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Travel 6 real-life strategies you can use when your flight is canceled or delayed

01:02  07 january  2022
01:02  07 january  2022 Source:   thepointsguy.com

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Between staffing shortages, winter weather and the complications due to the coronavirus pandemic, flight cancellations are an unfortunate reality of traveling right now. On Monday, Jan. 3, more than 2,000 flights to, from and within the U.S. were canceled — and disruptions are likely to continue.

Around the internet and on social media, it’s not hard to find lofty advice on how to make the most out of cancellations and lengthy delays — such as finding fine print loopholes or gaming the system. While the idea of demanding a voucher for the cost of your flight or scoring a swanky stay at a nearby hotel at the airline’s expense sounds great, that’s rarely the reality of what happens when your flight is canceled or delayed.

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Here are the real-life strategies TPG staffers use to deal with flight hiccups.

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Using FlightAware to get ahead

While there is no way to predict which flights will be canceled or delayed, you can sometimes get a heads up before everyone else by monitoring flights on sites like FlightAware.

(Screenshot courtesy FlightAware.com) © The Points Guy (Screenshot courtesy FlightAware.com)

TPG senior reporter Katie Genter uses this strategy to stay ahead of the game and potentially beat out other travelers when rebooking flights. When a flight becomes delayed (or if a flight should be boarding but the aircraft isn’t at the gate and no delays have been announced), she’ll check what FlightAware (or a similar site) shows. You can click “see where my plane is now” to check whether it’s even inbound, yet, which may give a better picture of what timeline to expect for delays.

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Additionally, a flight showing zeroed out (which means the airline has stopped selling tickets) could indicate a cancellation, especially if it’s well in advance of a flight. While not a surefire way to determine when a flight is going to be canceled — airlines stop selling seats for a number of reasons, including a sold-out flight — it is a tool to get more information.

Once you realize a flight is going to be canceled, see if you are able to make a same-day change on the app for a new flight that works. You can also call customer service to double-check that the flight is canceled and see about getting rebooked on the next available flight. Genter notes that elite status call lines are great for this type of assistance, so if you have status with the airline, make sure to utilize that perk.

Being among the first to rebook will give you more options. Once everyone impacted starts calling in and rebooking, seats on upcoming available flights will go quickly.

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Get reimbursed for expenses

Know your rights and take stock of your credit card protections. It will require you to read some fine print, but you may be entitled to accommodations, credits or expense reimbursement by the airline or from your credit card (usually depending on the length of your delay and the reason for delay or cancellation).

Many travel credit cards offer trip delay insurance that can save you money when you’re stuck somewhere. While it won’t help you avoid cancellations or delays, it could help you cover expenses while you wait for your flight.

Using the right credit card to book your flight could save you money in case of delays and cancellations. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images) © The Points Guy Using the right credit card to book your flight could save you money in case of delays and cancellations. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images)

“My JetBlue flight was delayed for more than eight hours, so according to their Customer Bill of Rights, I was entitled to a $200 credit (which actually more than comped what I had originally paid),” said TPG credit card reporter Stella Shon. “Plus, by using trip delay protection on your credit card, you can get reimbursed for any expenses during your day. I bought an airline lounge day pass and a meal, for example.”

How to change or cancel a United Airlines flight

  How to change or cancel a United Airlines flight United Airlines is one of the largest airlines in the U.S., so — especially if you live near one of its hubs — there’s a good chance you’ll find yourself booked on a United Airlines flight at some point in the future. But travel plans can change quickly. So it’s in your best interest to …When United Airlines’ CEO Scott Kirby announced that the airline was eliminating many change fees early in the pandemic, he significantly altered the landscape. To help you cover your bases, this guide will go through all of United’s change and cancellation policies, including when you can get a United Airlines refund.

What you can get will vary by airline, but knowing the fine print will help you make the most of unfortunate hiccups during your travels.

Call customer service (or reach out on Twitter)

It also never hurts to call customer service to see how the airline can help you — especially if you hold elite status with the airline you’re flying. While an agent may not be able to work any miracles to rebook you on a same-day flight to your destination, you can often get a flight credit or some other consolation for the inconvenience.

TPG senior editor Benét Wilson recently had a direct flight from San Antonio, Texas, to Baltimore get canceled on her way to the airport. While she was unable to get a same-day flight out and ended up having to rebook with another airline, a call to Southwest did get her a $300 voucher.

