Travel: Air Traffic Controllers Association Suing Federal Government - PressFrom - US
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TravelAir Traffic Controllers Association Suing Federal Government

16:41  12 january  2019
16:41  12 january  2019 Source:   travelpulse.com

The government shutdown could spur more flight delays making travel a nightmare, air traffic controllers claim

The government shutdown could spur more flight delays making travel a nightmare, air traffic controllers claim Air traffic controllers across American are working without pay during the government shutdown says the National Air Traffic Controllers Association.

The National Air Traffic Controllers Association sued the federal government on January 11 for "unlawfully depriv(ing)" its union members The suit also argues that the federal government violated the Fair Labor Standards Act for not paying air - traffic controllers and other NATCA members at

Air traffic controllers have joined several other groups of federal employees suing the Trump administration over missed pay for having to work through the ongoing government shutdown. Some 13,000 FBI agents are also affected. The National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA)

As the partial government shutdown continues, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) filed a lawsuit Friday against the federal government.

Air Traffic Controllers Association Suing Federal Government© Getty Images PHOTO: Air Traffic Control Desk (Photo courtesy of Cylonphoto / iStock / Getty Images Plus)

According to KATU.com, the union representing air traffic controllers sued on behalf of its members who have not been paid during the shutdown, which has now become the longest in American history.

The partial government shutdown began on December 22. While some federal employees have been furloughed, air traffic controllers and Transportation Security Administration agents are considered essential employees and must work through shutdown despite a lack of pay.

Pilot: Shutdown adding new risk to air travel

Pilot: Shutdown adding new risk to air travel Air traffic controllers are an essential government service, writes Les Abend, so airplanes are still flying despite the government shutdown. But air traffic controllers are people, not robots, and soon the situation will begin to take its toll, potentially on our safety. As a veteran airline pilot I can confirm that we will all have to be especially vigilant with all aspects of aviation operations the longer this situation continues. The controllers will soon be missing paychecks, and nobody wants to work for free. This will add to the burden of an already stressful job.

Federal air traffic controller union members protest the partial U.S. federal government shutdown in a rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The National Air Traffic Controllers Association said that requiring 16,000 controllers to work without pay violates their constitutional rights and a federal

The National Air Traffic Controllers Association hit the Trump administration with a lawsuit in D.C. federal court Friday, arguing the government has "unlawfully deprived" its members of their wages during the impasse Air traffic controllers sue Trump administration over government shutdown.

“The air traffic controllers, traffic management coordinators, and other excepted aviation safety professionals that NATCA represents remain on the job, dedicated to the safety of every flight, but they don’t know when they will receive their next paycheck,” the air traffic controllers union said in a statement. “If not for the shutdown, NATCA members would have begun to receive direct deposit of their pay into their accounts as of this morning.”

As part of the lawsuit, NATCA claims the United States government is violating the Fifth Amendment by depriving members of their earned wages without due process. The union is seeking a temporary restraining order as a result.

In addition, NATCA officials said the federal government had violated the Fair Labor Standards Act by failing to pay at least the minimum wage to air traffic controllers and other NATCA members who were not furloughed during the shutdown.

How 10 Air Traffic Controllers Likely Ended the Government Shutdown.
In an unprecedented situation, more than 800,000 federal workers spent 35 days employed but unpaid between December 2018 and January 2019. Newly released information suggests that it may have taken as few as 10 employees calling out sick on Jan. 25 to get those paychecks trickling back in. Six air traffic controllers in Leesburg, Virginia, and …

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