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Health & Fit Would your child know how to call 911 in an emergency?

03:05  09 may  2017
03:05  09 may  2017 Source:   today.com

Heat Stroke Death a Risk to Children in Hot Cars

  Heat Stroke Death a Risk to Children in Hot Cars Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. With warm weather, sadly, come tragic cases of children being left in hot cars and dying from heat stroke. On average, 37 children in the U.S. die of heat stroke each year after being left in a hot car, according to KidsAndCars.org. With warm weather, sadly, come tragic cases of children being left in hot cars and dying from heat stroke. On average, 37 children in the U.S. die of heat stroke each year after being left in a hot car, according to KidsAndCars.org. While it may be hard to imagine, many deaths have occurred when overstressed parents forgot that their children were in the backseat.

As a Rossen Reports experiment, children were asked to show what they would do in the event of an emergency .TODAY. It's important to remember that not all emergencies may happen at home: Kids need to learn how to use smartphones and access the keypad.

How to Call 911 . Co-authored by wikiHow Staff | Reader-Approved. 911 is meant to connect you to help in serious emergencies . Get on the line, and let the 911 dispatcher know what the emergency is. If you have children , it is also a good idea to make contact information for parents or guardians An “In Case of Emergency ” (ICE) contact is someone you would like contacted in the event you are

As a Rossen Reports experiment, children were asked to show what they would do in the event of an emergency. © TODAY As a Rossen Reports experiment, children were asked to show what they would do in the event of an emergency. In an emergency, would your child know how to call for help? When real moms put their kids to the test on camera, the results are revealing.

As parents, we drill it into our kids: "If there's ever an emergency and you need help, call 911." They learn about it in school, too.

"This should be the very first thing that a child learns when they know how to speak: where they live, their names, and what to do in an event of an emergency," Sgt. Tony Montanari from the Nutley, New Jersey police department told TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen.

5-Year-Old Boy Saves Pregnant Mom's Life By Remembering Catchy Jingle

  5-Year-Old Boy Saves Pregnant Mom's Life By Remembering Catchy Jingle Kristi Bailey collapsed in her home on May 3, but her 5-year-old son Jackson knew exactly how to help.When the Ohio mom collapsed in her home on May 3, her 5-year-old son Jackson knew exactly how to help.

How do you know if your kids know who to call during an emergency . Parent Toolkit provides parents with a comprehensive guide to helping their children succeed in school and life, whether they’re just starting out in pre-school or preparing their college applications.

Kids learn it from both their parents and teachers: If there’s ever an emergency , they should call 911 . Simple, right? Maybe not, a Rossen Reports

It's just three little numbers. We assume they'll remember and know what to do. But will they?

As an experiment, the Rossen Reports team set up cameras in a suburban home where real moms asked their own kids to demonstrate what they would do in an emergency. Rossen and Montanari watched on a monitor.

The results were revealing: Out of all the kids in the experiment, only one knew exactly what to do.

It's important to remember that not all emergencies may happen at home: Kids need to learn how to use smartphones and access the keypad.

Another important tip: Teach your kids to always look at their surroundings. If they call 911, they need to be able to describe what's around them, read street signs, describe the house. That way emergency teams get to you even faster

Rossen Reports © TODAY Rossen Reports

Protect Your Child from Dangerous Medications .
More than 70,000 children are seen in the ER each year because of unintentional medication poisoning. ER physician Dr. Travis Stork is joined by ER physician Dr. Darria Long Gillespie to warn you about prescription drugs that can have tragic consequences.Dr. Long Gillespie explains that prescription narcotic painkillers are “The number-one group cause of death from medication in children under five.” Children who ingest narcotic pain medication may seem lethargic or sleepy, with slowed breathing. “If you suspect your child has a narcotic overdose, we do have a reversal agent,” adds Dr. Stork. The key is to seek help immediately.

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