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Health & Fit The One Symptom of COVID-19 That is Scaring Even Doctors

15:23  29 july  2020
15:23  29 july  2020 Source:   eatthis.com

Generation C? What experts are saying about kids born into the coronavirus pandemic

  Generation C? What experts are saying about kids born into the coronavirus pandemic Pandemics like coronavirus can be generation-defining events, but experts say it's too early to create a label for those coming after Gen Z.The global health crisis could go down in history like a war of sorts — a major factor called a period event that demographers use to help define generations, according to Pew Research Center. For Gen Z, (usually defined as those born between 1997 and 2012) "coronavirus is the generation-defining moment," according to Jason Dorsey, president of the Center for Generational Kinetics, a research and strategy firm focused on Gen Z and millennials.

Symptoms of COVID - 19 range from mild to severe. COVID - 19 is a respiratory condition caused by a coronavirus. Some people are infected but don’t If you think you’ve come into contact with the virus, or if you have symptoms , isolate yourself and check your temperature every morning and evening

COVID - 19 , short for "coronavirus disease 2019," is the official name given by the World Health That was true before we had the recent outbreak of COVID - 19 , and it will still be true after it is over. A person infected with coronavirus — even one with no symptoms — may emit aerosols when they talk

Many months into the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers are still scrambling to understand exactly how it attacks and ravages both the body and the mind. While the incredibly infectious and potentially deadly virus primarily wreaks havoc on the lungs, startling statistics and studies, as well as first-hand doctor testimonials, support that it also invades the brain, resulting in a slew of scary symptoms all pointing to one thing: delirium.

Doctors Discover How COVID-19 Infects Your Brain

  Doctors Discover How COVID-19 Infects Your Brain New research out of Johns Hopkins University claims that the coronavirus may actually be able to infect your brain. © Provided by Eat This, Not That! woman with face mask feeling sick and holding her head in pain while measuring temperature at home.

Symptoms of COVID - 19 vary in severity from having no symptoms at all (being asymptomatic) to having fever, cough, sore throat, general It will, however, take many months or even years before any vaccine can be widely used, as it needs to undergo extensive testing in clinical trials to determine

Symptoms of COVID - 19 A lot of people with coughs or fevers might be stressing out these days because they are worried that they have The main symptoms for COVID - 19 can overlapwith those of common illnesses like the flu. And, at least in the northern hemisphere,it’s still cold and flu season

a close up of a person talking on a cell phone: For all you've heard about the coronavirus, so much is still unknown—including why some of us experience certain unusual symptoms while others don't. Certain issues like shortness of breath and fever are explainable—the virus attacks the respiratory system—but others have left doctors scratching their heads on their way to the research lab. Here are the latest symptoms they can't explain—yet. If you know someone affected, share it with them so they know they're not alone. © Provided by Eat This, Not That!

For all you've heard about the coronavirus, so much is still unknown—including why some of us experience certain unusual symptoms while others don't. Certain issues like shortness of breath and fever are explainable—the virus attacks the respiratory system—but others have left doctors scratching their heads on their way to the research lab. Here are the latest symptoms they can't explain—yet. If you know someone affected, share it with them so they know they're not alone.

Some researchers have dubbed the ICU a "delirium factory" as a result of the "life-threatening brain injuries" patients have suffered as a result of coronavirus. These include six symptoms—mental confusion, hallucinations, seizures, coma, stroke, and paralysis—and medical experts aren't exactly sure how to treat them.

The odd, growing list of Covid-19 symptoms, explained

  The odd, growing list of Covid-19 symptoms, explained Fever, Covid toes, and a loss of taste: Why are Covid-19 symptoms so weird and varied?Beyond the most common symptoms of cough, fever, and shortness of breath, patients have reported other troubling maladies: vomiting, rashes, a loss of taste and smell, muscle aches, and even Covid toes.

Symptoms of COVID - 19 can vary from person to person. Symptoms may also vary in different age groups. Some of the more commonly reported While experts know that these kinds of transmissions are happening among those in close contact or in close physical settings, it is not known to what extent.

Taking the necessary steps to prevent SARS-CoV-2 and the symptoms of COVID - 19 are imperative to stopping the transmission. Following the guidelines diligently is important because SARS-CoV-2 is different than other coronaviruses, including the one it’s most similar to, SARS-CoV.

COVID-19 May Cause Brain Damage

A recent study from London's National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, has linked the coronavirus to a number of neurological conditions, including delirium, stroke and brain inflammation. Other scientific studies also support claims that coronavirus may cause brain damage. One study from Wuhan, China, published in JAMA, found that 36 percent of patients suffered neurological symptoms—including headaches, changes in consciousness, strokes, and lack of muscle coordination. A smaller case study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, noted that 84 percent of patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) suffered similar symptoms—one-third of who suffered from "dysexecutive syndrome"—inattention, disorientation or poorly organized movements in response to commands—even after leaving the hospital.

