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Travel 7 of the top European countries to visit this summer

16:15  12 june  2021
16:15  12 june  2021 Source:   thepointsguy.com

Europe Unveils Plans to Open to Vaccinated Americans

  Europe Unveils Plans to Open to Vaccinated Americans The wait is over: American travelers who have been fully vaccinated for COVID-19 may soon enter the European Union, the head of the European Commission said.The European Union “will accept, unconditionally, all those who are vaccinated with vaccines that are approved by E.M.A. (the European Medicines Agency),” Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, told the NYTimes. The three vaccines that have been approved for use in the United States—Pfizer/BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson—have all been approved for use in Europe.

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Yes, it’s possible to travel to many countries across the European Union right now. However, some countries have easier entry requirements than others — especially if you plan to travel with your unvaccinated children. If you can’t wait to get back to Paris or Barcelona or Santorini, we’ve got the info below.

Here are the entry and testing requirements for seven of our favorite European countries for visits this summer.

For more travel news delivered to your inbox daily, sign up for TPG’s daily newsletter.

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In This Post

Croatia

a group of lawn chairs sitting in a harbor: Dubrovnik, Croatia (Photo by Dawid Rojek/Shutterstock.com) © The Points Guy Dubrovnik, Croatia (Photo by Dawid Rojek/Shutterstock.com)

Major air routes: Dubrovnik (DBV) is the principal tourist gateway in Croatia. Delta Air Lines begins nonstop flights four times per week from New York-JFK to Dubrovnik from July 2; and United Airlines will fly nonstop from Newark (EWR) three times weekly from July 8.

COVID-19 test required: Yes, unless the traveler is 14 days past completing their COVID-19 vaccinations (and can show the certificate) or has recovered from an infection

• 48 or 72 hours before arrival

• PCR or rapid antigen test required

Travelers can also test upon arrival (at the traveler’s cost) and self-isolate until receiving a negative result. They must also provide proof of accommodation paid in advance in full (the U.S. Embassy notes this can be just for the first location visited if visiting multiple locations in the country) or they will not be permitted to enter the country.

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Can children enter the country? According to the Government of the Republic of Croatia, “If the child is under 12 years of age (i.e. not 12 years old yet) and traveling accompanied by a parent/guardian, they are exempt from the obligation to present a negative test result and to self-isolate if the parents/guardians have a negative PCR or RAT test result, an EU Digital COVID Certificate, a certificate of vaccination against COVID-19 administered by Member States (valid if 14 days have elapsed since receiving the second dose of the vaccine and of the first and only dose for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine), or If ithey have had recovered COVID-19 and have a medical certificate or a positive PCR or rapid antigen test (RAT) and have been vaccinated with at least one dose of vaccine after recovery, the exemption from presenting a negative PCR or rapid antigen test — RAT or self-isolation is extended until six (6) months after vaccination or if they have recovered from COVID-19 (positive PCR or rapid antigen test result older than 11, but not more than 180 days from the time of sampling or confirmation that they have recovered from COVID-19 issued by a physician, indicating the date of onset of the disease, from which more than 11 but not more than 180 days were to elapse).”

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Other restrictions: Travelers must complete an entry form and have proof of a hotel reservation that is paid in full; those who do not have a valid test result can test upon arrival and self-isolate until receiving the result; masks must be worn in indoor public spaces and outdoors when social distancing can not be maintained.

What’s open: Most businesses, as well as museums, galleries and casinos (with capacity restrictions); restaurants and bars are now open for both indoor and outdoor dining; nightclubs are closed and alcohol sales in other venues must end at 11 p.m; public transportation is running.

U.S. State Department advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Croatia.

