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Health & Fit Eating Too Quickly May Be Bad for Your Health

02:51  15 november  2017
02:51  15 november  2017 Source:   time.com

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Eating too fast is linked to obesity and metabolic syndrome, according to a new study. Lots of research, she says, has shown that eating fast is associated with weight gain and other health issues. “You probably do eat more because you’re eating so quickly .

The link between eating quickly and becoming unhealthy has been known for a while. When you eat quickly , the body doesn’t get a chance to signal to the brain that you are getting full. Faster eaters may also get more acid reflux than slower ones – a study of 10 healthy people asked to eat a

a close up of a knife © Getty Images

When it comes to eating, slow and steady really does win the race.

Preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions in California suggests that people who eat slowly are less likely than speed-eaters to become obese or to develop metabolic syndrome, which encompasses a litany of conditions associated with stroke, heart disease and diabetes.

In 2008, Japanese researchers, led by Hiroshima University cardiologist Dr. Takayuki Yamaji, recruited more than 1,000 healthy Japanese adults. They asked them to characterize their eating speed — slow, normal or fast — and tracked their health for the next five years.

Man stops breathing, 3 others sickened after eating coworker's food

  Man stops breathing, 3 others sickened after eating coworker's food A group of coworkers suffered a variety of health issues after consuming food brought to the office by another employee. Their symptoms were so severe, that four employees were treated at a hospital, including one 60-year-old man who collapsed and stopped breathing outside of the building, Fox 5 San Diego reported.The San Diego Fire-Rescue Department responded to a call on Tuesday from Inovio Pharmaceuticals in Sorrento Valley, and transported the man to a nearby trauma center. Another employee was taken to the hospital by medics, while two others found their own transportation, the news outlet reported.

When it comes to eating , slow and steady really does win the race.

When it comes to eating , slow and steady really does win the race. Preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions in

Eighty-four people were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome during those five years, with a clear connection between eating speed and development of the disease. The incidence rate was 11.6% among fast eaters, 6.5% among normal eaters and just 2.3% among slow eaters. The speedy diners were also more likely to weigh more, have a larger waistline and suffer from higher blood sugar.

MORE: Why Slow Eaters May Burn More Calories

Those results aren’t all that surprising, says American Heart Association spokesperson and NYU Langone cardiologist Dr. Nieca Goldberg. Lots of research, she says, has shown that eating fast is associated with weight gain and other health issues.

“You probably do eat more because you’re eating so quickly. You really don’t have any idea of what you’ve eaten,” Goldberg says. “When you eat slowly, you’re much more aware of your eating. You’re chewing your food properly and you’re also slowing down digestion.” Doing so also helps you feel full.

Man stops breathing, 3 others sickened after eating coworker's food

  Man stops breathing, 3 others sickened after eating coworker's food A group of coworkers suffered a variety of health issues after consuming food brought to the office by another employee. Their symptoms were so severe, that four employees were treated at a hospital, including one 60-year-old man who collapsed and stopped breathing outside of the building, Fox 5 San Diego reported.The San Diego Fire-Rescue Department responded to a call on Tuesday from Inovio Pharmaceuticals in Sorrento Valley, and transported the man to a nearby trauma center. Another employee was taken to the hospital by medics, while two others found their own transportation, the news outlet reported.

Lots of research, she says, has shown that eating fast is associated with weight gain and other health issues. “You probably do eat more because you’re eating so quickly . You really don’t have any idea of what you’ve eaten ,” Goldberg says.

When it comes to eating , slow and steady really does win the race.

Goldberg says it should take at least 30 minutes to eat a meal and adds that eating while working is among the worst things you can do.

“Eat in a situation where it’s conducive to eating — we’re talking kitchen, dining room, restaurant. If it’s at your desk, you really need to not work at the same time you eat,” she says. “Even if it’s as short as a half hour, it’s better than doing it in 10 minutes while you’re answering your email.”

If you tend to inhale your food, you’ll likely need to train yourself to slow down, Goldberg says. She suggests eating with a friend, cutting your food into smaller pieces, chewing more, taking deep breaths and setting your fork down between bites.

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A mindful approach to eating can help you lose weight, but that's not going to happen if you're watching your cellphone (or TV) while you're eating.Americans can’t even eat a meal without having their cellphone closeby, according to a new study reported by SWNS news service.

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