Green tea: an ally against food allergies?

 Green tea: an ally against food allergies? © wenn A new study suggests that drinking green tea may help people with food allergies. Researchers at the University of Shinshu in Japan have found that certain gut microbes can affect the way the immune system responds to certain allergens, and found that the number of flavonoids, a diverse group of phytonutrients, can positively improve bacteria. in the intestine.

COVID - 19 is the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, a new virus that was first recognized in December 2019. Symptoms of COVID - 19 are often similar to other illnesses. That is why everyone, even those who feel well, should follow measures to prevent the spread of COVID - 19 .

The symptoms of COVID - 19 are similar in children and adults. COVID - 19 can look different in different people. For many people, being sick with COVID - 19 If they offer telemedicine visits, find out how those are arranged and any additional information you need. If your child receives any support care

Another recent study published in JAMA found that coronavirus invades the brain, after an MRI of a coronavirus patient who lost sense of smell detected abnormalities. The majority of coronavirus-related brain damage is limited to severe cases, as most of those involved in the published research were on ventilators.

No Treatment Yet

While they have established a connection between brain damage and the virus, researchers are still unsure exactly how exactly it is occurring. "Right now, we actually don't know enough to say definitely how COVID-19 affects the brain and nervous system," Sherry Chou, MD, an associate professor of critical care medicine, neurology and neurosurgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, who is leading an international study of neurological effects of the virus, told Kaiser Health News. "Until we can answer some of the most fundamental questions, it would be too early to speculate on treatments."

In the paper that coined the "delirium factory" term, published in the medical journal Critical Care, the authors hypothesized a number of possibilities. "In patients with COVID-19, delirium may be a manifestation of direct central nervous system (CNS) invasion, induction of CNS inflammatory mediators, a secondary effect of other organ system failure, an effect of sedative strategies, prolonged mechanical ventilation time, or environmental factors, including social isolation," they wrote.

Dr. Fauci Just Warned of This 'Very Disturbing' COVID Symptom

  Dr. Fauci Just Warned of This 'Very Disturbing' COVID Symptom “We're see more and more people who recover from the viral part of it, and then weeks later, they feel weak, they feel tired, they feel short of breath.”Ever since COVID-19 reared its ugly head and upended our world, long-lasting symptoms of the virus have been varied and hard to pinpoint—until now. "A survey conducted by Dr. Natalie Lambert of Indiana University School of Medicine and Survivor Corps analyzed the long-term experiences COVID-19 survivors are having with the virus. The COVID-19 'Long Hauler' Symptoms Survey Report identified 98 long-lasting symptoms." Click through from least common to most common to see if you've experienced any.

One man has explained his painful symptoms of the COVID - 19 infection, including how his ears felt like they were going to "pop", as well as the classic The cough came first, and Reed explained that it felt like a cold had run down into his chest. He had a "hacking cough", despite his throat feeling like it

In some severely ill covid - 19 patients, doctors have found high levels of a pro-inflammatory cytokine called interleukin-6 One study found that half of covid - 19 patients have gastrointestinal symptoms , and specialists have coined the hashtag #NotJustCough for social media to raise awareness of them.

While doctors would normally make neurological complications a priority, the virus complicates everything from initial diagnosis to treatment options. For example, some patients are too sick to travel across the hospital for an MRI and doctors are concerned about contaminating equipment or infecting other healthcare workers. "Our hands are much more tied right now than before the pandemic," said Dr. Chou. Kevin Sheth, MD, a professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the Yale School of Medicine, added that strokes can also go unnoticed, especially when patients are heavily sedated.

Other Elements Contribute to Mental Decline

In the Critical Care paper, researchers point out that it isn't the virus alone responsible for potential brain damage of coronavirus patients. "The further elements of human isolation, extended time away from family and other loved ones, and other elements of care all form what could be construed as a delirium factory that medical teams must address," they write. In addition to continuing to research the brain-coronavirus connection and improving treatment options, they urge the importance of "whole person care" in order to minimize the overall damage.

As for yourself, do everything you can to prevent getting—and spreading—COVID-19 in the first place: Mask up, get tested if you think you have coronavirus, avoid crowds (and bars, and house parties), practice social distancing, only run essential errands, wash your hands regularly, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don't miss these 37 Places You're Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus.

Gallery: There Are 6 Different 'Types' of COVID and This Is the One You Don't Want (Best Life)

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Here's How Fast COVID Is Spreading in Your State .
Using the rate of daily new coronavirus cases per 100,000 people, you can find out how rapidly COVID is spreading in your state.

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