France

a large clock tower towering over a city: Paris, France (Photo by V_E/Shutterstock.com) © The Points Guy Paris, France (Photo by V_E/Shutterstock.com)

Major air routes: Paris is the principal gateway to France for U.S. travelers, and airlines are once resuming fuller flight schedules to the country. Here’s a look at air service this summer from major carriers between the U.S. and Paris:

  • Air France: New York-JFK (3x daily); Los Angeles (LAX — 2x daily); Boston (BOS — daily); Miami (MIA — daily); San Francisco (SFO — daily); Washington-Dulles (IAD — daily); Atlanta (ATL — 12x weekly); Chicago (ORD — 5x weekly); Detroit (DTW — 5x weekly); Houston (IAH — 5x weekly); Denver (DEN — 3x weekly); Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP — 3x weekly)
  • Delta Air Lines: Atlanta (ATL — 2x daily); New York-JFK (daily); Detroit (DTW — 3x weekly); Boston (BOS — daily service begins Aug. 5); Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP — 3x weekly service begins July 7)
  • American Airlines: Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — daily service begins Aug. 17); Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW — daily); Miami (MIA — daily service begins Aug. 17); New York-JFK (3x weekly now, service increases throughout the summer); Philadelphia (PHL — daily service begins Aug. 17)
  • United Airlines: Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — 3x weekly, increases to daily Aug. 1); Newark (EWR — daily); Washington-Dulles (IAD — 5x weekly in July, daily beginning Aug. 1)

COVID-19 test required: Yes (only vaccinated U.S. tourist are allowed to visit and they must have a pre-travel test)

Europe to Open to Fully Vaccinated Travelers

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• 72 hours or 48 hours before departure

• PCR test (72 hours) or antigen (48 hours) are required

Can children enter the country? According to Republique Francaise, “The proof of vaccination is not necessary for the journeys of minors accompanying an adult person or persons who have it.”

Other restrictions: Being considered fully vaccinated depends on which vaccine you received; travelers must sign a sworn health declaration and contract tracing form before arrival; there is an 11 p.m. curfew with a fine for breaking it.

What’s open: Indoor dining at cafés and restaurants has resumed at 50% capacity, with a maximum of six people allowed per table; outdoor dining has resumed at full capacity; museums are open with capacity restrictions; many restrictions are scheduled to be eased at the end of June.

As of June 9, 2021, France has reopened to tourists from a handful of nations, including the U.S. Those coming from the U.S. must possess proof of vaccination and a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of to gain entry to the country without mandatory quarantine. Unvaccinated Americans can only enter France for a “compelling reason” or if they are a French citizen or E.U. national.

Related: Traveling to France as a vaccinated American—my experience and what to expect

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The U.S. has been classified as an “Orange” country. Entry requirements for tourism are very straightforward. According to the French Government, vaccinated Americans (and vaccinated travelers from other Orange countries) can enter France with the following:

  • Proof of completed vaccination — the following vaccines are accepted: AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer
  • A negative COVID-19 test: either a PCR test taken within 72 hours of boarding or an antigen test taken within 48 hours of boarding

Note that you must wait a set amount of time after your COVID-19 vaccine in order to enter France. The wait time depends on which vaccine you received: Travelers are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after the second injection for two injection vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca) and four weeks after the injection for single injection vaccines (Johnson & Johnson).

According to the U.S. Embassy & Consulates in France, masks are required in public spaces. Details on all restrictions are available here.

For details on new PCR or rapid antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

U.S. State Department advisory: Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 levels in France.

Greece

a body of water with a city in the background: Crete, Greece (Photo by Gatsi/Getty Images) © The Points Guy Crete, Greece (Photo by Gatsi/Getty Images)

Major air routes: Athens (ATH) is the primary gateway to Greece. Here’s a look at air service on major carriers from the U.S.:

  • American Airlines: Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — daily); New York-JFK (daily); Philadelphia (PHL — daily service begins Aug. 17)
  • Delta Air Lines: New York-JFK (2x daily); Atlanta (daily service begins July 2)
  • Emirates: Newark (EWR — daily)
  • United Airlines: Newark (EWR — daily); Washington-Dulles (IAD — daily service begins July 1)

COVID-19 test required: Yes, or proof of vaccination (Acceptable vaccines: Acceptable vaccines are: Pfizer BioNtech, Moderna, Astra Zeneca/Oxford, Novavax, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Sinovac Biotech, Gamaleya (Sputnik), Cansino Biologics, Sinopharm)

What you need to know about traveling to Europe this summer

  What you need to know about traveling to Europe this summer Last summer, tourists from around the world couldn't get into Europe. This summer many should be able to, though the tangle of entry requirements will vary by country and could change quickly. Here's what you need to know about going to Europe.Here's a guide to help you determine where and when you can vacation this summer in the 27 member countries of the European Union and in non-EU European countries.

