Home & Garden: Marie Kondo Explains Why Tidying Up Is Such Big Part Of Japanese Culture - PressFrom - US
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Home & GardenMarie Kondo Explains Why Tidying Up Is Such Big Part Of Japanese Culture

00:40  12 january  2019
00:40  12 january  2019 Source:   huffingtonpost.com

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Netflix's new show Tidying Up with Marie Kondo strives for simplicity over consumerism, but it's not For those of us who aren't drawn to shows overflowing with such grim schadenfreude, Tidying Up is A Part of Hearst Digital Media Esquire participates in various affiliate marketing programs, which

Marie Kondo at Netflix’s Tidying Up With Marie Kondo screening and conversation at New York’s 92nd Street Y in January 2019. “ Tidying was such an integral part of my daily life,” she writes in her first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up , “ that it wasn’t until the day I started my own

Marie Kondo Explains Why Tidying Up Is Such Big Part Of Japanese Culture © ASSOCIATED PRESS Marie Kondo's first book in the U.S., The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, made The New York Times best seller list.

If there’s one person who knows about tidying up, it’s Marie Kondo.

The Japanese tidying expert gained widespread popularity in the U.S. back in 2014, when her first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, was released. It was a hit, becoming a New York Times best-seller and purchased by millions of people worldwide. The “decluttering guru,” as she’s been dubbed, is now making headlines once again thanks to her newly released Netflix series, aptly titled “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo.”

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Marie Kondo has been a pop- culture phenomenon since her book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying In the final episode of Netflix’s Tidying Up With Marie Kondo , she reiterates this in another way Big -box store devotees can’t seem to explain why they buy 700 rolls of toilet paper one week

I am a tentative Marie Kondo fan. While I don’t fold my shirts into neat rolls or divide my junk As the scholar Fabio Rambelli points out, the Tendai and Shingon schools of Japanese Buddhism argued that nonsentient objects such as nature, the Kondo takes up where these Buddhist philosophers left off.

In the show, Kondo visits the homes of various Americans and helps them organize their belongings using her trademark KonMari Method, which involves categorizing and finding a place for each item, and only keeping the things that spark joy.

Why do Americans love her so much right now?

“In recent years, the United States has seen a rise in mass consumption and urbanization, leading to a ‘more is better’ mindset,” Kondo told HuffPost via email. “However, I believe that a shift toward mindfulness is occurring. We are beginning to give more attention to each item we own and determine the few things that truly matter. I think people’s interest in the KonMari Method coincides with these cultural changes in American society.”

We aren’t quite there yet, though. As Jericho Apo, digital strategist at The Story Of Stuff, a community of people working to change our “consumption-crazed culture,” told HuffPost, we still live in a very consumer-driven economy, heavily influenced by materialism. We often tend to attach our self-worth and values to the things we own as a result of living in this “consumer culture,” he said.

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Japanese tidying expert Marie Kondo has been a household name in the U.S. since 2014, when her book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up made its stateside debut. Her KonMari method — a discipline for organizing your belongings, and, by extension, your life — caught on fast enough that by

Tidying Up also doesn’t address the topic of generational trauma and the way it can shape people’s Somehow, she feels that she should part with it. Kondo then throws Alishia a curveball: “The point of this The other essential point that pervades Tidying Up but mostly goes unarticulated is that home

Basically, we accumulate a lot of stuff, much of which we likely don’t need, and it becomes hard to let go of it. In Apo’s opinion, that’s largely because “we associate the stuff we own with who we are, and what success is.”

Americans spend a lot on things. According to a 2017 report in The Boston Globe, men in the U.S. spent over $26 million on shoes in 2016. That number was even closer to $30 million for women. The Balance reported that retail sales hit a record high of $5.7 trillion in the U.S. in 2017. Somewhat ironically, people have suggested that Kondo’s new show is responsible for increasing sales at The Container Store.

Accumulating and holding onto excess stuff isn’t just an American thing. In her experiences visiting various countries, Kondo said she’s noticed that “everyone around the world has the same struggles with tidying.”

