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Health & Fit This One Symptom May Mean You Have COVID Now

06:35  19 december  2020
06:35  19 december  2020 Source:   eatthis.com

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  The One COVID Side Effect Doctors Can't See Nearly 1 in 5 people diagnosed with coronavirus (COVID-19) develop a mental health issue such as depression or anxiety, a new study has found. © Provided by Eat This, Not That! Sad woman on a sofa. In the report published last week in the journal Lancet Psychiatry, researchers looked at the medical records of more than 69 million people in the US, including 62,000 people diagnosed with COVID-19. They found that 18% of patients developed a psychiatric issue within three months of that diagnosis. About 6% of COVID patients reported a mental health issue for the first time, compared to 3.

COVID -19 has been so difficult to track and prevent partly because it has so many potential symptoms . A cough can be mistaken for allergies; fever and "Smell loss is so common in people with the disease that some researchers have recommended its use as a diagnostic test because it may be a more

Symptoms of COVID -19 range from mild to severe. Here are the signs you should watch for and how to tell if you have COVID -19 or another condition, like COVID -19 is a respiratory condition caused by a coronavirus. Some people are infected but don’t notice any symptoms . Most people will have mild

COVID-19 has been so difficult to track and prevent partly because it has so many potential symptoms. A cough can be mistaken for allergies; fever and body aches can be chalked up to the flu. But experts say one symptom makes it pretty clear you've been infected with the novel coronavirus: A loss of taste or smell. That isn't a typical sign of cold, flu or allergies, while research has found it's very often indicative of COVID-19. Read on to hear more, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus.

a person talking on a cell phone: little girl holding nose © Provided by Eat This, Not That! little girl holding nose

Smell Loss is So Common in COVID Cases

"Of particular interest is the rather frequent occurrence of loss of smell and taste, which precedes the onset of respiratory symptoms," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious-disease expert, earlier this month.

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  Dr. Fauci Sends COVID Skeptics This Fiery Message "Get rid of these ridiculous conspiracy theories and realize this is a public health crisis," Dr. Fauci said. “The data speak for themselves.”Dr. Fauci was asked by the Board about the state-by-state restrictions being implemented. Some are instituting curfews; other stay-at-home advisories. The national government is not tying them together. Earlier this week, Fauci argued for a more "unified approach.

Some people might experience the symptom because of a stuffy nose, which can happen during a cold or the flu. But that would only be temporary. There’s a high incidence of anosmia right now and various studies have associated it with COVID -19. It’s one of the symptoms included on the CDC’s

"Most symptoms of the two diseases are so similar that, short of a test—or two or three tests—it won't be possible to know for sure," science and health In other words, if you haven't lost your sense of smell, don't make the assumption that you 've got the flu, and not COVID . But if you have lost your

According to Scientific American, about 80 percent of people with COVID-19 have disturbances in taste or smell. "Smell loss is so common in people with the disease that some researchers have recommended its use as a diagnostic test because it may be a more reliable marker than fever or other symptoms," the publication said.

On Thursday, ESPN anchor Scott Van Pelt tweeted that he had tested positive for COVID-19 and that a loss of taste and smell was his cue to get tested.

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Reason for symptoms unclear

Experts aren't sure why COVID causes this interruption—only that it is very common.

"We have been researching this data for less than a year. Still, so far, it suggests that the primary attack of the coronavirus is in the nose, in the nasal epithelium, which is the skinlike layer of cells in charge of expressing odors," said Dr. Leo Nissola, MD, last month. "It seems like the virus assaults support cells and stem cells in the nose."

He added: "These cells maintain the balance and signal the brain. In some patients, when infected with COVID, that balance is disrupted, and that leads to a shutdown of neuronal signaling, and therefore of smell."

And this can linger. A July CDC study found that loss of taste or smell lasts for an average of eight days, but some people experience it for weeks after their initial infection.

The One Sure Sign Someone Has Caught COVID

  The One Sure Sign Someone Has Caught COVID The loss of smell or taste is both common and relatively unique to the coronavirus—a fairly sure sign that you've caught COVID-19.However, one symptom is both common and relatively unique to the coronavirus—a fairly sure sign that you've caught COVID: The loss of smell or taste. It's usually the one sure sign someone has COVID. Read on to find out how to spot it, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus.

A new cough, fever and change in smell or taste are the key symptoms that mean you may have coronavirus. Public Health England says about 85% of people with Covid will have at least one . If you have any of these symptoms you should get a test as soon as possible and not leave home for

Symptoms of COVID -19 include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Not everyone with COVID -19 will have all symptoms and fever may or may not be present. While anyone exposed to the virus can get COVID -19, the risk for serious illness ( having to be hospitalized

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How to survive this pandemic

If you experience a loss of taste or smell, or have another sign of COVID-19 infection, the CDC recommends that you stay home, call your doctor for advice, avoid public transportation and separate yourself from other people in your household. If you develop difficulty breathing, pain or pressure in your chest, confusion, the inability to wake or stay awake, or bluish lips, you should contact emergency services immediately.

And do everything you can to prevent getting—and spreading—COVID-19 in the first place: Wear a face mask, get tested if you think you have coronavirus, avoid crowds (and bars, and house parties), practice social distancing, only run essential errands, wash your hands regularly, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don't miss these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

Dr. Fauci Has This Message of Hope for 2021 .
"I will guarantee you this will end," he said. But we all have to do this first.As COVID-19 vaccines have begun to roll out to healthcare workers, Fauci and other public health officials have urged Americans to stay vigilant about protective measures like mask wearing, social distancing and handwashing to stem spread of the virus.

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