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Travel The Reality of Being a Digital Nomad: Women Who Travel Podcast

12:16  12 august  2020
12:16  12 august  2020 Source:   cntraveler.com

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  When should you buy travel insurance versus when to rely on credit card protections? Editor’s note: This post has been updated with current information and experiences. Unexpected overnight stays caused by severe flight delays or cancellations. Buying clothes and other personal items when your checked bags are delayed or missing. Emergency room visits in foreign countries. Sometimes, trips don’t go as planned. And, the troubles listed above aren’t all …Unexpected overnight stays caused by severe flight delays or cancellations. Buying clothes and other personal items when your checked bags are delayed or missing. Emergency room visits in foreign countries.

Another great digital nomad podcast for everyone who wants to break free from the 9-5 and start the life they have always dreamed of. So definitely stuff that is of interest for digital nomads , too. Zero To Travel is a podcast that is interesting for digital nomads and passionate travelers alike.

As there are many travel and digital nomad blogs as many digital nomad podcasts are . I would like to share the list of my favourites, which will be widen with time. Here you can find podcasts on nomadic lifestyle and location independent business, as well as some inspiration for life without

a rocky beach next to a body of water © Patryk Kosmider/Getty

You can listen to the Women Who Travel podcast on Apple Podcasts and Spotify each week. Follow this link if you're listening on Apple News.

View the content here.

With major companies extending remote work through next summer because of COVID-19 and countries like Barbados offering year-long visas to U.S. travelers looking to switch their office view to an ocean view, it's understandable to be thinking about picking everything up and relocating for a bit. While international options are limited, living as a digital nomad (spending a few weeks or months in one place before moving on to the next) is still enticing for many. Because it's not as easy as booking a plane ticket and throwing your stuff in storage, we asked two digital nomads—Cheraé Robinson of Tastemakers Africa and Annette Richmond of Fat Girls Traveling—to share their tips and tricks to making it work. (Admittedly, dating can be difficult when you change addresses every 30-or-so days.) Hopefully, it'll help you start to wrap your head around whether making the jump to a nomadic remote work life is right for you.

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It’s been almost 5 months since we left Canada and started this adventure as digital nomads , and we’ve learned a ton about working remotely and traveling . We share what we’ve learned over the last 5 months, some of the challenges we’ve faced, how we’ve found a routine on the road, and how we

Digital nomads are remote workers who usually travel to different locations. They often work in coffee shops Below, we’ll cover the benefits, job opportunities, and realities of this alternative lifestyle. 5 Benefits of Being a Digital Nomad . 1. You’ll be more productive. There’s no time to waste when you

Thanks to Cheraé and Annette for joining us and thanks, as always, to Brett Fuchs for engineering and mixing this episode. As a reminder, you can listen to new episodes of Women Who Travel on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, every Wednesday morning. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss an episode.

Read a full transcription below.

Meredith Carey: Hi everyone. And welcome to Women Who Travel, a podcast from Condé Nast Traveler. I'm Meredith Carey. And with me as always is my co-host Lale Arikoglu.

Lale Arikoglu: Hello.

MC: With many of us working from home these past few months, turning our dining tables into desks for an indeterminate amount of time, it’s been easy to consider a change of scenery. Some countries are making it easier to do just that with Barbados and Bermuda both introducing visas that let travelers live and work remotely there for a full year. Now we know it’s not as easy as just packing up and hitting the road, so we’ve brought two digital nomads on the podcast this week to tell us how they’ve been making it work. Usually in Ghana but calling in from New York is Cheraé Robinson, founder and CEO of Tastemakers Africa. Thanks so much for joining us Cheraé.

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This is a podcast for digital nomads and aspiring nomads , people who want to be location independent or work remotely.What's a digital nomad ? Black Women Travel Podcast shares the stories of Black women who dare to make travel a priority.

On the Women Who Travel podcast , we chat with Kristie Dash and Christine Amorose Merril to learn the tips and tricks of making the most of a business trip. And thanks for listening to Women Who Travel , a podcast from Condé Nast Traveler .

Cheraé Robinson: Thank you.

MC:

And from her new home in Playa Del Carmen, Mexico, Annette Richmond founder of Fat Girls Traveling Instagram account. And now that this is your second time, a Women Who Travel regular!

Annette Richmond: Right. Thank you so much for having me again. I'm excited.

