•   
  •   
  •   

Smart Living Stop throwing big weddings in the middle of a pandemic. It's not just about you.

15:45  05 september  2020
15:45  05 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

Strict lockdown in Moscow lifted as Russian coronavirus cases approach half a million

  Strict lockdown in Moscow lifted as Russian coronavirus cases approach half a million The COVID-19 outbreak has caused a global shortage of important products like personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer for healthcare workers. The fashion industry has been using its resources to help combat the pandemic. From using workshops to produce face masks to making donations towards relief efforts, here's how brands like Chanel and Canada Goose are helping alleviate the shortages.

Hosting a big wedding during the pandemic puts guests and staff at risk. Your big day isn't more In the spring, it seemed like the pandemic would bring wedding season to a screeching halt. " You 're going to have a risk of transmission, whether it was 25 or whether it was 50" guests at a wedding , he

Stop throwing big weddings in the middle of a pandemic . Traveling in a pandemic is risky, and usually unnecessary, but it ’ s made all the worse by how committed airlines are to making any kind of change very expensive.This week, however, several major U.S. airlines announced they’re doing

a close up of a blue background: Weddings with more than 50 attendees put guests and staff at risk. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Samantha Lee/Insider © Provided by INSIDER Weddings with more than 50 attendees put guests and staff at risk. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Samantha Lee/Insider
  • Some engaged couples are holding weddings with more than 50 guests despite the continued threat of the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Couples who host weddings right now need to be aware of the danger they're putting guests and staff in, and think about how they would feel if someone contracted COVID-19 at their event.
  • People who have attended big weddings over the last few months told Insider they regret going.
  • One guest told Insider she saw a groomsman passing around a bottle of alcohol for the bridal party to drink communally, while neither the bride nor the groom wore masks.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

Mary was dreading Cassie's wedding.

The CDC Just Issued These Big New Guidelines About Coronavirus

  The CDC Just Issued These Big New Guidelines About Coronavirus The CDC announced things to consider to “help determine your level of risk.” Click through to see them, and all the valuable answers.

Stop throwing big weddings in the middle of a pandemic . It ' s not just about you . Traveling in a pandemic is risky, and usually unnecessary, but it ’ s made all the worse by how committed airlines are to making any kind of change very expensive.This week, however, several major U.S. airlines

Validate it, sit in it with them, be that safe space, and then move forward together.” It ' s also important for parents to take care of their own emotions as well. Stop throwing big weddings in the middle of a pandemic . It ' s not just about you .

She knew there would be a risk of contracting the coronavirus if she attended, but she didn't feel like she could miss it. She knew the couple had been planning their wedding for years.

She and her partner decided to go, despite these fears. But they soon proved prescient. Between 50 and 100 guests attended the July event in the Midwestern US, but Mary said only a handful of guests wore masks. She had a panic attack during the reception due to the lack of protection, which added guilt to the already-sizable cocktail of feelings she had about the wedding.

"I think there was a pressure to perform. Nobody wants to be that person at any social event that's sitting in the corner," Mary told Insider. (Mary didn't want to use her and the bride's real names, or disclose where the wedding took place, because she was concerned about how the bride would react if she found out about this story.)

11 Magical Disney Kitchen Items You Need ASAP

  11 Magical Disney Kitchen Items You Need ASAP Pretend you're at the parks or immersed in your favorite film with these Disney kitchen items—Mickey waffle makers, princess aprons, pizza makers and more. The post 11 Magical Kitchen Items Every Disney Lover Needs appeared first on Taste of Home.

Are You An Introvert Struggling With The COVID-19 Pandemic ? While the pandemic didn’t create gender inequality, experts say it has exacerbated it — and in some cases eroded the gains in equality that women have fought so hard for. Stop throwing big weddings in the middle of a pandemic .