• 72 hours before departure

• PCR test required

Can children enter the country? According to Greece officials, COVID-19 testing of unvaccinated people “is mandatory for all tourists (including children over the age of 6), regardless of the epidemiological situation in the country of departure.” Children under the age of 6 do not need a PCR test.

Other restrictions: Tourists are subject to the country’s ongoing restrictions (Greece still has a significant number of COVID-19 cases after hitting record highs in April 2021), which currently involves a 12:30 a.m. to 5 a.m. curfew and a mask requirement indoors and outdoors in public spaces; many restrictions have been eased over the past few weeks, with travel between regions allowed as of May 14, 2021.

What’s open: Hotels and resorts are open; cafes, bars and restaurants reopened for outside dining on May 3, 2021; museums and retail shops reopened on May 14, 2021.

Greece said in mid-March 2021 that it would open tourism to fully vaccinated travelers and travelers with proof of COVID-19 antibodies in May 2021. On Wednesday, April 14, the tourism department said Americans would be welcome as of May 14. Then, on April 19, 2021, Greece began welcoming U.S. travelers earlier than announced after accelerating its plans. Non-vaccinated Americans are also able to travel to Greece as long as they have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival.

Several major cruise lines, including Celebrity, have also said they plan to sail the Greek islands from Athens beginning in late June 2021.

Related: Greece to open borders in May

All travelers eligible to enter Greece (those from E.U. countries along with the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, North Macedonia, New Zealand, South Korea, Thailand, United Arab Emirates, Belarus, Bahrain, Serbia, Russia, Israel, Rwanda, Qatar, China, Kuwait, Ukraine, Saudi Arabia, and Singapore) should expect to adhere to Greece’s “five lines of defense” strategy. Those lines include:

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  • All visitors must be fully vaccinated (14 days or more past completion) or present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival (children age five and under are exempt from testing)
  • A checking system at Greece’s airports and borders, where passengers can be selected randomly to take a rapid test
  • Any visitor who tests positive for coronavirus will be isolated in a “quarantine hotel”
  • All tourism industry workers must be vaccinated (they will move up the priority list once the most vulnerable Greek citizens get the vaccine)
  • Strict adherence to safety protocols such as wearing masks and social distancing.

All travelers must also complete an online Passenger Locator Form (PLF) at least 48 hours before their travel date. The requirement to self-isolate has been lifted for those with a negative test or proof of completed vaccination. Complete details on entry requirements can be found here.

Check the U.S. Embassy in Greece website for additional information.

Related: Can Americans finally go to Europe?

For details on new PCR or rapid antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

U.S. State Department advisory: Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Greece.

Iceland

a herd of sheep standing on top of a mountain: Reykjavik, Iceland (Photo by L. Toshio Kishiyama/Getty Images) © The Points Guy Reykjavik, Iceland (Photo by L. Toshio Kishiyama/Getty Images)

Major air routes: The Icelandic capital, Reykjavik, is the principal gateway to the country. Here’s a look at air service between the U.S. and Keflavik airport (KEF):

  • Icelandair: Boston (BOS — daily); Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — 4x weekly, increasing to daily); Denver (DEN — 5x weekly now, increases to daily); Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP — 4x weekly now, increases to 5x weekly and then daily); Newark (EWR — daily); New York-JFK (daily); Orlando (MCO — 2x weekly begins July 24); Seattle (SEA — 6x weekly now, increases to daily); Washington-Dulles (IAD — 4x daily now, increases to daily)
  • Delta Air Lines: Boston (BOS — 5x weekly increases to daily); New York-JFK (daily); Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP — daily)
  • United Airlines: Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — daily service begins July 1); Newark (EWR — daily)

COVID-19 test required: Not pre-travel, but vaccination or proof of recovery from previous infection are required for all U.S. travelers and travelers will undergo one test upon arrival (at least through June 15, 2021, when entry protocols will be reviewed).

Other restrictions: The only U.S. travelers allowed to enter Iceland as of April 6, 2021 are those who have proof of a completed COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from a previous infection with a confirmed antibody test or a positive PCR test more than 14 days old; all travelers must register before arrival in Iceland.

