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Health & Fit Your waist size may be more important than weight for multiple heart attack risk

02:50  21 january  2020
02:50  21 january  2020 Source:   cnn.com

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Women with bigger waists relative to their hips are at more risk of heart attacks than men of a similar "apple shape", research from the George The study showed waist -to-hip ratio to be a better heart attack predictor than general obesity - 18% stronger than body mass index in women and 6% in men.

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Heart attack survivors who carry extra weight around their belly are at greater risk of another heart attack, new research has found, another reason why measuring your waist may be more important than stepping on the scale.

It's been known for a while that having a pot belly, even if you are slim elsewhere, increases the odds of having a first heart attack, but the latest study, which published Monday in the European Journal of Preventative Cardiology, is the first time researchers have found a link between belly fat and the risk of a subsequent heart attack or stroke.

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Excess weight may increase the risk for many health problems, including. type 2 diabetes. Another important number to know is your waist size in inches. Having too much fat around your waist In the United States, type 2 diabetes is more common among blacks, Latinos, and American Indians

The researchers measured waist size , waist -to-hip ratio, waist -to-height ratio and BMI (body mass index). All four measures were associated with heart In that study, researchers from the University of Heidelberg found that BMI was not independently associated with the risk for stroke – but belly fat was !

The link was particularly strong in men, researchers said.

"Abdominal obesity not only increases your risk for a first heart attack or stroke, but also the risk for recurrent events after the first misfortune," said Dr. Hanieh Mohammadi of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, in a news release.

"Maintaining a healthy waist circumference is important for preventing future heart attacks and strokes regardless of how many drugs you may be taking or how healthy your blood tests are."

The study tracked more than 22,000 Swedish patients after their first heart attack and looked at the link between their waist circumference and events caused by clogged arteries like fatal and non-fatal heart attacks and stroke. Patients were followed for nearly four years, with 1,232 men (7.3%) and 469 women (7.9%) experiencing a heart attack or stroke.

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According to several recent studies, both waist size and the waist to hip ratio may be better indicators of heart disease risk than the traditional Body Mass Index (BMI). The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that people aim for a BMI of between 18.5 and 24.9 however most Americans

Most patients — 78% of men and 90% of women — had abdominal obesity, defined as a waist circumference of 94 cm (37.6 inches) or above for men, and 80 cm (32 inches) or above for women.

The study found that belly fat was associated with heart attacks and stroke independent of other risk factors like smoking, diabetes, hypertension, body mass index and prevention treatments. The researchers stressed that waist circumference was a more important marker than overall obesity and advised doctors to measure their patient's waists to identify those at risk.

However, they said that the link was stronger and more linear in men, who made up nearly three-fourths of the patients included in the study, than women.

In women, Mohammadi said the relationship was "U-shaped" rather than linear, meaning that the mid-range waist measurement, rather than the narrowest, was least risky. What's more, the mid-range waist measurement was in the range traditionally recognized as at risk for abdominal obesity: more than 80 cm wide.

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For women, their waist size and waist -to-hip ratio may have an impact on heart attack risk , according to a new study. This type of fat is more closely linked with insulin resistance and other cardiometabolic risk factors. Sex may influence the type of fat that a person is more predisposed to.

A new study has found waist size to be a more significant contributor to heart attack risk than the actual body… by eurogee. This is against the agelong practice in which a measure of BMI was considered as a more accurate indicator of risk of heart disease, although it is a generally agreed

The reason for this could be down to the type of fat that tends to hang out on men's and women's bellies. Mohammadi said some studies have suggested that men may have more visceral fat that goes deep inside your body and wraps around your vital organs.

This fat can be turned into cholesterol that can start collecting along and hardening your arteries, perhaps ultimately leading to a heart attack or stroke.

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The size of your waist can tell you far more about the state of your health than the number on a bathroom scale. Last month, The International Journal of Obesity suggested that, particularly for young people, the waist -to-height ratio might be a better indicator of overall health risks .

Men have a greater risk of heart attack than women do, and men have attacks earlier in life. Most people with a significant family history of heart disease have one or more other risk factors. Many people may have difficulty losing weight . But for those above a healthy weight , a sustained weight

"In women it is thought that a greater portion of the abdominal fat is constituted by subcutaneous fat which is relatively harmless," she said.

However, the lower numbers of women included in the study meant the findings had less "statistical power" and more research was needed to draw definite conclusions, Mohammadi said.

The risk of cardiovascular disease like heart attacks or strokes is considered to be higher in those with a waist measurement of above 94 cm in men and above 80 cm in women, according to the World Health Organization. The risk is thought to be substantially increased in men with a waist wider than 102 cm and 88 cm in women.

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Muhlestein added that reducing your waist size may reduce your risks . For this investigation, scientists measured waist circumference, total "Abdominal fat produces a wide range of inflammatory substances, and is more highly correlated with heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes than

27.5 or more are at high risk . Why waist size also matters. Measuring your waist is a good way to check you're not carrying too much fat around your See a GP if you're concerned about your child's weight . They may be able to refer you to your local healthy lifestyle programme for children, young

The authors said that belly fat was best tackled by a healthy diet and regular exercise. Earlier studies have shown that regular moderate cardio, like walking for at least 30 minutes a day, can help fight a widening waistline. Strength training with weights may also help but spot exercises like sit-ups that can tighten abs won't touch visceral fat.

a woman standing in a room: REEDLEY, CA - OCTOBER 21:  Seventeen year-old Marissa Hamilton stands on a scale during her weekly weigh-in at the Wellspring Academy October 21, 2009 in Reedley, California. Struggling with her weight, seventeen year-old Marissa Hamilton enrolled at the Wellspring Academy, a special school that helps teens and college level students lose weight along with academic courses. When Marissa first started her semester at Wellspring she weighed in at 340 pounds and has since dropped over 40 pounds of weight in the first two months of the program. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 percent of children in the US ages 6-19 years are overweight or obese, three times the amount since 1980.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)© Justin Sullivan/Getty Images North America/Getty Images REEDLEY, CA - OCTOBER 21: Seventeen year-old Marissa Hamilton stands on a scale during her weekly weigh-in at the Wellspring Academy October 21, 2009 in Reedley, California. Struggling with her weight, seventeen year-old Marissa Hamilton enrolled at the Wellspring Academy, a special school that helps teens and college level students lose weight along with academic courses. When Marissa first started her semester at Wellspring she weighed in at 340 pounds and has since dropped over 40 pounds of weight in the first two months of the program. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 percent of children in the US ages 6-19 years are overweight or obese, three times the amount since 1980. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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