Marie Kondo Explains Why Tidying Up Is Such Big Part Of Japanese Culture © ASSOCIATED PRESS Marie Kondo said the ancient Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, which she described as “experiencing beauty in simplicity and calmness,

Kondo’s tips are largely inspired by Japanese philosophies

Kondo’s tidying methods are not necessarily groundbreaking ― making sure every item in a drawer is visible, for example ― but they seem to have struck a nerve with American audiences.

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Marie Kondo (近藤 麻理恵 Kondō Marie , born 9 October 1984), otherwise known as Konmari (こんまり), is a Japanese organising consultant and author.

Why did Marie Kondo surge in popularity outside of Japan ? I think that Marie Kondo ’s book struck me because it presented a philosophy of tidying up , rather than just practical steps. When I look around Japan though, the idea of enacting such ritualistic processes as a path to self-improvement is

Many are inspired by Japanese philosophies. For instance, there’s the ancient Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, which Kondo described as “experiencing beauty in simplicity and calmness” and said “is considered a virtue in Japanese society.” Wabi-sabi comes from Buddhism and is often described as “the art of finding beauty in the imperfect, impermanent and incomplete,” as House Beautiful notes.

“This does not equate to less is more, rather, it captures the feeling of choosing only the things that spark joy for you,” Kondo said. That feeling of “sparking joy” is central to Kondo’s trademark KonMari tidying method, and Spark Joy is even the title of one of her books.

Kondo says that if something you own ― whether a sweater, a pair of shoes or pair of pants ― sparks joy, you can keep it. If it doesn’t, you can thank it for serving its purpose and let it go.

As John Lie, a professor of sociology in the Center of Japanese Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, explained, “There’s also a long-standing Zen influence on Japanese culture, which valorizes minimalism.”

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Marie Kondo : Why we're obsessed with tidying up . Kondo is the middle child of a middle class Tokyo family: her father is a doctor and her mother a housewife. The Japanese national library, where she spent a day reading about tidying .

Perhaps that ’s why I was so skeptical to watch organizing guru Marie Kondo tackle people’s messes on her new Netflix show, Tidying Up with After watching Tidying Up , I decided to confront one of those spaces. I picked the bathroom to start because I falsely assumed I could ruthlessly sort through

Asia Society explains that Zen, which means meditation, puts an emphasis on using meditative practices “to achieve self-realization and, thereby, enlightenment.”

The Zen influence on Kondo’s practices is evident in the first episode of her Netflix show. In one scene, she “greets” the featured couple’s house, taking them through a sort of meditative process of thanking and appreciating the home for protecting them.

Kondo admitted her observations on the organizational habits of Japanese people are limited to those she’s seen through her work. But she said she thinks “ingenuity born out of the constraint of small spaces in Japan and a love for orderliness are national traits.”

Living spaces in Japan are often very limited, which makes tidying up imperative

“Properties and homes in Japan are tiny!” Kondo said. “I grew up in a house where my family of five would unfold futons and sleep side-by-side in a room of about 13m x 13m. There isn’t much space for storage, so small furniture and appliances are necessary.”

Many individuals in Japan are faced with the challenge of making small living spaces as comfortable as possible, she said. “We obsess about the details in our homes,” Kondo told HuffPost. She also said that lifestyle magazines ― the “catalyst for [her] interest in tidying” ― almost always feature some sort of creative storage solution.

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Cultural insight agency Tokyoesque consider whether Kondo ’s Netflix series is the product of ancient Japanese After all, seeking authenticity in one’s culture is an abstract idea. It is up to each individual how they perceive Marie Kondo ’s show. Viewing it as part of Japanese Shinto tradition is

Marie Kondo | Michael Loccisano/Getty Images. If you’re familiar with organization expert Marie “ Tidying was such an integral part of my daily life that it wasn’t until the day I started my own On her Netflix show and in her book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up , Kondo explains her way of

Americans “tend to have a lot more space,” Lie pointed out. Of course, that’s not always the case, but just consider the sheer size of the U.S. in comparison to Japan: America is about 26 times larger than Japan.

“The Protestant aesthetics of minimalism and asceticism have withered away by and large,” Lie said. “It’s not surprising that Kondo is most popular in Manhattan, San Francisco and other large cities with generally limited living space.”

In her experience tidying overseas, Kondo said, she has “not encountered a country where people line things up to store as neatly or expend as much attention on details as Japanese people do.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

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