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Health & Fit Improving air quality reduces the risks of dementia and Alzheimer

18:05  28 july  2021
18:05  28 july  2021 Source:   medisite.fr

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Améliorer la qualité de l’air réduirait les risques de démence et d’Alzheimer © Supplied by Cover Media Improving air quality would reduce the risks of dementia and Alzheimer

according to several studies, the improvement of The quality of the air can stimulate brain functions and reduce the risk of dementia. It is the first accumulated evidence that show that pollution reduction is associated with a lower risk of all causes confounded and alzheimer disease. These results were presented at the International Conference of the Alzheimer Association (AAIC) in Denver, Colorado.

The new data showed that a reduction of fine particles and motor traffic pollutants decreased the risk of dementia and slowed cognitive decline in US women over the age of 74, regardless of age. Education, geography or cardiovascular diseases. At the same time, a similar study conducted in France revealed that the reduction of fine particles for a decade was associated with a decreased risk of dementia, all causes confounded, among people over 65 years of age.

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The doctoral student at the epidemiology department of the University of Washington Christina Park and his colleagues discovered that long-term exposure to air pollutants was associated with higher rates of beta-amyloid in the blood. The accumulation of beta-amyloid plaques is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease, and if previous studies have established a link between air pollution and increased beta-amyloid production, we know little about things about the long-term effects of the exhibition. However, this study shows a possible biological link between air quality and physical modifications of the brain that define Alzheimer's disease.

"Our results suggest that air pollution can be an important factor in the development of dementia. Many other factors with an impact on dementia are not modifiable, but the reduction of exposure to atmospheric pollution can be associated with less risk of dementia. Additional research is needed, "explained Christina Park.

Claire Sexton, Director of Scientific Programs and Awareness of the Alzheimer's Association, said: "We have been knowing for some time that atmospheric pollution is bad for our brain and overall health, including a link with accumulation amyloid in the brain. But what is exciting is that we now see data showing that improving the quality of the air can actually reduce the risk of dementia. These data demonstrate the importance of federal and local governments' policies and actions, as well as businesses, which aim to reduce air pollutants. »

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usr: 1
This is interesting!