But who told you it ’ s their decision? In so many pandemics , has something like this ever Just to get to know it and relate it to the following facts. The assassination of Iranian General Suleiman. He was described by a former CIA agent as “the most powerful agent in the Middle East today” and the main

Her fears became a reality a few days later, when she and her partner heard whispers that someone who attended the wedding was displaying symptoms of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. They decided to get tested because they had been in contact with the person.

They both tested positive.

Just a few months ago, wedding season looked like it would be put on hold

In the spring, it seemed like the pandemic would bring wedding season to a screeching halt. Widespread fear and anxiety about the virus, as well as state mandates regarding large gatherings, made big celebrations feel like a relic from the Before Times.

a woman in a wedding dress: People have started holding big weddings again. Westend61/Getty Images © Westend61/Getty Images People have started holding big weddings again. Westend61/Getty Images

Yet as the months have passed, engaged couples have found ways to hold their big weddings, despite the continued spread of the virus across the US. The Knot defines a wedding with fewer than 50 guests as a "microwedding," but a gathering of that size is still large by public health standards in many states.

MLB, MLBPA reportedly making final negotiation effort

  MLB, MLBPA reportedly making final negotiation effort Are your plants not looking as lush and colorful as you hoped? Make sure you haven't made any of these missteps.

It might come off as "he thinks it ' s just about America", but I'm really just trying not to speak about other countries I don't have the perspective to Go to another corner of the internet and look at stupid or mentally ill people in a walmart in the middle of nowhere having a total breakdown and judge them

Nobody has really tried it , you see. and thats what were trying to do. Questioner: what would you do in case of a war? John: how do you mean? atmosphere that is in The world, you see and when the nazism persecuted the jewish people that wasnt only Hitler, who did it or germany, who did it , but just

New York, which has brought its positive test rate down to less than 1% after being the epicenter of the pandemic, has banned gatherings of more than 50 people, even at outdoor events. Connecticut limits indoor gatherings to 25 people, as does New Jersey.

Some couples have bucked health guidelines altogether to turn their dream weddings into reality, even as states from coast to coast see dangerous case spikes. In late August, an outbreak from a 65-person wedding in Maine was linked to 87 cases and one death, and another recent wedding in Brooklyn, New York was linked to 16 cases.

Whether a couple wants to offset the cost of losing a deposit, doesn't want to delay for a year or two, or simply wants to celebrate with family and friends, these gatherings ignore the ever-present danger — and ubiquity — of the virus, and put guests, staff, and anyone they come into contact with at risk. A celebration can easily turn into a disaster, and there's no way to prevent it.

It's best to approach any event with a mindset of 'harm reduction'

Despite global efforts, we're likely still at least a year away from access to a safe vaccine, according to Dr. Amesh Adalja, a Senior Scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

American Airlines' decision to sell middle seats shows that the pandemic won't lead to more comfortable flights

  American Airlines' decision to sell middle seats shows that the pandemic won't lead to more comfortable flights Despite early hopes that the coronavirus pandemic would mean the end of the middle seat on flights, American Airlines laid that theory to rest.When the coronavirus pandemic brought the world to a standstill, ushered in the age of social distancing, and indefinitely grounded most frequent flyers, the optimists focused on the worst part of modern air travel: the middle seat.

It allows us to put work first when we’re at work and family first when we’re with our families. This is a pandemic , and during a pandemic there is no “normal”. Whatever you need to know that it ’ s OK to drop everything in the middle of that meeting to go straighten out the issue taking place a room over.

No matter how much you try to plan for every possible outcome, disappointment is inevitable when things don't play out how you 'd hoped—especially when it ' s a big life goal, like getting married, moving, or traveling. Looking For Financial Independence During A Divorce … In The Middle of A Pandemic .

Even after a vaccine is proven to be safe and effective, it will be a difficult, red tape-laden process as officials figure out how to distribute it and who will be first in line — particularly since the virus has become a political issue, Adalja added.

Adalja told Insider that it's best to approach any event with a mindset of "harm reduction" for the next year, because there's no way to entirely eliminate the risk of spreading the virus. Weddings, he said, are particularly risky.

