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Travel 11 tips for surviving a long-haul flight in economy

18:27  03 november  2019
18:27  03 november  2019 Source:   thepointsguy.com

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We don’t have to tell you this, but flying in economy isn’t exactly a glamorous or enjoyable experience. Sure, it’s totally fine for quick domestic flights , but being contained in a small seat that doesn’t have much recline, pitch or legroom for more than a few hours really starts to take a toll on your body (and Luckily for you, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite tips and tricks so you can walk off your next long - haul flight feeling fresh as a daisy. For more TPG news delivered each morning to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter. Choose your seats wisely. Don’t pick your seat assignment blindly.

However, not all long - haul flights have to be miserable; on one direct flight from Tokyo to New York City, I was nearing the end of a book I was enjoying immensely, and remember distinctly thinking, “No, no, just a little more time!” when the pilot told us over the in- flight PA that we had started our Another tip : Don’t wear contacts for the duration of a long - haul flight ; instead, wear glasses. (Wearing contacts for 14 hours straight is unsafe, according to my ophthalmologist.) Secure Your Stuff. A long - haul flight gives unscrupulous travelers plenty of time to size up the location of your wallet, wait until you fall

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We don’t have to tell you this, but flying in economy isn’t exactly a glamorous or enjoyable experience.

Sure, it’s totally fine for quick domestic flights, but being contained in a small seat that doesn’t have much recline, pitch or legroom for more than a few hours really starts to take a toll on your body (and, let’s be real, your mind). Luckily for you, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite tips and tricks so you can walk off your next long-haul flight feeling fresh as a daisy.

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Surviving a long - haul flight in economy is no easy feat. Here are 20 tips for long - haul flights that will 20 Crucial Tips for Long - Haul Flights in Economy Class. If you want to survive a long - haul Lisa says. September 18, 2019 at 11 :56 am. I’m not sure I agree with the tip about booking two aisle

I’ve survived to fly again and again, and these are my top seven ways to cope during an ultra- long - haul flight Prices for the London-Perth route range from £793 per person return in economy , to a minimum of £4,400 per person return in business class. Sandwiched between those cabins is Premium Economy , commanding £2,050 and up for six more inches of legroom (38, versus 32 inches in economy ), three more inches of recline (nine, versus six inches in economy ), and improved amenities like a larger pillow and more substantial meals.

Choose your seats wisely

Don’t pick your seat assignment blindly. We recommend checking Seat Guru before you click “confirm” — after all, you don’t want to end up smack in the middle of a 2-4-2 configuration or right next to the lavatory, do you? You may also want to consider selecting an exit row seat (just know the pros and cons) for more legroom. But unless you have status, you’ll probably have to pay for the privilege.

Check in early

Didn’t get 22A? Don’t panic. But don’t wait until you get to the airport to check in for your flight, either. During the (usually 24-hour) check-in period, watch the seat map and refresh it regularly — something better could easily open up at this time, and if you’re able to score a window or aisle seat, the quality of your flight will be significantly better.

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Long - haul travel in an airline's coach class can be tough. Click here for 10 great tips on how you can survive the flight . It was effectively a 24-hour flight in coach. Even with Singapore Airlines’ great coach product, which includes ergonomic seats and headrests, great inflight menu choices, and more than 1000 options on its entertainment system, that’s still a long time in a narrow seat.

Traveling in Long Haul Flight in Economy Class and don't know how to Survive ? Looking for Tips to Survive Long Haul Flights ? Here is quick video to share my

Get comfortable

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: Comfort is key when traveling, especially toward the back of the plane. More likely than not, you’re going to want to get some shuteye, so wear clothes that resemble (or at least feel like) pajamas, without actually being, you know, pajamas. You still want to look at least somewhat presentable.

Dress in layers

Travelers should always dress in layers, but this is especially true if you’re on a long-haul flight. Nothing, after all, is more uncomfortable than wild inflight temperature swings. And don’t expect airlines to give you more than a bolt of thin fabric in coach as a stand-in for a blanket, so consider investing in a cozy scarf, wrap or cape that you can easily slip on and off, wear as a sweater or curl up under when you’re trying to sleep.