Can children enter the country? If you or your children are vaccinated — or can show proof of a prior COVID-19 infection — you can enter Iceland. But, if you’re from the United States or Canada and can’t show proof of vaccination or prior infection, you are barred from visiting.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, as well as public transportation; the volcanic eruption on the Reykjanes Peninsula near Reykjavik has resulted in some road closures; the famous Blue Lagoon thermal area reopened to visitors on April 16, 2021.

Iceland had discussed welcoming back American tourists as early as June 2020, but then changed its mind and a ban on American tourists remained in effect through March 2021.

TPG’s Andrew Kunesh booked a last-minute flight shortly after the ban was lifted, but before Iceland’s government decided it needed more time to ensure procedures were in place. You can read his account here.

Related: Iceland is finally ready to welcome eligible Americans

As of April 6, 2021, U.S. visitors are welcome, assuming they meet one of two criteria:

  • A completed AstraZeneca, Janssen (Johnson & Johnson), Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine
  • A previous COVID-19 infection, as confirmed with a positive antibody test or positive PCR test older than 14 days

Visitors need to pre-register before travel and can present an official paper or electronic COVID-19 vaccine certificate that includes the traveler’s name, date of birth, date and location of vaccination, vaccine administered and the manufacturer and batch or lot number, as outlined on this page. Per the revised April 6, 2021 guidelines, vaccinated U.S. travelers will be required to take a test upon arrival (at least through June 15, 2021). FAQs can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

U.S. State Department advisory: Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Iceland.

Ireland — but not until later this summer

a bridge over a body of water with a city in the night sky: Dublin, Ireland (Photo by David Soanes Photography/Getty Images) © The Points Guy Dublin, Ireland (Photo by David Soanes Photography/Getty Images)

NOTE: We are expecting the following rules to change in Ireland in July. We don’t recommend booking a trip to Ireland until those new, relaxed requirements are announced.

Major air routes: Dublin is the primary gateway to Ireland — here’s a look at scheduled air service to and from the U.S. for this summer:

  • Aer Lingus: Boston (BOS — daily); Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — daily); Newark (EWR — daily service begins Aug. 26); New York-JFK (daily); San Francisco (SFO — 4x weekly service begins Sept. 12); Washington-Dulles (IAD — 5x weekly service begins Aug. 13)
  • American Airlines: Charlotte (CLT — daily service begins Aug. 17); Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — daily service begins July 1); Philadelphia (PHL — daily)
  • Delta Air Lines: Atlanta (ATL — daily service begins Sept. 8); Boston (BOS — daily service begins Sept. 8); New York-JFK (3x weekly service begins Aug. 5)

United Airlines: Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — 3x weekly service begins July 2); Newark (EWR — 5x weekly now, 6x weekly in July, daily service begins Aug. 1)

COVID-19 test required: Yes — even if you are vaccinated

• 72 hours before arrival

• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Mandatory quarantine upon arrival (testing can end it early with a negative test on Day 5); travel between counties is banned; a person arriving in Ireland without a negative PCR test faces a stiff fine or six months in jail.

Can children enter the country? According to the Consulate General of Ireland, San Francisco, “Unvaccinated dependants (including minors) traveling with a fully vaccinated person who is exempt from the Mandatory Hotel Quarantine are also exempt from mandatory hotel quarantine and can quarantine at home/at the address given on the Passenger Locator Form.”

What’s open: Hotels have finally reopened to tourists; restaurants are operating with outdoor dining and take-out and delivery only. Check for updates here.

Ireland has been technically open to Americans, but the Irish government has advised against it and a months-long lockdown along with quarantine restrictions has made travel there complicated. The good news: That is changing as the 14-day mandatory hotel quarantine for Americans was recently lifted (U.S. travelers still need to quarantine, but can test out after five days) and testing and quarantine restrictions are scheduled to be lifted for fully vaccinated U.S. travelers on July 19, 2021, if U.S. case numbers remain low. Details on the latest restrictions can be found here.

Related: Americans will be welcomed back to Ireland without quarantine on July 19, 2021

As of Jan. 16, 2021, all arrivals from outside Ireland are required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for 14 days. As of March 26, 2021, travelers from countries listed as “designated states” (which no longer includes the United States) are subject to a 14-day mandatory hotel quarantine, which must be pre-booked and paid for before departure for arrival (reduced to 10 days with testing).

