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Health & Fit OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma pleads guilty in criminal case

06:55  25 november  2020
06:55  25 november  2020 Source:   cbsnews.com

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Purdue Pharma , the maker of OxyContin , has agreed to plead guilty to three federal criminal charges for its role in creating the nation's opioid crisis and will pay more than billion and close States across the country have filed claims topping trillion in the Purdue Pharma bankruptcy case .

Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty to criminal charges over the handling of its addictive prescription painkiller OxyContin , capping a deal with federal During a court hearing conducted remotely on Tuesday before US district judge Madeline Cox Arleo in New Jersey, Purdue pleaded guilty to three

Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty Tuesday to three criminal charges, formally admitting its role in an opioid epidemic that has contributed to hundreds of thousands of deaths over the past two decades. In a virtual hearing with a federal judge in Newark, New Jersey, the OxyContin maker admitted impeding the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's efforts to combat the addiction crisis.

a hand holding a cup: A pharmacist holds a bottle OxyContin made by Purdue Pharma at a pharmacy in Provo, Utah © George Frey / REUTERS A pharmacist holds a bottle OxyContin made by Purdue Pharma at a pharmacy in Provo, Utah

Purdue acknowledged that it had not maintained an effective program to prevent prescription drugs from being diverted to the black market, even though it had told the DEA it did have such a program. The company said it provided misleading information to the agency as a way to boost company manufacturing quotas.

OxyContin drugmaker Purdue Pharma pleads guilty to federal criminal charges

  OxyContin drugmaker Purdue Pharma pleads guilty to federal criminal charges Sackler family members agreed to pay $225 million to resolve civil fines. The company admitted to three felony counts for defrauding the federal government by misleading regulators about its efforts to restrict over-prescribing of the drug and to violating anti-kickback laws by paying doctors to write more OxyContin prescriptions. The flood of opioids resulted in massive costs in health care to cope with addictions and deaths. Your browser does not support this video The total amount the government could seek under the agreement in civil and criminal fines is $8.

Purdue Pharma LP pleaded guilty to criminal charges over the handling of its addictive prescription painkiller OxyContin , capping a deal with federal prosecutors to resolve an investigation into the drugmaker's role in the U.S. opioid crisis. During a court hearing conducted remotely on Tuesday

Purdue Pharma LP pleaded guilty to criminal charges over the handling of its addictive prescription painkiller OxyContin , capping a deal with The criminal violations included conspiring to defraud U.S. officials and pay illegal kickbacks to both doctors and an electronic healthcare records vendor called

It also admitted paying doctors through a speakers program to induce them to write more prescriptions for its painkillers.

And it admitted paying an electronic medical records company to send doctors information on patients that encouraged them to prescribe opioids.

The guilty pleas were entered by Purdue board chairperson Steve Miller on behalf of the company. They were part of a criminal and civil settlement announced last month between the Stamford, Connecticut-based company and the Justice Department.

The deal includes $8.3 billion in penalties and forfeitures, but the company is on the hook for a direct payment to the federal government of only a fraction of that, $225 million. It would pay the smaller amount as long as it executes a settlement moving through federal bankruptcy court with state and local governments and other entities suing it over the toll of the opioid epidemic.

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OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty Tuesday to three criminal charges, formally acknowledging its role in the opioid epidemic that has plagued the U.S. over the past two decades and contributed to the deaths of more than 470,000 Americans.The drugmaker

Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty Tuesday to three criminal charges, formally admitting its role in an opioid epidemic that has contributed to hundreds of thousands of In a virtual hearing with a federal judge in Newark, New Jersey, the OxyContin maker admitted impeding the U.S. Drug Enforcement

Members of the wealthy Sackler family who own the company have also agreed to pay $225 million to the federal government to settle civil claims. No criminal charges have been filed against family members, although their deal leaves open the possibility of that in the future.

David Sackler defends Purdue Pharma family 11:44 © Provided by CBS News David Sackler defends Purdue Pharma family 11:44

"Having our plea accepted in federal court, and taking responsibility for past misconduct, is an essential step to preserve billions of dollars of value for creditors and advance our goal of providing financial resources and lifesaving medicines to address the opioid crisis," Purdue said in a written statement after pleading guilty.

"We continue to work tirelessly to build additional support for a proposed bankruptcy settlement, which would direct the overwhelming majority of the settlement funds to state, local and tribal governments for the purpose of abating the opioid crisis," the statement read.