For men and women, we love Jet&Bo’s “Make Travel Luxurious Again” travel set, which includes a travel wrap, socks and a sleep mask that pack away in a zip-up case that easily fits in your carry-on. And did we mention everything is made of 100% cashmere? You’ll be more comfortable (and feel more extravagant) than travelers flying in the front of the plane. Well, almost.

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Vlogust Day 29 Today's video I'm sharing some tips for surviving a long - haul flight . This can be helpful for those that are doing a long - haul flight for the first time on a solo or group trip. Have you done a long - haul flight internationally before? What are some tips you have? How to Survive Long Haul Flights - Long Haul Flight Essentials - Продолжительность: 11 :43 Wolters World 937 903 просмотра.

But long haul travel doesn't have to be an uncomfortable experience. Here are here are some helpful tricks that'll make economy feel like first class — or in the very least, more enjoyable. 1. Choose your food carefully. One study found that carb-rich foods such as spaghetti, whole grain bread, and This is a no-brainer, but bring enough books, magazines, games, and movies to keep yourself busy instead of relying on the possibly terrible in- flight movie and shelling out for headphones. Reading material is imperative, as there will be at least an hour between take off and landing during which you can't use

Bring your own amenities

On that note, you’re going to want to come prepared. Don’t just show up for your flight with only your bags in tow. Many travelers, including The Points Guy himself, have been known to save first- and business-class amenity kits for trips in the back of the bus.

But you can always put together your own. Whether it’s a great neck pillow, the aforementioned travel set, your favorite sleep mask or a footrest (economy can be uncomfortable for short people, too!), bring items with you that will make you feel “at home” as much as possible. There are a few items that you’ll always want to keep handy, so be sure to create an amenity kit with hand sanitizer, lip balm, tissues, ear plugs and either toothpaste and a toothbrush or, at least, a bottle of mouthwash.

As an aside, I flew seven flights in coach in four days and believe me when I say the foot sling was a game-changer.

Drink water

When you think you’ve had enough water, drink some more. Flight attendants — especially in coach — are somewhat notorious for not handing out enough water, but don’t be afraid to ask for what you need. Air on planes is known for being incredibly dry, and it can really start to mess up your body. You’ll be able to start your trip on the right foot if you’re hydrated and taking care of yourself, so pack a reusable water bottle — like the lightweight Vapur bottles that collapse and lie flat when empty — and fill it up after security.

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Bring snacks

Airplane food isn’t exactly a gourmet dining experience (unless, of course, you’re sitting at the pointy end of the plane). So, pack some of your favorite snacks from home to do away with those pesky hunger pains. Just be mindful of your fellow passengers, please and thank you, and stick to less, well, aromatic foods.

Take care of your skin

Remember what we said about air on planes being really dehydrating? Same principle applies for your skin. Do a moisturizing face mask, apply your favorite creams and oils — whatever you need to do to keep your skin feeling good. You’ll likely never see any of these people again, so put your pride aside and focus on your wellbeing.

Drown out the sound

Splurge on the best noise-canceling headphones money can buy, and then drown out all the gloomy sounds of economy. Slip on the downright luxurious Bang & Olufsen Beoplay H8i or classic road warrior Bose QuietComfort 35 Headphones II and say goodbye to the engine roar, howling babies (and their parents) and the whoosh of the lav toilet flushing. You can thank us later.

Bring some backup

Like we said, you’ll likely want to get some sleep on the long flight (and if nothing else, it’s a good way to pass some time). If you can’t fall asleep easily naturally, it’s not a bad idea to bring a little help with you. Whether it’s melatonin, a dose of Benadryl or something a little stronger — prescribed by your doctor, of course — being able to fall asleep easily can make a world of difference.

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Stock up on entertainment

It’s no secret that many airlines’ inflight entertainment systems aren’t exactly the most entertaining. And they’re certainly not reliable, especially if you’re enduring the long haul in coach. So, download that podcast you’ve been meaning to listen to or every episode of the television series you’ve been wanting to binge. If that’s not your style, there’s always a good old fashioned book that could use some love.

Will your long-haul flight in economy to the other side of the world be the best one of your life? Probably not. Will it be at least bearable — or dare we say comfortable — with these tips in mind? Absolutely.

Featured photo by Caiaimage/Agnieszka Olek/Getty Images.

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