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Health & Fit Is It Safe to Get a COVID-19 Booster and a Flu Shot at the Same Time?

09:10  17 september  2021
09:10  17 september  2021 Source:   shape.com

Booster shots could be the key to travel — or a roadblock to ridding the world of COVID-19

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Q: For now, the flu vaccine and COVID - 19 vaccine are single products. If you get them separately, is it better to put some time between the two? Pavia: We don't know. There are studies that probably won't be out in time to decide in September. They are looking at whether you get an equivalent I'm going to get my flu shot as soon as it 's available. If I'm due for a COVID booster at that time , I would probably do them together. Q: Do you foresee a point in the future when the predominant strain of SARS-CoV-2 will be one of the components of a flu vaccine , like we did in the past with H1N1, etc?

If COVID - 19 booster shots are approved by FDA and recommended by ACIP, some Americans will not be eligible for their third dose of COVID - 19 vaccine until later. People should go ahead and get their flu shot and then schedule their COVID - 19 vaccine at the proper time .” Andrew Noymer, PhD, did not see any problems with giving the COVID - 19 and flu vaccines at the same time . “The seasonal flu shot is very well tolerated, as is the COVID shot ,” commented Noymer, of the Department of Population Health & Disease Prevention at the University of California, Irvine. He was not involved in

With influenza (flu) season right around the corner, now may be the time to book an appointment to get your flu shot. But with COVID-19 vaccine boosters on the horizon, it's understandable if you have questions in regard to both inoculations — including whether or not it's safe and/or effective to schedule both at the same time.

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Last year, the U.S. saw a decline in flu circulation within weeks of COVID-19 being declared an emergency and preventative measures being put into place, including social distancing and mask-wearing, according to the CDC. However, this year's flu season is anyone's guess, especially as people return to their offices for work or begin traveling more, while the contagious Delta variant continues to spread across the U.S.

The Flu Shot Will Be More Important Than Ever This Year—Here’s When to Get Yours

  The Flu Shot Will Be More Important Than Ever This Year—Here’s When to Get Yours As COVID-19 continues to circulate, protecting yourself from the flu is crucial.Even as COVID-19 continues to spread around the country, it’s crucial to be wary of the flu. Here’s the thing: Flu season was practically non-existent last year because most of the country was under lockdown and following COVID-19 prevention measures. Given that COVID-19 prevention measures also reduce the risk of the spread of the flu, we just didn’t see that many flu cases last year, says infectious disease expert Amesh A. Adalja, M.D., a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

This includes simultaneous administration of COVID - 19 vaccines and other vaccines on the same day, as well as co-administration within 14 days. “But if you’ve had any history or reaction, talk to your provider, your clinician, and if you have any concerns, waiting that 14-day period wouldn’t do harm,” said “If you’re going to get one, I would get the COVID - 19 vaccine for sure.” The event organized by First Timothy Baptist and the Jacksonville COVID - 19 Task Force is at 12103 Biscayne Blvd. from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sunday. The vaccines will be provided free of charge to anyone 12 years and older.

When the first COVID - 19 vaccines were starting to roll out, health experts were still wary about mixing and matching vaccines . The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), at the time , advised everyone to take multiple vaccines a minimum of 14 days apart, out of an abundance of caution. If multiple vaccines are administered in a single day, though, health professionals are advised to administer the shots at different injection sites. “We gathered more information we knew that we could combine vaccines safely and still get good benefits from the COVID vaccine as well as another

Thankfully, the preventative measures that protect you against COVID-19 — such as wearing masks, washing your hands, and social distancing — also work against other respiratory illnesses (i.e. the flu). And an important one of those preventative measures includes (yup!) getting a vaccine. That's why the CDC recommends everyone over the age of 6 get a flu vaccine, just like they recommend everyone eligible receive a COVID-19 vaccination as well. (Related: Here's Everything You Need to Know About Coronavirus and Immune Deficiencies)

With flu season just around the corner — not to mention the future availability of COVID boosters — could it be the time to roll up both of your sleeves? © Getty Images With flu season just around the corner — not to mention the future availability of COVID boosters — could it be the time to roll up both of your sleeves?

