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Health & Fit How This Video Game Explains My Spoon Theory for Depression

07:35  04 april  2021
07:35  04 april  2021 Source:   themighty.com

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A woman living with depression describes how she uses the video game "Chibi-Robo" and the idea of using batteries to explain spoon theory for mental illness. To quickly explain Chibi-Robo, it is a game about a tiny robot who cleans for a family and helps different toys along the way. In the beginning, Chibi only has a very small battery that runs out of power quickly and must be recharged by plugging into an outlet. Throughout the game , Chibi gets larger batteries that last longer.

The Spoon Theory is an awesome concept created by Christine Miserandino, the owner of Butyoudon’tlooksick.com. According to her page, it started when a friend at a restaurant asked her what it was like to be sick with Lupus. On days that we homeschool, my spoons are gone. I am mentally exhausted and generally can’t handle any more than that. When I drag myself to church, there’s just not enough energy left to do the housework that day. How Can I Get More Spoons ? According to Christine, you can’t.

icon: illustration of a low battery symbol above a woman’s head as she walks © The Mighty illustration of a low battery symbol above a woman’s head as she walks

I often hear talk of spoon theory as a way to explain the challenges of chronic illness. People argue whether mental illnesses also use spoons. One day as I was struggling after using all my energy to walk the dog, I began to think of my energy and mental illness not in terms of spoons but in terms of one of my favorite video games: Chibi-Robo.

To be clear, I like spoon theory and personally believe it applies to all chronic illness, whether physical or mental. However, I find that the people in my life without chronic illness find spoons to be too abstract to understand. My family cannot comprehend how a simple shower or meal can be draining. I hope that my Chibi-Robo battery theory is a little less abstract and easier to explain to our loved ones and friends.

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Learn all about the Spoons Theory and how it can become a game changer for you and your relationships when you apply it to your fight with severe depression and anxiety. My wife and I both have depression , and for the last year, we’ve been using the Spoons Theory to communicate to each other about our needs and limitations due to our illness. The Spoons Theory was initially developed by Christine Miserandino to tell a friend what it’s like to live with lupus, and it works with any chronic illness.

In this video I explain what " spoon theory " is, and how it relates to mental health and daily life. It's essentially a metaphor for mental and emotional energy that daily activities cost, and how , although everyone is different, some people have less than others due to mental health issues, like depression . Everything we do has a cost, and we have to pay that cost if we want to do anything.

To quickly explain Chibi-Robo, it is a game about a tiny robot who cleans for a family and helps different toys along the way. In the beginning, Chibi only has a very small battery that runs out of power quickly and must be recharged by plugging into an outlet. Throughout the game, Chibi gets larger batteries that last longer. However, each task he performs costs him a different amount of battery power and if he does not recharge soon enough, he faints and ends up in bed. This also happens if he gets hurt; he automatically loses all power and faints.


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I imagine my mental illness as waking up each morning with a Chibi battery. Some days I wake up with a large one and some days only a tiny one. Each task I must perform uses up some amount of my battery and I need to be careful not to let it run dry. Recharging my battery throughout the day is crucial. I might be able to recharge by watching a TV show, reading a book or having a meal. But sometimes, I need a larger recharge that requires a nap. If I do run out of power, I end up in bed for hours or even an entire day. Some tasks are like getting hurt in Chibi-Robo as they drain all my power at once and send me straight to bed. For me, this is often doctor appointments but could be many other tasks for other people. No two people have the same batteries or drain their batteries at the same rate.

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Here is an example of how The Spoon Theory works. It took me a lot of spoons to film and edit this video , so if you like it then please hit the like and share buttons! Danielle Vlogs - My Spoon Theory Explanation - Продолжительность: 5:11 Hypermobility Syndromes Association - HMSA 5 251 просмотр. depression & motivation - Продолжительность: 4:32 Ashton Daniel 2 205 просмотров.

I'm Tom Bilyeu and my goal with this YouTube channel is to introduce you to the people and ideas that will help you actually execute on your dreams. You will learn how to level up your mindset, develop leadership skills in business and in your personal life, and learn how to live to your full potential. His studies have proven that when well practiced these tools can put us on the path to understanding and breaking deep-rooted bad habits and even heal illnesses. The author of Becoming Supernatural explains how to stop your mind from controlling you on this episode of Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu.

In the same way as spoons, people with chronic illnesses have to check in with the amount of power they have in the morning and decide which tasks can be completed on that amount of battery power (or spoons). I have to decide which tasks are necessary and how much battery power (if any) I have left for hobbies and socializing. The hardest part is not knowing how much battery power I will have each day and not being able to plan ahead in case I wake up with a tiny battery. Accepting this uncertainty and the need to recharge without guilt is one of the hardest aspects of my chronic mental illness.

That day, walking the dog had drained my battery completely. I was laying in bed feeling terrible and wondering why some days I cannot do the simplest things such as walking, bathing or cooking. That is when I realized that I had drained my small battery for the day and the best thing I could do was recharge.

What do you do to recharge your Chibi-batteries?

If the Spoon Theory doesn’t work for you, check out this list of other alternative Spoon Theory metaphors.

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This is interesting!