There is a fine of up to $2,860 or six months in jail for arriving without the proper test result upon arrival or for not fulfilling the required quarantine.

For details on new PCR or rapid antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

U.S. State Department advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Ireland.

Italy

a large stone statue in front of Trevi Fountain: Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy (Photo by hocus-focus/Getty Images) © The Points Guy Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy (Photo by hocus-focus/Getty Images)

Major air routes: Rome (FCO) and Milan (MXP) are the principal international gateways for travel to Italy.

Here’s a look at air service this summer between the U.S. and Rome:

  • Alitalia: Boston (BOS — daily service begins Aug. 1); Los Angeles (LAX — daily service begins Aug. 1); Miami (MIA — daily service begins Aug. 1); New York-JFK (daily); Washington-Dulles (IAD — 5x weekly service begins Aug. 1)
  • American Airlines: Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — daily service begins Aug. 17); Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW — 4x weekly now, increases to daily July 1); New York-JFK (3x weekly now, increases to daily July 1); Philadelphia (PHL — daily service begins Aug. 17)
  • Delta Air Lines: Atlanta (ATL — daily); Boston (BOS — daily service begins Aug. 5); New York-JFK (3x weekly now, increasing to daily July 1)
  • United Airlines: Newark (EWR — 5x weekly now, increases to daily July 1)

And Milan:

  • Alitalia: New York-JFK (daily service begins Aug. 1)
  • American Airlines: New York-JFK (daily)
  • Emirates: New York-JFK (4x weekly increases to daily July 1)
  • Delta Air Lines: New York-JFK (daily)
  • United Airlines: Newark (EWR — 4x weekly increasing to daily and then 2x daily)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure

• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Unless U.S. travelers arrive on a “COVID-tested” flight, which requires two additional tests, one before boarding and one after arrival, they are required to self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival and test again; all travelers must fill out a digital Passenger Locator Form.

Can children enter the country? According to the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, “When entering Italy, children aged up to 2 years are exempt from the requirement to take a molecular or antigen swab test.” Everyone else needs to comply with the required COVID-19 testing mentioned above.

What’s open: It varies by region, based on cases and hospitalizations, but most regions are now in the “yellow zone” and many businesses have been allowed to reopen; most museums and cultural sites have capacity restrictions and require reservations in advance; restaurants and bars have reopened for outdoor dining; masks are required in all public places; there is a 12 a.m. to 5 a.m. curfew as of June 7, 2021.

Americans are once again allowed to visit Italy for tourism, according to the U.S. Embassy in Italy. However, the U.S. State Department’s advisory for Italy remains at Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Italy has approved “COVID-tested flights” from the U.S. (on Delta from Atlanta and New York to Rome and Milan and both American and United have just added flights as well) that allow quarantine-free travel. Passengers on these flights, regardless of vaccination status, must fill out the digital Passenger Locator Form, present a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of boarding, take a rapid test just prior to boarding and then test again upon arrival in Italy. With a negative result on all three tests, travelers do not need to self-isolate for 10 days (those who arrive on other flights do need to self-isolate). The latest updates by Italy’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs can be found here.

Related: Italy is reopening: 11 things I learned as a tourist there this week

According to the U.S. Embassy, regions in Italy are divided in a color-coded system—white (very low risk), yellow (low risk), orange (high risk) and red (very high risk)—depending on transmission rates, availability of hospital and ICU beds and other parameters. Different restrictive measures apply to each zone.

The country has been among the hardest hit in Europe and the government imposed an Easter lockdown through April 6, 2021, with some restrictions in certain regions eased since then as infections have slowed.

Related: I was one of the first American tourists to fly to Italy on a COVID-tested flight

Travelers from certain countries are restricted from visiting and others (divided into groups of List A, B, C, D and E) must fill out the digital Passenger Locator Form and provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 48 hours or 72 hours of entering Italy. The new rules also require anyone visiting or transiting from List D and E countries (the U.S. is now a List D country) and not entering Italy on a “COVID-tested flight” to present a negative test result taken within 72 hours of entering Italy and undergo an isolation period of 10 days before taking a second PCR or antigen test. Updates on restrictions can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

U.S. State Department advisory: Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Italy.