COVID-19 Boosters and the Flu Shot

Ok, so you need a COVID booster and a flu shot. But which should you prioritize? And is it ok to get them close together — or even at the same time?

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With COVID - 19 cases once again on the rise, doctors are concerned hospitals could be overwhelmed by both flu and coronavirus cases. That's why they hope you'll get your flu shot this fall. Dr. Scott Joy, the chief medical officer for the HealthONE Physician Services Group, told CBSN Denver the best time to get your Many people may be due to get their COVID - 19 booster shot in October. Dr. Joy says you can get the booster and flu vaccine at the same time . "There is no scientific evidence to say it is not a good idea to get both of them together. From a convenience standpoint, it really makes a lot of

US regulators at the FDA say it ’s too early to throw support behind Covid - 19 booster shots , noting that more data is needed before the agency takes a position, even after President Joe Biden set a hard date for a booster campaign. A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) briefing document published on The statement came after Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna released data that seemed to suggest that because their vaccines lose effectiveness over time , the US government should buy more to administer booster shots . Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech said a third dose of their vaccine

First things first: If you're eligible, get your COVID-19 vaccine ASAP, says Vivek Cherian, M.D., an internal medicine physician affiliated with the University of Maryland Medical System. Additionally, Dr. Cherian recommends getting your COVID-19 booster as soon as you're eligible for that, too. ICYDK, you can likely expect to get a COVID-19 booster shot eight months after your last dose, according to the CDC. (As of publication, the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are the only coronavirus inoculations that will soon be available for boosters.)

You shouldn't hold off on getting your COVID vaccination or booster in order to get your flu shot because, actually, you can get them at the same time.


Video: Can You Get Your Flu Shot & Covid Booster at the Same Time? (Veuer)

"Per the CDC's official guidelines, COVID vaccines can be administered simultaneously with other vaccines on the same day, as well as co-administration within 14 days," says Dr. Cherian. (Reminder: It takes 14 days for your body to build immunity against the virus after being vaxxed.) "If you have any hesitation, however, it doesn't hurt to let the 14-day period run its course and then to get the flu vaccine after," he says.

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Third shots of the COVID - 19 vaccine are recommended for some people, but infectious disease specialist Dr. Isaac Bogoch explains why that's different from a booster , and why you may not need one. In the laboratory, it 's clear that individuals who have compromised immune systems just don't mount the same degree of an immune response to these vaccines , in contrast to people that are not immunocompromised. But also, when you look at people who end up hospitalized with COVID - 19 , it ’s people with compromised immune systems that are more likely to be in that scenario.

The flu and COVID - 19 can result in severe illness, especially for older adults, people with underlying medical conditions and pregnant women. However, young children are at a higher risk of severe complications from the flu than they are from COVID - 19 . “While rare, some children who become The recommendation for getting your flu shot is more specific. “ It ’s best to get your flu shot before flu season starts,” says Dr. Martin. “Mid-September to October is ideal timing .” And if you’re immunocompromised and plan to get the third dose to protect against COVID or a COVID booster

On that note, there are just two reasons you may want to consider spacing them out: First, if you've had any allergic or adverse reactions to vaccines in the past (including the flu shot or the COVID vaccine), it's best to check with your doc before getting them at the same time, says Dr. Cherian. Second, "if you've never had a flu vaccine, or are yet to have a COVID-19 vaccine and are now considering getting one, I'd actually recommend spacing out your vaccines intentionally so if you do get hives (or any other type of allergic reaction) you would actually know which vaccine caused it," says Dr. Cherian. When in doubt, it's always a good idea to touch base with a doctor. (Read more: What Are the Most Common Flu Shot Side Effects?)

Either way, Dr. Cherian strongly suggests getting both vaccines as soon as you're eligible. "The flu and COVID-19 are two different viruses so the vaccine for one is not interchangeable with the other. You should absolutely get both because each individual vaccine provides a level of protection against that particular virus." Sadly, the flu shot won't protect you against COVID-19, so getting both really is really imperative this year.