LA: So to kick things off, as Meredith mentioned, lots of people, especially now at entertaining the idea of moving abroad or working remotely and living the life of a digital nomad. When did both of you know it was the right time to move back when you first started dipping your toes into traveling and working remotely? Cheraé, maybe kick things off.

CR: So I sort of knew that first it would start with like getting a job that would have me traveling all over the place. So prior to launching my own company I worked for the World Bank and actually lived in Mexico City for three years. And when I was living in Mexico City, I was traveling 70 percent of the time. So I was living on a research farm, maybe 40 minutes out of the city. And I was just everywhere. And I tried to get like a "regular job" when I moved back to the states and failed miserably. Like I tell people all the time I became very unemployable, because I just could not just be sitting at a desk all the time, it just wasn't going to work.

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We only got to mention a handful of women digital nomads on this program, if you know some others who are publishing content about entrepreneurship Why we’ve seen a pretty massive increase in the percentage of women in the Dynamite Circle recently. The differences in cultural attitudes regarding

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And shortly after having that epiphany, I started Tastemakers and wanted to be able to sort of recruit from all over the world. I didn't want limits on the kind of people that could help me bring this vision to life. And so that meant me being really flexible and sort of living all over Africa and also building flexibility for the people on my team to do so as well. So this has pretty much been my entire career, whether I did it as an entrepreneur or an intrepreneur, this was a life requirement.

LA: And Annette last time we spoke to you, from what I recall you were in Bali, so clearly you've been hopping around. What Was your path like?

AR: Well, it's actually the opposite of Cheraé. I started a remote job as a fashion stylist. And so I was working remotely for probably a year and a half before I decided to become a digital nomad. And so I was just based in the Bay Area where the company was based and I would go, maybe visit my best friend in L.A., and it was flexible because it was a remote job. I wasn't necessarily taking full advantage of being able to travel internationally or domestically with that position for about two years, maybe two and a half years, into the position. And then after I became an official digital nomad, I ended up leaving that position, because I just didn't have enough time to balance that remote job with building my brand and freelancing as a writer. And so the work that I ended up doing, and the work that I continue to do as a writer is kind of what took me away from that remote position. But getting that remote position is what inspired me to become a digital nomad.

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Nick Danforth is a digital nomad who has reached the Nomad 2.0 state, where he decided to settle down in one of the countries he visited while traveling .

However, as is often the case, the reality has been romanticized. “ Digital nomad ” isn’t a job title but a lifestyle choice—an option now available to many thanks to a trend that’s According to Martina Russo, a travel -loving translator who I spoke to about her nomadic lifestyle, the question you need to

MC: You know, I think a lot of people are trying to figure out if it's the right decision for them. And I think right now, previously those, like you guys are both saying, you had to pick a job that let you be more flexible, that let you really explore while you were also still working. And I think now that people's regular day jobs are giving them the flexibility to live elsewhere for a couple months or make that change more permanent. It seems like it's opened the doors to a lot of people to be able to make that choice for themselves. And I want to know what questions you guys asked yourselves before you jumped into making this decision? I know you were saying it was kind of a lifetime thing Cheraé. But are there any things that you considered about whether or not it was a good idea for you in the beginning?

CR: So I'll sort of answer this less from in the beginning, because that was just kind of a knowing. I was that glued-to-the-Travel-Channel kid. So whatever I did was going to have to allow that. But I think more specifically to COVID, I had a decision to make on whether I would stay in New York. Because I couldn't go back to Ghana, because the borders were closed before I could get out. And so I made this decision to go to Southwest Florida and then I made the decision to just not have an actual home and sort of bop around until the borders of the countries I want to go back to are open.

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And I think for me the biggest question was around what would my son's life looked like? Because I have a 12-year-old. And so it's not like when he was three and four when I would literally just get up and book it and it just did not matter. Now I had to think about, how am I going to educate my son properly. But because of COVID and I've had to figure it out anyway, it almost eliminated the school barrier that had kind of been the one thing that made me feel like I needed to stay in one place. Because I think living abroad is different than being a digital nomad—like they're actually also not the same thing, at least in my mind. And so I made the decision to be like a no permanent address sort of person only when I felt comfortable with the idea that I could begin to figure out school for a now-seventh grader.

MC: Annette, I feel like your recent life change has been kind of the opposite, which is that you were traveling a ton and then now you have a permanent address.

