Travel: Filmmaker Ken Burns Says Every Country Music Fan Must Visit This Tiny Tennessee Town - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

TravelFilmmaker Ken Burns Says Every Country Music Fan Must Visit This Tiny Tennessee Town

01:55  14 september  2019
01:55  14 september  2019 Source:   travelandleisure.com

New York bartenders calling for investigation after Tennessee city wins Long Island Iced Tea contest

New York bartenders calling for investigation after Tennessee city wins Long Island Iced Tea contest New York bartenders are calling for an investigation after the state lost to Tennessee in a Long Island Iced Tea contest earlier this month.

Ken Burns wasn’t always a country music fan . Burns , who was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1953, has been making documentary films for more than four decades, covering everything from boxing champ Jack Johnson to architect Frank Lloyd Wright in addition to his more blockbuster

First look at new Ken Burns ' ' Country Music ' documentary coming to PBS. When someone says , 'I'm not a fan of country music ,' we just say , 'OK, just watch.' Burns says Stuart and Cash have a particularly heavy presence in the film , and the exclusive clips shared with USA TODAY NETWORK

Ken Burns wasn’t always a country music fan. You might be surprised, given he spent eight years immersed in it for his latest documentary, “Country Music,” which premieres Sept. 15 on PBS. But Burns delights in exploring subjects that really aren’t his thing.

Filmmaker Ken Burns Says Every Country Music Fan Must Visit This Tiny Tennessee Town© Jason Kempin/Getty Images

“I don't like to make films about stuff I know about, and then tell people what they should know. The last time I checked, that’s homework,” he said. Instead, he selects “subjects that tell us [Americans] a lot about who we are.”

Burns, who was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1953, has been making documentary films for more than four decades, covering everything from boxing champ Jack Johnson to architect Frank Lloyd Wright in addition to his more blockbuster offerings. “Country Music” traces the art form’s history from Bristol, Tennessee to California’s Central Valley. Boldfaced interviews in the 16-hour documentary include Roseanne Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Dolly Parton, and Willie Nelson, plus 17 members of the Country Music Hall of Fame who have since died.

Nashville-based country stars love to play tourist at home

Nashville-based country stars love to play tourist at home Tourism comes alive in the Music City during summer, but the thousands who flock here aren't the only sightseers in town.Many Nashville-based stars enjoy playing tourist, too."I've been to the Country Music Hall of Fame a few times and you always learn something new," Russell Dickerson told The Associated Press. "You can't take in all that information at one time going, but like seeing some of Elvis's old Cadillacs, like are you kidding me? It's crazy."He doesn't mind the attention from fans while he's out visiting Nashville landmarks.© The Associated Press FILE - In this May 25, 2018 photo, visitors to the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tenn.

Country Music will chronicle the history of a uniquely American art form, rising from the experiences of remarkable people in distinctive regions of our nation. It will be directed and produced by Ken Burns ; written and produced by Dayton Duncan; and produced by Julie Dunfey—Emmy-award winning

Filmmaker Ken Burns Says Every Country Music Fan Must September marks the 11th Birthday of Harvey Nichols Bristol and they are ready to party! 🎉 Join them for this special four-course dinner with music : buff.ly/2Q2LpHw. Speightstown, a Must - Visit Caribbean Beach Town in Barbados.

Country is “about people who feel their stories aren’t told,” Burns said. “Particularly today, that’s a super, super important thing to realize as we spend a lot of time in the superficial reality of our media culture or computer culture of yes and no, right and wrong, red state and blue state, of making everybody else wrong. And the stories are just good. That's all I do for a living — try to tell a good story.”

Below are excerpts from a conversation with Burns.

Travel + Leisure: Why country?

Ken Burns: "It's the dominant music form in the United States today, and it didn't get there because it's bad. It’s not sophisticated the way jazz is; the songwriter Harlan Howard said it was three chords and the truth. But what that very simple three chords permitted is for the language to be about essential human things. We always make fun of it and talk about dogs and six packs and stuff like that, but it is about birth and death, and love and loss, and loneliness. These are huge, big themes that whether you've got a PhD or you haven't graduated from high school, matter."

