancer-causing HPV infection, a new study suggests.

MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 21: University of Miami pediatrician Judith L. Schaechter, M.D. (L) gives an HPV vaccination to a 13-year-old girl in her office at the Miller School of Medicine on September 21, 2011 in Miami, Florida. The vaccine for human papillomavirus, or HPV, is given to prevent a sexually transmitted infection that can cause cancer. Recently the issue of the vaccination came up during the Republican race for president when Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) called the vaccine to prevent cervical cancer 'dangerous' and said that it may cause mental retardation, but expert opinion in the medical field contradicts her claim. Texas Gov. Rick Perry, also a presidential contender, has taken heat from some within his party for presiding over a vaccination program in his home state. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)© Joe Raedle/Getty Images/FILE MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 21: University of Miami pediatrician Judith L. Schaechter, M.D. (L) gives an HPV vaccination to a 13-year-old girl in her office at the Miller School of Medicine on September 21, 2011 in Miami, Florida. The vaccine for human papillomavirus, or HPV, is given to prevent a sexually transmitted infection that can cause cancer. Recently the issue of the vaccination came up during the Republican race for president when Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) called the vaccine to prevent cervical cancer 'dangerous' and said that it may cause mental retardation, but expert opinion in the medical field contradicts her claim. Texas Gov. Rick Perry, also a presidential contender, has taken heat from some within his party for presiding over a vaccination program in his home state. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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A single dose of the human papillomavirus ( HPV ) vaccine may be enough to protect women against infection with the virus over the long-term, a new In fact, a previous study by the same researchers suggested just that: women in that study who received all three HPV doses were protected

Research suggests that vaccine protection is long-lasting. Current studies have followed vaccinated individuals for ten years, and show that there is no But HPV can infect areas that are not covered by a condom—so condoms may not fully protect against HPV . People can also lower their chances of

The study, published in the medical journal JAMA Network Open on Friday, found that compared with unvaccinated women, infection with certain high-risk HPV types was significantly less prevalent among women who received one, two or three doses of HPV vaccine.

The study involved analyzing data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey on 1,620 women in the United States ages 18 to 26. The researchers took a close look at HPV vaccination rates and HPV infection among the women between 2009 and 2016.

The study found that 111 of the 1,004 unvaccinated women were diagnosed with infections of HPV types 6, 11, 16 or 18 between 2009 and 2016.

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  Marcia Cross’ anal cancer may have been linked to HPV. She wants people to know they could have the virus, too. Marcia Cross said that getting an HPV-related cancer is "not something that you do wrong, it doesn't have to do with whatever sexual life you have.""It's a virus," she told Insider on Tuesday. "It's not something that you do wrong, it doesn't have to do with whatever sexual life you have.

HPV vaccination does not protect against other infections spread during sex, such as chlamydia, and it will not stop girls getting pregnant, so it's still very important to practise safe sex. Who can have the HPV vaccine through the NHS vaccination programme? From September 2019, the first dose

The vaccine protects against HPV types 16 and 18, which are believed to cause about 70 percent of cervical cancers. The vaccine was originally approved to be Brotherton is the author of an editorial accompanying the study . Cervarix maker GlaxoSmithKline provided funding for one of the studies .

Yet only four of the 106 women vaccinated with one dose; seven of the 126 women vaccinated with two doses; and 14 of the 384 women vaccinated with three doses were diagnosed with those infections during that time period.

"Our study suggests that US women who received 1 dose of the HPV vaccine may have gained similar protection against vaccine-type infections compared with those who received additional doses," the researchers wrote in the study. "These findings support previous observational studies and post hoc analyses of vaccine trials that demonstrated comparable effectiveness of 1 dose to 2 or 3 doses."

HPV is a group of more than 200 related viruses, which can spread through sexual contact. In some cases, HPV infection can lead to six types of cancer: cervical, anal, penile, vaginal, vulvar and oropharyngeal (mouth and throat).

"HPV vaccine coverage is less than 10% globally because of poor vaccine uptake rates in many resource-limited countries. Ensuring boys and girls receive their first dose is a big challenge in several countries and a majority of adolescents are not able to complete the recommended series due to a lack of intensive infrastructure needed to administer two or three doses," the study's senior author, Ashish Deshmukh, an assistant professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston's School of Public, said in a press release on Friday.

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Two doses of the HPV vaccine are recommended for all boys and girls at ages 11-12; the vaccine can be given as early as age 9. If you wait until they’re older, they may need Among young adult women, infections with HPV types that cause most HPV cancers and genital warts have dropped 71 percent.

A single dose of the HPV vaccine could be enough to protect against infections which cause 70 per cent of cervical cancers, a new study reveals. Doctors found just one lot of the bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine may offer a similar level of protection as the two or three doses normally

"If ongoing clinical trials provide evidence regarding sustained benefits of a one-dose regimen, then implications of single-dose strategy could be substantial for reducing the burden of these cancers globally," he said.

British boys aged 12 and 13 will now be vaccinated against the HPV virus.© Photo Illustration/Thinkstock British boys aged 12 and 13 will now be vaccinated against the HPV virus. The vaccine can protect against certain cancers since it works by preventing HPV infection.

It's estimated that about 80% of people will get an HPV infection in their lifetime. While most HPV infections don't cause cancer, high-risk HPV infections that persist can cause cancer and roughly half of infections are with a high-risk type, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In June, actress and "Desperate Housewives" star Marcia Cross opened up about her battle with anal cancer. Cross, 57, revealed her diagnosis in a series of Instagram photos in 2018. Her husband, Tom Mahoney, was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2009. Doctors now suspect that Cross' cancer and Mahoney's came from the same type of HPV.

Anal cancer rates and deaths are climbing in the US

  Anal cancer rates and deaths are climbing in the US Anal cancer cases and deaths are rising dramatically in the United States, especially among older people and young black men, a new study says. © Shutterstock Squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the anus and anal/rectal junction are usually associated with human papilloma virus (HPV). Focal residual rectal glands are seen in the center of photomicrograph. Researchers examined trends in anal cancer cases over about 15 years, and identified about 69,000 cases of anal cancer and more than 12,000 deaths during this time.

Cross said at the time she planned to get her 12-year-old twin daughters vaccinated. The actress told CNN she cares deeply about being able to "educate the public about HPV."

"In spite of the optics, I care deeply about saving lives," Cross previously wrote in an email to CNN. "To that end, the important thing to do is to educate the public about HPV. It is so common that nearly every person who is sexually active will get it at some point in their lifetime. HPV can cause cervical and other cancers .... It can take years, even decades to develop."

The CDC currently recommends two doses of the HPV vaccine for boys and girls ages 11 and 12. The first dose is recommended around those ages and the second is recommended six to 12 months after the first dose. Children who start the vaccine series on or after their 15th birthday need three shots over six months, according to the CDC.

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