AR: Yeah. So for the past four years I've been a digital nomad and I definitely agree with Cherae. The thing that makes my lifestyle a digital nomad lifestyle versus living abroad is the fact that all of my work positions are online. And so all of my income is made digitally. And so I can technically move wherever I want while working digitally while other people might have a U.S.-based company that allows them to work internationally or allows them to work from abroad. That's a little bit different than being a digital nomad.

And for me, I never even really thought that this travel lifestyle was something that I could have. I grew up in a single parent home. I had a nine to five job for probably over a decade before I started getting into this travel space. And so for me, I would say the most important question for anyone who is thinking about either working from abroad or being a digital nomad is what's your work style? Do you require a lot of structure in your workday? Do you require lots of scheduling for your lifestyle? Because generally you have to be really good with scheduling when you're abroad. Time changes, time zone differences, all of those kinds of things can slip through your fingers. Opportunities can slip through your hands because you missed a deadline because you're in a different time zone. And so you need to actually make sure that you're the person that can still deliver on deadlines, even if you're hundreds of miles away.

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Some people can only get motivated to work when they're in an office, and I definitely think that this COVID thing has been allowing people to learn that lesson or to see strength in the fact that, "Hey, regardless of where I am, I'm learning that I can be prompt, be professional. I can be in my sweatpants and still write a really killer professional email” or “I can be wearing sweatpants on the bottom and a button-up shirt on top and doing a Zoom interview and be very professional." So for some people, this digital thing is very possible. For other people, they might need a little more structure. They might just work a different way and having something that's so open and loosey goosey might not be conducive to their work style. Maybe it's conducive to their lifestyle, but if you're not able to meet those deadlines, you know what I mean? It's going to be a hard sell for your boss.

MC: I keep thinking about what it would be like to maybe take Barbados up on the visa offer. And I'm like, "I would have to figure out how to have coverups like left and right so I could throw them on over my bathing suit for meetings."

LA: I don't know. I think that tropical background sounds pretty good for a Zoom. Both of you clarified that there is a difference between living abroad and being a digital nomad. And you know, it sounds like you very consciously chose to be the latter. Why? What is it about the life of a digital nomad that is so much more appealing than living abroad, but essentially being in one place?

AR: For me, I personally thrive on being able to create my own schedule, being able to kind of like stack the earlier part of my week with meetings and work and deadlines. And then maybe towards the middle or end of the week, being able to do a day trip or go to the pool or go to the beach, doing things that I can kind of like work on my mental health, or just work on myself a little bit. And so I've really been able to create a flow and a rhythm in my life that kind of allows me to learn more about myself, learn more about the world, but also be able to create content, create written articles and all of those different things that will educate people. Help other people get inspired to travel, encourage other people to travel when we can, when COVID's not preventing us. And so yeah, this whole thing has kind of just led me into the lifestyle that, unlike Cheraé, I never knew that I could have this type of lifestyle and it's kind of something that I've just created for myself slowly, by saying yes to this or saying no to that, you know?

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CR: I think from my side it just came down to motivation. The first time I actually lived abroad was when I went to Mexico. I remember feeling being away from everything that was comfortable to me was liberating and ways that I hadn't counted on. And I realized there was so much of what I would do on a day-to-day basis that wasn't about me sort of really reaching inward and sort of identifying what makes me tick and what moves me, what inspires me. I was very much sort of doing the things I had been doing and moving to a place where I didn't speak the language and didn't know anything about it. I didn't know anything about Mexico City, because this was like six years ago before it was a thing. So I think that was sort of the start of me thinking that.

And then I realized that I generally like the challenge of getting myself sorted in a new place—less logistics and more understanding the vibe. I liked that in almost, I don't know, probably 40 cities, I have recommendations for food and drinks and things to do and places to party. I would bet stuff on them and I pride myself on being that person. And so I think part of it is also knowing that living in a place is one thing, but visiting for two weeks is also not enough. And I like to know a lot of places. And so I think some of those things sort of speak to the fact that, I mean, I'm an entrepreneur. So, and I have a team, so I don't get to lay on the beach on Friday, mostly because there's someone in Slack pinging me. So Monday through Friday I still have a team to run and a company to run, but I can do that anywhere anyhow. And that for me is just what fills me up, honestly.

MC: So, you know, you were saying that the logistics isn't necessarily your favorite part, Cherae. But I feel like that's such a huge part of someone making this decision for the first time to kind of let go of having an address or having one for more than three months at a time. And I think that can seem really daunting to people. How hard—and equally how expensive—can making this lifestyle change turn out to be?

