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Health & Fit Eating Fermented Foods Both Fights Inflammation and Boosts Immunity, According to a New Study

00:50  26 november  2021
00:50  26 november  2021 Source:   wellandgood.com

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Studies have shown that eating the probiotic strains that thrive in these naturally tangy foods (such as yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi) can boost your overall intestinal and respiratory health and even slash your risk for chronic conditions like type 2 diabetes and heart disease. But until now, there was Thanks to a new study conducted by researchers at Stanford University, we’re now learning that the benefits of fermented foods may be tied to their ability to combat signs of chronic inflammation in the body. To analyze the relationship between fermented foods and inflammation , the researchers

Fermented foods , which are high in live probiotics (also known as beneficial gut bacteria), have long been the darlings of dietitians due to their numerous microbiome-balancing advantages. Probiotic strains found in naturally spicy foods like yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi have been shown in studies to We now know that the advantages of fermented foods may be linking to their ability to battle signs of chronic inflammation in the body, thanks to a new study undertaken by Stanford University researchers. The researchers accidental assigned 36 healthy adults to a ten-week meal regimen that

a bowl of fruit on a plate: benefits of fermented foods © Photo: Stocksy/Susan Brooks-Dammann benefits of fermented foods Packed with live probiotics (aka good gut bacteria), fermented foods have long been the darlings of dietitians thanks to their many microbiome-balancing benefits. Studies have shown that eating the probiotic strains that thrive in these naturally tangy foods (such as yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi) can boost your overall intestinal and respiratory health and even slash your risk for chronic conditions like type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

But until now, there was limited research to show exactly how. Thanks to a new study conducted by researchers at Stanford University, we’re now learning that the benefits of fermented foods may be tied to their ability to combat signs of chronic inflammation in the body.

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A diet rich in fermented foods enhances the diversity of gut microbes and decreases molecular signs of inflammation , according to researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine . In a clinical trial, 36 healthy adults were randomly assigned to a 10-week diet that included either fermented or The two diets resulted in different effects on the gut microbiome and the immune system. Eating foods such as yogurt, kefir, fermented cottage cheese, kimchi and other fermented vegetables, vegetable brine drinks, and kombucha tea led to an increase in overall microbial diversity, with stronger effects from

It has long been known that eating fermented foods such as sauerkraut and kimchi can offer many health benefits but exactly why this is the case has remained something of a mystery. Now, researchers at the University of Leipzig in Germany have found that the beneficial effects may be due to the bacteria found in fermented foods boosting the action of the immune system. They now plan to study D-phenyllactic acid’s effect on the immune system further as well as investigating its effect on fat cells.

To analyze the relationship between fermented foods and inflammation, the researchers randomly assigned 36 healthy adults a ten-week meal regimen that was either rich in fermented foods (including yogurt, kefir, kimchi, vegetable brine, and kombucha) or rich in fibrous foods, like vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts, and seeds. Because both food groups have been shown to support gut health and immunity in the past, they were curious whether the benefits of fermented foods or those of fibrous foods alone would reign supreme.


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“In order to help participants implement these dietary changes in a lasting, sustainable way, the dietitians gave them a guide to each type of food and then allowed them to eat whatever foods within that category that they liked and could find at their grocery store, just directing them to eat six servings total each day,” says Hannah Wastyk, lead author on the study and a PhD student at Stanford in the bioengineering department.

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Pro- inflammatory foods include fried foods , sodas, refined carbohydrates, and red meat. Foods that fight inflammation include green vegetables, berries, whole grains, and fatty fish. What does an anti- inflammatory diet do? Your immune system becomes activated when your body recognizes anything that is foreign—such as an invading microbe, plant pollen, or chemical. This often triggers a process called inflammation . Intermittent bouts of inflammation directed at truly threatening invaders protect your health.

New to sub and fermentation in general, so I hope this doesn't come across as ignorant or naïve. There's a strong link between consumption of fermented food and strong mental health, and increased immunity from the common cold and other common viruses spread about throughout the year. An important concept to keep in mind is that fermented foods are already being broken down by the microorganisms, so your insides don't have to do nearly as much work compared to eating raw foods .

Throughout and after the ten week period, the researchers tracked a whole slate of over 230 different markers of inflammation, and found a striking difference: Across the board, those people who ate the fermented foods showed a decrease in 19 different inflammatory proteins circulating in their blood, while those who ate the fiber-rich diet didn’t show that downward trend at all.

People who ate the fermented foods showed a decrease in 19 different inflammatory proteins circulating in their blood, while those who ate the fiber-rich diet didn’t show that downward trend at all.

What’s more, the researchers also investigated the activity of various immune cells and found that four of them showed less activation among the fermented-food eaters (signaling a less-stressed immune system), in comparison to the same cells in the fibrous-food eaters.

“The reason why we looked at so many different metrics is because we wanted to see that broader inflammatory and immunity trend, and whether it was going up or down,” says Wastyk, “because we know that higher levels of chronic inflammation are present with chronic diseases—so, on the flip side, less overall inflammation reflects a better immunity profile.”

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Eating Fermented Foods Both Fights Inflammation and Boosts Immunity , According to a New Study .

A diet rich in fermented foods enhances the diversity of gut microbes and decreases molecular signs of inflammation , according to researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine. In a clinical trial, 36 healthy adults were randomly assigned to a 10-week diet that included either fermented or high-fiber foods . The two diets resulted in different effects on the gut microbiome and the immune system. Eating foods such as yogurt, kefir, fermented cottage cheese, kimchi and other fermented vegetables, vegetable brine drinks, and kombucha tea led to an increase in overall microbial diversity

Interestingly, the dip in inflammation did show up in a few metrics for certain people within the fiber-eating group—but only those individuals who already had a higher level of microbiome diversity (aka a gut filled with different types of bacteria) when the study began. “Those people likely already had more of the fiber-digesting bacteria flourishing within their microbiomes, so that may be why they experienced a drop in inflammation from eating the fiber diet alone,” explains Wastyk.

The takeaway? Eat both fermented foods and foods with plenty of fiber.

If your gut microbiome isn’t in a well-balanced, diverse place already, the results of this study suggest that eating a fiber-rich diet alone may not be enough to see that drop in inflammation that the researchers found with the fermented-food eaters. Your best bet? Working both beneficial food groups into your diet. (If you don’t consume much of either food group as-is, just ease in and apply moderation to avoid any stomach or digestive issues.)

Luckily, there are many fermented foods that already contain plenty of fiber, too. Try kimchi, sauerkraut, tempeh, and any other form of pickled fruit or vegetable. You can also toss your next salad or roasted veggie platter in a miso-based dressing, or make a smoothie from a combination of fruit and kefir for a healthy dish or drink that checks both boxes. We're particularly partial to Lifeway Kefir, which packs 12 probiotic strains, 11 grams of protein, and 30 percent of your daily calcium needs per serving, and comes in a variety of delicious flavors.

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Bottom line: If you eat fermented foods in order to increase your microbial diversity and also eat fiber to fuel all those different microbes, you could have a synergistic benefit that’s even larger than what we found in the study, says Wastyk. Consider the two groups partners in their gut-healthy, inflammation-reducing efforts—with fermented foods perhaps leading the charge.

To learn more about how fermented foods impact gut health, watch this video:

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usr: 1
This is interesting!