Purdue Pharma to Plead Guilty, Pay $8.3 Billion Over Opioids

  Purdue Pharma to Plead Guilty, Pay $8.3 Billion Over Opioids Purdue Pharma LP will plead guilty to three felonies and pay $8.3 billion to settle federal probes of how it marketed OxyContin, the highly addictive painkiller blamed for helping spark the U.S. opioid epidemic. The agreement calls for Purdue’s owners, members of the billionaire Sackler family, to make an immediate $225 million payment to the government and for the company to pay $250 million after its bankruptcy is concluded, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday. The remaining amount owed by Purdue will be counted toward the company’s payout to its creditors, court records show.

Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty Tuesday to three criminal charges, formally admitting its role in an opioid epidemic that has contributed to hundreds of thousands of deaths over the past two decades.In a virtual hearing with a federal judge in Newark, New Jersey, the OxyContin maker admitted impeding

Purdue Pharma agrees to plead guilty over OxyContin marketing. The company agreed to pay the massive fines and admit criminal liability, but company executives and the Sackler family that owns Purdue Pharma do not admit to any criminal wrongdoing in the agreement.

Purdue's plea to federal crimes provides only minor comfort for advocates who want to see harsher penalties for the OxyContin maker and its owners. The ongoing drug overdose crisis, which appears to be growing worse during the coronavirus pandemic, has contributed to the deaths of more than 470,000 Americans over the past two decades, most of those from legal and illicit opioids.

Cynthia Munger, whose son is in recovery from opioid addiction after being prescribed OxyContin more than a decade ago as a high school baseball player with a shoulder injury, is among the activists pushing for Purdue owners and company officials to be charged with crimes.

"Until we do that and we stop accusing brick and mortar and not individuals, nothing will change," said Munger, who lives in Wayne, Pennsylvania.

The attorneys general for about half the states opposed the federal settlement, as well as the company's proposed settlement in bankruptcy court. In the bankruptcy case, Purdue has proposed transforming into a public benefit corporation with its proceeds going to help address the opioid crisis.

States Suing Purdue Press for Confidential Sackler Documents

  States Suing Purdue Press for Confidential Sackler Documents States suing Purdue Pharma LP over the marketing of its OxyContin painkiller are demanding access to confidential documents as part of a probe into whether some members of the billionaire Sackler family engaged in misconduct when they managed the opioid maker.More than 20 states said federal prosecutors’ claims tied to a $225 million accord unveiled last month provide a “substantial reason” to believe some of the Sacklers “committed crimes in operating Purdue and secreting its assets,” according to a bankruptcy filing Wednesday. The family members deny the allegations. Those states want U.S.

The attorneys general and some activists are upset that despite the Sacklers giving up control of the company, the family remains wealthy and its members will not face prison or other individual penalties.

The activists say there's no difference between the actions of the company and its owners, who also controlled Purdue's board until the past few years.

Last week, as part of a motion to get access to more family documents, the attorneys general who oppose the deals made a filing of documents that put members of the Sackler family at the center of Purdue's continued push for OxyContin sales even as opioid-related deaths rose.

The newly public documents include emails among consultants from McKinsey & Corp. hired by the company to help boost the business. One from 2008, a year after the company first pleaded guilty to opioid-related crimes, says board members, including a Sackler family member, "'blessed' him to do whatever he thinks is necessary to 'save the business.'"

Another McKinsey internal email details how a mid-level Purdue employee felt about the company. It offers more evidence of the Sacklers being hands-on, saying, "The brothers who started the company viewed all employees like the guys who 'trim the hedges' - employees should do exactly what's asked of them and not say too much."

OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma admits role in opioid epidemic, pleads guilty to federal charges

  OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma admits role in opioid epidemic, pleads guilty to federal charges The new MSN, Your customizable collection of the best in news, sports, entertainment, money, weather, travel, health, and lifestyle, combined with Outlook, Facebook, Twitter, Skype, and more.

The documents also describe the company trying to "supercharge" opioid sales in 2013, as reaction to the overdose crisis was taking a toll on prescribing.

Earlier this year, 60 Minutes chronicled efforts of investigators and prosecutors in the first criminal case to land opioid executives in prison. "The Opioid Playbook" traced opioid drug sales tactics over nearly two decades. It was part of a series examining who is to blame for the opioid epidemic. The series also reported on the Justice Department's largest case ever against a drug distributor, McKesson Corporation, a report titled, "Too Big To Prosecute." And in another report, "Inside the Epidemic", 60 Minutes interviewed a notorious oxycodone pill mill doctor from his Florida prison cell, a segment which revealed the tactics of some pharmaceutical industry enablers who had good reason to believe the drugs were being diverted to abusers. 60 Minutes also spoke to insiders from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Drug Enforcement Agency, who confessed that regulatory, law enforcement, and congressional failures opened the door for companies such as Purdue Pharma, to flood American communities with opioids -- stories we called "The Label" and "The Whistleblower".

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