CR: I think it depends where you go. If you're trying to digital nomad in Africa, you better have your coins stacked, because you're not getting an apartment in Ghana without paying a lease for entire year, that's not a thing. In most places, maybe with the exception of South Africa. So I think where you go is very, very important. Moving to Mexico is a lot different. There are a ton of people that will do a two month lease or a three month lease, especially in places like Playa where Annette lives. One of my really good friends Claire lives in Playa and she loves it because she's in and out of Playa all the time. She's sending me a WhatsApp every day with apartments to try to get me to move to Playa. But I think it really depends on where you're trying to go.

I think the other thing is how you're looking at money, right? And so if you're in a space where, like for me, one of my drivers is like, "I want to buy a house by 40," like that's a thing. So I have a few years ahead of me before I can do that. And so now I'm thinking, "Yes, I want to be abroad because it's cheaper," but it's really easy to spend a lot of money, especially when you're not spending it in your currency. And because your basic needs are usually cheaper than they are in America. I don't know, I find that I turn into like mini baller mode if I'm in a country. I'm popping bottles for no reason, and it's like, "What, you're not doing that at home." But it's like, "How many pesos is it? I don't care." And so I find that I have to reel myself in a bit in this digital nomad life, because what seems like a little bit of money here and there really adds up, especially when you're outside of the matrix, I'll call it. So I think it's not as expensive as people think, but you do have to, in my opinion, be really financially diligent so that if you do have long-term financial goals, you're sort of balancing sort of being wherever you want to be and maybe creating sort of wealth generating longer term investments elsewhere.

MC: I feel like scheduling and budgeting seem like the two top tips to take away from this conversation. Annette, how did the logistics work for you?

AR: I would definitely agree with what Cheraé said, also just from my perspective as a fat traveler, an experience that I can share from recently traveling through Southeast Asia and Asia towards the end of last year, is that I went from the U.S. to India. And so I was planning to be in Asia for six to eight months. And so as a fat traveler, I basically travel with all the clothes that I'll ever need because in Asia and generally abroad, it can be very difficult to get clothing in my size. So I traveled to India, bought some stuff in India, like fabric, saris, all of that kind of stuff. After a couple of weeks in India, went to Malaysia for a month. And my flight, on my flight from India to Malaysia, my luggage was an additional $200 because in the U.S. you pay for like per luggage, so you pay whatever $50 per suitcase. However, in different countries in Asia, it's different. So maybe you'll pay an additional $75 per kilo that's over the 15-kilo maximum. So not only are you paying the $75, every kilo you go over that, you're paying an additional X amount of dollars. So from India to Malaysia, I paid $200 for my luggage. From Malaysia to Thailand, I paid $150 for my luggage. And so this is an additional fee on top of my flight, on top of my accommodation, all of these things. When I went to Bangkok, I basically did a clothing swap and gave away a luggage full of things so I didn't have to pay any more damn luggage fees. But these are unexpected rates, the unexpected fees that come up when you go to India and you find all the amazing fabric it's a nightmare.

MC: Yeah. That's different than being like, "Oh shoot, should I take an Uber tonight instead of taking the subway?" It's like a very different fee situation.

LA: I guess that is the one thing when you aren't living in one place or living in the country you are most familiar with is that there will always be those surprises. Sticking on logistics for a minute, Annette you moved to Mexico last month. I would be interested to know what your timeline was in terms of making, when you decided you were going to make that decision and when you actually got to Mexico?

AR: So it was pretty tricky. My plan was never to stay in the U.S. It was one of those situations where I left Asia for a job in the U.S. and I had about four months of work in the states and then I was going to be moving to Bali for a year. I might have even mentioned that the last time we spoke, because I was tired of being on the road and wanted a dresser drawer and just a place of my own. And so that was the plan. And then COVID kind of changed everything and all of my jobs got canceled. And so it became a situation of how quickly can I find work and stack money. And then, I think Cheraé mentioned, what countries are open? Where can I go? And about a month before I left, I was deciding between either Portugal or Mexico, because I knew people in both places. Cheraé mentioned her friend, Claire. I have actually met and hung out with Claire here in Playa, and I do have a couple more friends here in Playa. And so it was kind of between those two places and then Portugal closed. And then my decision was made. And so I think I bought my ticket maybe two weeks before I came. And yeah, I was off.