People often travel to weddings, giving them the opportunity to bring the virus with them from a hotspot. Guests with mild symptoms might attend despite feeling under the weather because they don't want to miss out on the milestone. And infected asymptomatic guests could expose everyone they come in contact with without even realizing it.

Likewise, elderly and immunocompromised guests might feel like they have to attend. After all, how can they miss out on something that feels like a once-in-a-lifetime event? The engaged couple can tell those guests they don't have to attend, but forcing an elderly person, for example, to choose between risking their life and missing their grandchild's wedding puts them in a terrible position.

Other guests might not want to social distance or wear masks, as neither practice feels celebratory. Those who try might find themselves slipping after a few drinks. It's easy to imagine: you pull your mask off to pose for a photo with a friend, and then forget to put it back on as you head to the dance floor.

COVID-19 Didn’t Kill Weddings. But It May Change Them Forever.

  COVID-19 Didn’t Kill Weddings. But It May Change Them Forever. Lee Hanyo and his now-wife Megan planned to have a big destination wedding in Arizona this May. Then, the novel coronavirus hit. But instead of pushing their marriage back, like many couples in their position have opted to do, the “Phase Green” Pittsburgh, PA natives decided to keep their day, but plan a new, smaller and safer wedding from scratch. “We replanned our whole entire wedding in four weeks,” Hanyo told The Daily Beast. “We ended up getting married at her family’s cabin [in Pennsylvania.] It’s right on the river. It’s really special to her,” he said.

Weddings are also extremely difficult to contact trace, since people scatter to different regions after the event. "It's very hard when you have an exposure at a mass gathering for contact tracing to be effective, because the person was at a wedding with 400 people, they may have so many contacts," Adalja said.

"You're going to have a risk of transmission, whether it was 25 or whether it was 50" guests at a wedding, he said. But "it's going to be heightened at 50. And because it's 50, there may be more people involved and more chains of transmission."

Engaged couples are putting the burden of safety on their guests

a hand holding a cell phone: People have started holding big weddings again. Alexandre Tome / EyeEm / Getty Images © Alexandre Tome / EyeEm / Getty Images People have started holding big weddings again. Alexandre Tome / EyeEm / Getty Images

A wedding is more than just a party. It's a social rite of passage, and its significance makes simply choosing not to attend feel like an unrealistic option. By going forward with the event, engaged couples are putting the burden of safety on their guests.

Amelia traveled to a wedding in the Southeast US in July, which had already been rescheduled due to the virus. (Like Mary, Amelia didn't want to use her real name or share the location of the wedding in case the couple found out about this piece.)

She was concerned about exposure to the virus at the 100-person event, but as a bridesmaid, she didn't feel like she could miss her friend's big day. Though she had antibodies, she was still worried about the possibility of reinfection.

"It felt like peer pressure from the other bridesmaids, too," she told Insider. Members of the bridal party reminded her how difficult postponing had been for the bride, and made her feel as though she would be insulting her friend if she didn't come.

Going on drive-thru dates during the COVID-19 pandemic has rekindled my love of fast food

  Going on drive-thru dates during the COVID-19 pandemic has rekindled my love of fast food "While staying with my in-laws during the COVID-19 pandemic, drive-thrus became the only viable option for a dinner date with my husband."As I got older, my tastes became more sophisticated: cheese-laden roast beef sandwiches from Arby's, the Wendy's suite of loaded baked potatoes, and Taco Bell's Mexican Pizza became my new loves. I learned to tolerate chopped onions on my hamburgers, though it was decades before I came around on mustard.

She and her partner decided to attend the wedding despite their concerns, taking comfort in the fact that masks would be encouraged at the event and that it was an indoor/outdoor venue. But those comforts proved fruitless once they were there.

"They had masks and had hand sanitizer everywhere, but I just feel like no one was wearing the masks," with the exception of a few older guests, she said. Likewise, most of the guests decided to stay inside throughout the day because it was hot outside.