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  How Effective Is the Flu Vaccine? Experts Explain What to Expect This Year The answer is complicated—but you should get it anyway.If you look at the numbers for how effective the flu vaccine has been at protecting Americans from getting sick with the flu over the past few decades, there is a fairly wide range, from 19% in 2014-15 to 60% in 2010-11. (These numbers mean that, for instance, in 2010-11, 60 percent fewer healthy adults who are vaccinated got the flu compared with those who are unvaccinated.

What to Expect Regarding Side Effects

It's generally safe and convenient for most people to get both shots at the same time, but it's unclear what sort of side effects you might encounter if you opt to get both vaccines at once. "There haven't been any specific studies to determine side effects of simultaneous administration of both influenza and COVID vaccines, so it's really a best guess in terms of a side-effect profile," says Dr. Cherian. (Related: Everything You Need to Know About COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects)

Overall, you can expect similar symptoms as you may have had in the past with flu shots — though "it's possible your symptoms might be slightly more pronounced," he says. "Practically speaking, both vaccines will be administered in different arms, so... both of your arms may be sore as opposed to just one." Common side effects of the flu vaccine — including soreness or redness at the injection site, headaches, fever, nausea, achy muscles, and fatigue — tend to overlap with those of the COVID-19 vaccines and boosters. So, if you've received one or both before, you'll likely know what to expect ahead of time. Neither vaccine should amplify any type of reaction you'd have with the other, and plenty of people — including infants and very young children — commonly receive multiple vaccines at once, so rest assured knowing it's a safe and common practice.

First, Impressive Vaccines for Covid. Next Up: The Flu.

  First, Impressive Vaccines for Covid. Next Up: The Flu. As the world grapples with Covid-19, influenza isn’t getting much attention these days. But the flu’s global impact is staggering: three million to five million cases of severe illness every year, and up to 650,000 deaths. The deadly toll of influenza is all the more striking when you consider that we have had vaccines to fight it for eight decades. But they remain mediocre. A flu shot is good for only one flu season, and its effectiveness typically reaches somewhere between 40 and 60 percent. In some years it’s as low as 10 percent.

What to Expect from this Year's Flu Season

Though the official start of flu season varies by region and from season to season, the severity of the 2021-2022 flu season is difficult for experts to predict at this time, according to the CDC. The organization notes that last year's historic low rates might mean reduced immunity among the general population, resulting in a potentially early and severe flu season this year — yikes.

But "if the Delta variant continues to be rampant this flu season, there's a good chance that the flu will be dampened (as it was last season) as folks are continuing to wear masks due to the ongoing pandemic, therefore reducing the chances of propagating the flu," says Dr. Cherian. "That being said, flu seasons have been notoriously difficult to predict in the past, so ultimately time will tell." (Related: Can Face Masks for COVID-19 Also Protect You from the Flu?)

So by now, if you haven't noticed, getting your flu vaccine is crucial, says Dr. Cherian. Specifically, you should aim to get your flu shot before the end of October (and ideally sooner). With hospitals and health care centers seeing an influx of patients due to the highly transmissible Delta variant, it's especially important to prevent any illness you can. And since COVID-19 boosters are not yet approved for the general population, getting your flu shot now is a great way to heed off one type of preventable sickness.

"I have a strong feeling that COVID is so widespread at this point that it is here to stay for the foreseeable future, be it the ongoing pandemic or a more seasonal virus like the flu," says Dr. Cherian. "With that in mind, we obviously are going to want to continue protecting the population, and with a virus that is constantly evolving and mutating, an annual vaccine may ultimately be the answer — but time will tell." What is known is that both viruses can cause severe illness (such as hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe), which means that vaccination is your best bet to stay healthy and safe in the coming months.

The information in this story is accurate as of press time. As updates about coronavirus COVID-19 continue to evolve, it's possible that some information and recommendations in this story have changed since initial publication. We encourage you to check in regularly with resources such as the CDC, the WHO, and your local public health department for the most up-to-date data and recommendations.

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