•   
  •   
  •   

Travel Why Passengers Prefer the Right Side of the Plane

17:36  10 january  2018
17:36  10 january  2018 Source:   travelandleisure.com

A Delta Flight Had to Turn Around. Twice.

  A Delta Flight Had to Turn Around. Twice. When the plane turned around, the passengers figured it was just airline stuff. Then it happened again.Delta Flight 284 started like almost every other flight these days, with a delay. Eventually the plane took off, but less than half an hour later, something in the plane made a banging noise. Banging noises are bad, generally, and so the plane turned around and headed back to the airport. The passengers were transferred to another plane.

Why passengers prefer the right side of the plane . Duration: 00:42 6/25/2018.

Why passengers prefer the right side of the plane . Duration: 00:42 25/06/2018.

Plane aisle© enviromantic/E+/Getty Images Plane aisle Forget the debate between aisle and window seat. The newest question concerning seat selection is over passengers' preference of a side of the plane.

Air travelers tend to prefer the right side of a plane, according to a small study led by a psychology lecturer at Queen Margaret University and carried out at the University of Edinburgh.

Learn More
2 Savings Accounts Pay 10x What Your Bank Pays
Learn More
Sponsored by MyFinance

Dr. Stephen Darling led a group that surveyed some 32 people as to their seating preferences. All of the participants were right-handed, according to the BBC (a detail that is not surprising given the fact that 70-95 percent of the population is right-handed).

Delta passengers sat on plane for 12 hours before it's canceled

  Delta passengers sat on plane for 12 hours before it's canceled "It was a s--t show"One passenger, Ann Ngo, sat on a plane from 6:30 a.m. to about 6 p.m., the Kansas City Star reports.

Why passengers prefer the right side of the plane . Duration: 00:42 25/06/2018.

Air travelers tend to prefer the right side of a plane , according to a small study led by a psychology lecturer at Queen Margaret University and carried out at the University of Edinburgh. Dr. Stephen Darling led a group that surveyed some 32 people as to their seating preferences .

The researchers changed the orientation of the seating diagram to rule out a preference for a side of the screen and found that participants overwhelmingly still chose the right side of the plane.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, people also favored seats toward the front of the aircraft and those that were not in the middle of an aisle.

"The result clearly showed that the orientation of the plane made no difference to the preference, with most participants still making an active choice to choose seating on the right of the plane," Sergio Della Sala, a member of the research team, told BBC.

“The research shows that people’s preference as to which side they sit on in an airplane is dictated by our mind’s rightward bias in representing the real world,” Darling added.

This Delta flight scare is a reminder why you should never put electronics with lithium batteries in checked baggage

  This Delta flight scare is a reminder why you should never put electronics with lithium batteries in checked baggage Ground crew in Salt Lake City smelled burning from the airplane’s cargo hold before this flight took off.A plane full of passengers traveling from Salt Lake City, Utah to Bozeman, Mont. on Delta Air Lines (DAL)  discovered this in dramatic fashion on Monday. A member of the cabin crew brought a burned toiletry bag that contained lithium battery to show the passengers just how dangerous putting them in cargo can be.

Air travelers tend to prefer the right side of a plane , according to a small study led by a psychology lecturer at Queen Margaret University and carried out at the University of Why don't airplanes have giant parachutes attached to them to save the plane and its passengers in times of emergency?

Why passengers prefer the right side of the plane . A small study confirmed a distinct bias.

A rightward bias has been demonstrated in other studies stretching back decades. A study in 1978 for instance asked passersby to choose between four pairs of identical nylons or four identical nightgowns. They overwhelmingly chose the objects that were on the right side of a department store window, justifying their choice by saying that it was of higher quality, not knowing that the objects were in fact the same.

Airplane passengers have an 80% chance of getting sick on a flight if they sit in the wrong spot, scientists have found .
Suhyeon Choi/Unsplash Data scientists traveled across the US on 10 transcontinental flights to investigate your risk of getting sick on a plane. They found that the people in the row directly in front of and behind an ill person are most likely to get sick.But your likelihood of catching another passenger's illness drops outside the 3-row zone, or if you pick a window seat.There are still plenty of other ways to catch someone's flu, cough, or cold while you're traveling. Passengers who are stuck sitting next to, in front of, or behind a sick person on a plane: beware.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!