The bride and groom didn't wear masks at all during the day, which didn't do much to encourage other guests to don them. At one point, Amelia even saw a groomsman passing around a bottle of alcohol for the bridal party to drink communally.

"I just thought that there would be a stricter safety policy when I agreed," she said.

A couple who willingly hosts a large wedding during the pandemic is sending the message that their day is worth risking their loved ones' lives

It's thorny to assign blame if someone contracts the coronavirus after attending a wedding. Is it the couple's fault because they're the reason people gathered in one place? Is it the fault of the guest who brought the virus, even if they were asymptomatic? Or is it the government to blame for making it legal for people to gather?

The answer is probably a combination of all three. But at the end of the day, a couple who willingly hosts a large wedding during the pandemic is sending the message that their day is worth risking their loved ones' lives over.

They can take steps to make the wedding safer, but there's no way to get the risk of spreading the virus down to zero.

If you absolutely have to have a small wedding during the pandemic, there are ways to mitigate risk. Above all, the smaller the better. As Adalja told Insider, "The bigger the event is the more likely you're going to have somebody there that's harboring the virus."

Green tea: an ally against food allergies?

 Green tea: an ally against food allergies? © wenn A new study suggests that drinking green tea may help people with food allergies. Researchers at the University of Shinshu in Japan have found that certain gut microbes can affect the way the immune system responds to certain allergens, and found that the number of flavonoids, a diverse group of phytonutrients, can positively improve bacteria. in the intestine.

Simply Eloped, an elopement planning company that offers services in 15 states and Washington DC, is currently limiting its events to 16 guests. The couple and two vendors would also be at the event, so only 20 people maximum are at any of their weddings.

Couples can trim their guest list so only the most important people in their life attend the wedding in person. (For the rest, there's always Zoom.) Although it might be intimidating to think about uninviting guests, there are ways to do it politely.

a person in a wedding dress: Smaller is safer when it comes to events during the pandemic. Micaela Karina © Micaela Karina Smaller is safer when it comes to events during the pandemic. Micaela Karina

Brittny Drye, the editor in chief of Love Inc. Magazine, emphasized communicating openly with guests.

"Leaving your guests in limbo is not good because they have their own lives and they have their own schedules to make," she said. You can inform them via mail, email, or phone call, but it's important to ensure they've received the notice so they don't show up at your wedding unexpectedly.

Drye also recommended making the safety of guests and the wedding staff the focus of the conversation, as people's feelings will be less likely to be hurt if it's clear you're worried about them.

At the event itself, implementing safety measures like mandatory mask-wearing, social distancing, and easily accessible hand sanitizer can help keep guests and staff safe. Holding it outdoors is also better than indoors.

Micaela Karina, a wedding photographer based in the UK, told Insider she only works weddings where she feels safe. She's photographed two weddings over the summer; the other 12 were postponed.

"At both weddings I've shot, the couples dramatically reduced their guest lists — at one, I was even a witness and the photographer," she said. There was hand sanitizer and social distancing at both events, and she wore her mask the entire time.

Karina said she won't work a wedding that isn't adhering to government guidelines during the pandemic, even if that means she loses money. "I would be prepared to reduce their package costs to maintain the safety of my household," she told Insider. "While I might be losing money, money is replaceable. Lives are not."

Read more:

Stop rescheduling your wedding for spring 2021 — the pandemic still won't be over

Here's how to know if you need to cancel your upcoming wedding — and what you should do instead

What everyone gets wrong about elopements, according to an expert

Read the original article on Insider

Green tea: an ally against food allergies? .
© wenn A new study suggests that drinking green tea may help people with food allergies. Researchers at the University of Shinshu in Japan have found that certain gut microbes can affect the way the immune system responds to certain allergens, and found that the number of flavonoids, a diverse group of phytonutrients, can positively improve bacteria. in the intestine.

usr: 3
This is interesting!