The Best Tiny Beach Towns in America—According to You!

The Best Tiny Beach Towns in America—According to You! Adorable, affordable, and blessed with beautiful shorelines? Meet 10 crowd-approved coastal Mayberrys.

But for the filmmaker Ken Burns , the answer is clear. “The fact somebody has walked into country music , that is not of the color that people presume the people of Burns ’ new 16-hour documentary series, Country Music , arrives Sept. 15 on PBS, and covers a century of the genre with the same

Filmmaker Ken Burns talks with inmates before showing a film he made featuring past inmate Merle Haggard and country music Wednesday at San Quentin State Prison. The visit was part of a 30-city tour in advance of the film ’s release. It will air on PBS stations in two four-part installments from Sept.

WATCH: One more reason to visit Tennessee

Tell me some history I might not know.

"We sort of think country must be this lily-white phenomenon, when in fact, the banjo is an African instrument brought by slaves, right? So right then and there, you understand it's a little bit more complicated than people would maybe want to think. And our first episode is called 'The Rub,' which is the friction and spark of energy between black and white in the American South.

This is also, besides the film I made on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, the most feminist film ever. I mean, women are right there at the top at the beginning, singing tough stuff well — like when Loretta Lynn is saying, ‘Don't come home a drinkin’ with lovin’ on your mind.’ When Dolly Parton appeared on the Porter Wagoner Show in the ‘60s, many people thought she was just another pretty girl. And so they would introduce her, ‘just put your hands together for this pretty little girl,’ you know? Well she turns out to be one of the most talented songwriters, along with the most extraordinary voice, along with one of the shrewdest and most intelligent minds who has come out of absolute dirt poor poverty. I mean, her parents paid the doctor who delivered her with a sack of cornmeal."

Jack In The Box Is Now Serving Boxes Of Teeny Tiny Tacos That Come With Creamy Avocado Sauce

Jack In The Box Is Now Serving Boxes Of Teeny Tiny Tacos That Come With Creamy Avocado Sauce We need these nationwide ASAP.

Ken Burns is our great explainer, television's finest illustrator. He's a filmmaker who gives us what we But where is context and commentary from critics and historians like, say , Jewly Hight or Holly But in Country Music , Burns goes wide, not deep; it's rare for any musical excerpt to last more than

Ken Burns ’ ‘ Country Music ’ will appeal to more than just the diehards. “ Country Music ,” the latest opus from documentary- maker Ken Burns , is barely under way when Dolly Parton Haggard is one of the few artists who appears in every episode of the film , dispensing some of the most insightful

Amazing. What sites should people interested in country music visit?

"You're going to go to mecca [the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville]. It accidentally became the place where country music was happening, which was originally to the horror of the Nashville elite, because they were the Athens of the Midwest. They didn’t have any intention of welcoming hillbillies.

If you’re a student of the music, you'd also want to visit Bristol — where down the center line of Main Street, one side is in Tennessee, the other is in Virginia. It was there [in 1927] that record producer Ralph Peer recorded the Carter family and Jimmie Rodgers over a couple of days, the most important thing for Hill Country music. They represent a tension that runs to not just American music, but American life and politics and culture, which is the tension between Saturday night and Sunday morning. The Carters represent the virtues of family and mother and home and the church, and Jimmie Rodgers represents the saloon and messing up. But you can't really have Saturday night without a Sunday morning. And vice-versa."

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Read More

Michigan boy suffers second degree burns in 'fire challenge' .
"I just want everybody to know that these challenges, or whatever they're watching on YouTube, is not worth your risking your life," said Tabitha Cleary, the boy's mother.A 12-year-old Michigan boy is recovering from second degree burns after being set ablaze in what is being described as a social media challenge.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!