MC: Had you figured out an apartment before you got there or was that an on-the-ground, figure it out when you got there kind of thing?

AR: So, social media can be a fantastic tool. I definitely was able to find Facebook groups for retail or real estate apartments, condos and stuff in Playa. And what I did was I kind of saved the places that I liked. I also posted in one of the groups, "Hey, this is my budget. This is the area I'm looking in, and this is when I'll arrive." And so through those I was able to connect with a couple realtors and pin some of the places that I wanted to check out when I got here, I booked a hotel for a week so that I wouldn't rush myself finding a place. And then at first I was like, "Oh, I'm just going to go out here and check out places." And I was on my own, just kind of walking around Playa, sweating, glistening in the sun. And that was trash.

So I decided to find a realtor and basically all of the listings that I wanted to see on my own, she could show me and she could make a commission doing it. And she could also point me to where the nearest grocery store was or where the nearest lavanderia was. And so it made much more sense to go through a local realtor. She was able to kind of show me where the things were in the area that I was looking, and it just kind of streamlined the process so much more. And now that I have people coming down here or friends, people that I know that are looking for more long-term stuff, I can refer them to her, because she was really helpful with me. So.

LA: So I have a question for both of you, living as a digital nomad sounds so deeply alluring, but it also sounds like there's sort of a lot of hustle to it. Does it get exhausting?

CR: It's super exhausting, especially for me. I think I'm going to be honest. My son is so over me, he's so over me. He's like, "If we don't just live one place," now he's 12. And so he's definitely saying, "Mom, really?" So I have to make a pact with him that I'm going to figure out a place I want to live for at least until he's in high school. That's one of the conversations. And then I think the other part of it is the dating part of it. It's super difficult, especially as a black woman, it's just so much. It's like layers on layers on layers of stuff. And so I think between those two things, I know I'll always be a traveler. I'm not convinced I'll always be a digital nomad in the sense that my goal is to make enough money so that I can travel when I want to and do longer term travel.

Especially with everything happening, I do have this call for a sort of a home, even if I'm never there. So even if I'm never there, I kind of want a place where my stuff is that's mine, and I have so much stuff. I love clothes and shoes and so. There's just a bunch of things that are not as sexy.

When I was 22, it was great. I didn't care about any of this stuff. I think now in my mid 30s, I'm like “Eeh.” Or you're talking to guys and they're like, "So where do you live?" And you're just like, "Not really anywhere." And your kid's like, "Mom, what's the deal?" I mean, he's rolling with it, but there are definitely drawbacks. It's still my life and probably going to be my life for the next 12 to 18 months. But there's definitely a part of me that's like, "Hmm. Where, would home base be?" Knowing that it's just a base, knowing I'm never going to just sit in one place forever.

AR: For me, I would say one of the biggest struggles is kind of the interpersonal things, like the birthdays that you miss or the baby showers of your best friends that you miss, or the weddings that you miss being abroad and being, thousands and thousands of hundreds of thousands of miles away. There's lots of life moments in your friends' and family's lives that you're not there for. And sometimes you feel like, did I make the right choice? Or am I being selfish, doing what I want to do for my life, even though I'm feeling disconnected from people whose lives have been a part of mine for so long? And so that is always one of the battles with this lifestyle. It seems very glamorous, it definitely is a hustle. It's also a struggle, specifically emotionally. Outside of the financial stuff, once you can get all that stuff sorted, Cherae also mentioned creating relationships and building lasting bonds. That can be really difficult when you are only in a place for 30 days at a time—and that's generally how I was moving through Asia because of the visas there, you could only stay in the country 30 days before you had to leave. So forming any relationships or dating any of those types of things can be difficult. I've been on the road for over four years now. And, yeah I've dated casually, but you know, I am also 35 now, and I am thinking about starting a family and settling down and having a home base. And so those are all the things that you have to consider.

You know, I definitely, maybe a decade ago, was thinking that I wanted this picket fence with the kids and the dog and the cars and all that stuff. And quickly that went away when I decided to live this outside of the lines kind of lifestyle. But part of me also is hanging on to that kind of traditional dream of the family, and you know what I mean, the home and all of that stuff. So it's also adjusting your expectations of your life. You know what I mean? And I'm at that age in my mid 30s where it's like, "All right girl, what are we going to do? We're going to have a family or not?" We got to start making these decisions, and living this lifestyle as a digital nomad can be counterproductive in those directions.