Spain

a colorful boat in a body of water: Park Guell in Barcelona, Spain. (Photo by MasterLu/Getty Images) © The Points Guy Park Guell in Barcelona, Spain. (Photo by MasterLu/Getty Images)

Major air routes: Madrid (MAD) and Barcelona (BCN) are the principal international gateways for travel to Spain.

Here’s a look at air service this summer between the U.S. and Madrid:

  • Air Europa: Miami (MIA — 3x weekly); New York-JFK (3x weekly service begins July 1)
  • Iberia: Boston (BOS — 3x weekly service begins July 2); Chicago-O’Hare (ORD — 4x weekly); Los Angeles (LAX — 3x weekly service begins July 1); Miami (MIA — daily); New York-JFK (daily); San Juan (SJU — 3x weekly service begins July 2)
  • American Airlines: Charlotte (CLT — daily service begins Aug. 17); Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW — daily); Miami (MIA — daily service begins June 17); New York-JFK (daily service begins June 17); Philadelphia (PHL — daily service begins Aug. 17)
  • Delta Air Lines: Atlanta (ATL — 3x weekly service begins Aug. 6); New York-JFK (daily)
  • United Airlines: Newark (EWR — 6x weekly in July, daily from August)

And Barcelona:

  • American Airlines: Miami (MIA — daily); New York-JFK (daily service begins Aug. 17); Philadelphia (PHL — daily service begins Aug. 17)
  • Delta Air Lines: Atlanta (ATL — daily service begins Aug. 5); New York-JFK (3x weekly now, increasing to daily Aug. 5)

United Airlines: Newark (EWR — 5x weekly begins July 8)

COVID-19 test required: Yes, but only fully vaccinated U.S. travelers are allowed in for tourism and are exempt from testing.

• 48 hours before arrival

• PCR or antigen test required

Can children enter the country? Children under age 12 who are unvaccinated can travel to Spain with their parents but need their own QR code from the Spain Travel Health form; children 12 and older must present a vaccination certificate.

Other restrictions: All travelers must fill out a Spain Travel Health form prior to boarding their flight to receive a QR code and present their vaccination certificate; children under age 12 who are unvaccinated can travel to Spain with their parents but need their own QR code; children 12 and older must present a vaccination certificate.

What’s open: Hotels, restaurants and most businesses, with limited capacity.

Spain began welcoming back fully vaccinated American tourists on June 7, 2021. Those who are two weeks or more past (and under one year since) their final dose of Pfizer, Moderna or Astra-Zeneca or their one dose of Johnson & Johnson do not require a test to enter.

Unvaccinated travelers from the U.S. cannot enter for tourism purposes and must be traveling for what Spain calls an “exceptional situation,” receive permission from the Spanish government and provide proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR or antigen test issued within 48 hours of arrival in Spain. Travelers permitted to enter who have recovered from COVID-19 within the past 180 days can also provide a certificate proving their diagnosis.

Details on entry requirements can be found here.

All arrivals in Spain must fill out the Spain Travel Health (SpTH) form at least 48 hours prior to departure to the country. The U.S. is still considered a third-country risk zone, meaning you will need to attach your corresponding documentation (proof of vaccination, recovery or negative test result) to the SpTH form. That will generate a QR code, which you will need to show at border control on arrival.

Related: It’s Official: Spain has reopened to fully vaccinated Americans

The U.S. Embassy in Spain notes that if any documents submitted by U.S. travelers are deemed invalid by Spanish border police, health authorities may require an antigen test taken at the airport or a PCR test after arrival and/or may not allow the passenger entry into Spain.

U.S. State Department advisory: Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Spain.

Featured image by Dreamer4787/Shutterstock.com

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Global Herd Immunity Remains Out Of Reach Because Of Inequitable Vaccine Distribution – 99% Of People In Poor Countries Are Unvaccinated .
Public health experts estimate that approximately 70% of the world’s 7.9 billion people must be fully vaccinated to end the COVID-19 pandemic. As of June 21, 2021, 10.04% of the global population had been fully vaccinated, nearly all of them in rich countries. Only 0.9% of people in low-income countries have received at least one dose. I am a scholar of global health who specializes in health care inequities.

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