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Travel Woman Involved in Reclining Seat Controversy Threatens to Sue American Airlines

19:10  16 february  2020
19:10  16 february  2020 Source:   travelpulse.com

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Wendi had reclined her seat into a man who was unable to recline his because he was on the back row. He asked her to put her seat up so he could eat his One person said: "I can't believe American Airlines did nothing for this poor woman , but gave this creep a drink." Another added: "If I paid for the

Wendi had reclined her seat into a man who was unable to recline his because he was on the back row. He asked her to put her seat up so he could eat his One person said: "I can't believe American Airlines did nothing for this poor woman , but gave this creep a drink." Another added: "If I paid for the

The woman whose viral video of a man punching the back of her seat triggered a national debate about reclining airplane seats – again – is now threatening to sue, according to reports.

a large passenger jet flying through a blue sky: American Airlines Boeing 737-800 taking off from Chicago O'Hare International Airport© gk-6mt/iStock Editorial/Getty Images Plus American Airlines Boeing 737-800 taking off from Chicago O'Hare International Airport

Wendi Williams said she feels slighted that American Airlines told TMZ that by reclining in her seat she knocked over a drink the man behind her had.

Williams claims the statement is false, defamatory and that the flight attendants were rude to her.

“Please refrain from placing any blame about what happened to me on your awful airline with your rude flight attendant!” she tweeted. “And if I inadvertently spilled a drink on the “man” – I had NO idea that happened.”

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Woman at center of seat recline controversy wants to sue American Airlines . Delta CEO weighs in on viral seat - reclining video. But the fact remains — the option to recline is there. And if the person in front of Williams was reclining in his or her seat — should Williams have to suck it up or pay the

The American Airlines passenger whose video of a man punching the back of her reclined seat went viral this week is now threatening to sue the airline . American Airlines is reportedly refusing to bow to Williams’ pressure, and said she called Thursday seeking compensation, a source told TMZ.

Williams was flying from New Orleans to Charlotte on Jan. 31 when she reclined her seat. The passenger directly behind her was in the last row of the plane and therefore could not recline his seat. He began punching the back of her seat repeatedly; Williams took out her phone and began to take video of the incident.

She uploaded the video on Feb. 8 to her Twitter account after, she says, multiple attempts to have American Airlines “do the right thing.” Williams, who claims she was injured in the incident, apparently was seeking compensation and was infuriated when the man was given a free drink and she was handed a “passenger disturbance notice” when she refused to stop filming on her cellphone.

After uploading the video, a national debate ensued. Both sides weighed in, with many saying the woman had every right to recline her seat while many sided with the man behind her, saying his space was limited because his seat, against a wall, could not recline.

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Woman at center of seat recline controversy wants to sue American Airlines . Wendi Williams, the woman whose reclined seat was repeatedly punched by a passenger on an American Airlines On an American Airlines flight from New Orleans to Charlotte, a passenger became involved in a

air travel, american airlines , passenger punching seat , reclining seats , travel etiquette, man punching woman 's The video reignited the controversy and viral debate surrounding whether or not people should recline their Both parties involved in the incident had support from various users on Twitter.

In fact, even Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian became involved in the argument while being interviewed on CNBC.

Related video: Viral video of seat-punching passenger sparks debate over reclined seats on air planes (Provided by CNBC)

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