CR: Unless you find someone that's like, about it, which is my goal. If someone tells me we have to live in the same place forever, then it's not my person. I've just decided. I've left relationships for that very reason. Oh no, that's not going to work. Hard to find, hence being single, but...

LA: They are there, they're just moving too much.

CR: Touche.

MC: If anyone would like to set Annette and Cheraé up on dates, please contact them on Instagram. I'm going to ask one last question before we get to your handles so that people can set you up, which is, what is your biggest piece of advice for people who are just now thinking, "Huh, well, if I don't have to go back to the office, maybe I should hop around"?

CR: I think mine is just, do it, honestly. And it sounds so cliche, but I think this time in the world to me should have shown most people that we're not in control. We're not in control, and we never have been. And so if you're not in control anyway, the thing you can control is yourself. And why not scratch the curiosity? Why not sort of adjust yourself to everything you've ever imagined? And if the thing you've imagined is living somewhere else and being free in that way, then whether you're married, single, whether you have kids or no kids, there's a way to do it. And there's a way to do it at any budget. And this is the time to lean into it. We don't even know what six months from now looks like. And so I really, really think that you should throw convention out the window if that's what's holding you back, because we are in an unconventional place. There’s no use of hoping for a return to what was anyway. It's not going to be the same. And so why sit in fear when you can just do it? And it is, it sounds simple, but the act of committing in your head and putting one foot in front of the other is how it ends up happening.

AR: I love everything Cherae said, and I'm about that life. I also know that we are in the middle of a pandemic and people are overwhelmed with anxiety and doing something so out of the norm might create more stress and anxiety for people. And so I would suggest do it, but maybe in baby steps. And so maybe that looks like doing some house sitting, or maybe doing a house swap for a week or two or a month. Coming up with a way where you first of all feel safe. Second of all, if you have an apartment or a home, that's going to be a lot to kind of just give up and go. So creating opportunity, like maybe a house swap, or if you're going to be house sitting for someone else or something like that, creating an opportunity where there's not very much risk, but you still get to try out the lifestyle and see if it's something that is inspiring to you and something that you're willing to work into your life. Because it is a big risk.

I don't think that right now people can go nomadic in a traditional way, specifically with so many borders being closed right now due to COVID. And so I definitely think that since a lot of us are working from home right now, because of this, it's a great opportunity to think outside the lines a little bit and look for ways and creative solutions to maybe working from someone else's home instead of yours. And then maybe that goes to working in some other state instead of the one where your home is. And maybe that goes into moving to a different country when you can leave your country. So I would say, do it, go for it, start as small as you're comfortable with, or as large as you're comfortable with though. Because we are in a highly stressful time, and adding more stress and anxiety to yourself right now is not advisable.

MC: It's not advisable at all. If people want to keep up with what each of you are doing, where you are in the world, where can they find you on the internet?

CR: So you can find me on my personal Instagram or Twitter @sasyrae, it's S-A-S-Y-R-A-E. You can also find me @tstmkrsafrica on Twitter and Instagram and that's T-S-T-M-K-R-S africa altogether. I'm in both places all the time. I like the internet.

MC: And Annette how about you?

AR: My personal profile is @fromannettewithlove. Annette is spelled A-N-N-E-T-T-E. And so on Twitter it's @fromannettelove. On Instagram and Facebook it's @fromannettewithlove. And then my community is Fat Girls Traveling. You can follow Fat Girls Traveling on Instagram @fatgirlstraveling.

MC: Perfect. I'm @ohheytheremere.

LA: I'm @lalehannah.

MC: Be sure to follow Women Who Travel on Instagram and subscribe to our newsletter. If you're thinking about doing this or have made the jump, please let Lale and I know. We are so curious to hear what you guys are up to. So DM us on Instagram, we would love to hear about your potential jump to being a digital nomad. And we'll talk to you next week.


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The states with and without travel restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic .
Some require travelers to get tested for the coronavirus and self-quarantine for 14 days, while others have no statewide travel restrictions in place. AlaskaThose entering Alaska must be tested for the coronavirus within three days of their departure. On top of that, they have to submit a Self-Isolation Plan and a Travel Declaration. The state requests those entering to get another coronavirus test within 14 days of arriving. For nonresidents, this test is $250. For residents, it's free.ArizonaThere are no statewide travel restrictions in Arizona.

usr: 3
This is interesting!