“I called Southwest to make sure they didn’t cancel my Saturday return flight. The agent found a flight but it was SAT to ATL to MYR to BWI, with a late arrival,” Wilson said. “He gave me a $300 LUV voucher for the inconvenience of the canceled flight. I used a travel credit to book the original flight, and the canceled part has already been redeposited to my account.”

Related: Delta doles out SkyMiles for canceled holiday flights; United and others remain silent

It never hurts to call customer service to see how the airline can help. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images) © The Points Guy It never hurts to call customer service to see how the airline can help. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images)

Alternatively, many TPG staffers (including myself) have found success reaching out to an airline on Twitter when customer service lines are busy. The first leg of my American Airlines flight from New York City to Arkansas before Christmas was delayed, causing me to miss my connection. Reaching out to American Airlines on Twitter helped ensure I was rebooked on the earliest possible flight. While that still required me to spend a long layover in Charlotte, North Carolina, it was better (and less stressful) than rushing to the customer service desk to try and rebook upon arrival to Charlotte.

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Strategically book your layovers

Speaking of that long layover in Charlotte, it’s a good example of why I always try to book layovers in cities where I have friends and family. Of course, this isn’t always possible, but some pre-planning (and a willingness to have a slightly longer layover) could save you a headache (and a lot of money) later.

Because I had strategically picked Charlotte (over D.C.) for my layover on my way home, I was able to call a friend who lived in the area to pick me up from the airport when my one-hour layover turned into an almost 9-hour stint in Charlotte due to that original delay. Instead of spending all day in the airport, I was able to spend time with a friend, get some non-airport food and take a nap on her couch.

Show up early for standby flights

If you get a heads up that your flight is canceled or delayed in advance, heading to the airport early could score you a same-day standby flight that gets you to your destination early.

TPG engineering manager Steve Romain was able to avoid an overnight stay by utilizing this strategy. A hiccup with his flight from Austin, Texas, to New York City would have caused him to miss a connection in Dallas. “Since I was A-List, I showed up at the ATX airport a bit earlier and did a free same-day standby onto an earlier flight that connected into a different city, and A-List bumped me to the top of the standby list.”

Note that getting on the standby list isn’t a foolproof method, especially if the earlier flight is almost full. Having elite status (Romain has A-List with Southwest, for example) can certainly help since you’ll have priority over non-elites; plus, some airlines charge a fee for non-elites to be put on the standby list for an earlier flight.

How to change or cancel a JetBlue flight

  How to change or cancel a JetBlue flight If you like booking a flight knowing that you’ll be protected if your plans change, JetBlue is a great option. But, you’ll need to pay attention to the fare class booked. Although JetBlue eliminated its change and cancellation fees back in 2021, the flexible policy doesn’t apply for their lowest-fare class, Blue Basic. But, it …But, it doesn’t usually cost too much more to book the next fare above Blue Basic and you can’t book a Blue Basic award ticket. So, as long as you don’t book a Blue Basic fare, you’ll have some peace of mind with JetBlue if you need to change or cancel a flight.

Related: Delta’s now allowing non-elites to stand by for an earlier flight for free

Fly into a different airport

If you’re really itching to get home, you can also attempt to rebook a flight to another airport before using another method to get home. This is TPG senior travel editor Melanie Lieberman’s top strategy when dealing with flight delays or cancellations that would require her to wait a day or more to get back home.

For example, if your flight from L.A. to New York City is canceled with no same-day rebooking options to fly into NYC, you may check to see if you can get on a flight to Philadelphia (PHL). From there, you can book a train to get the rest of the way back to NYC.

(Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images) © The Points Guy (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

If you don’t live in an area with easy access to train routes or busses, you can also try to do a one-way car rental to get from an alternative airport back home.

This method may not be for everyone — especially if you are able to get booked on a same-day flight or if you don’t mind staying the night in a hotel — but it’s an option for those who need to get home as quickly as possible.

Bottom line: Know your rights

Unfortunately, occasional cancellations and delays are a reality of flying — especially right now. They aren’t always avoidable, but there are ways you can mitigate the fallout.

This certainly isn’t an exhaustive list of everything you can do, but these are the strategies TPG staffers use regularly to pivot when we are faced with pesky cancellations and long flight delays.

At the end of the day, the best thing you can do is know your rights and feel empowered to ask an airline (politely) for help. Whether it’s getting you rebooked on the best possible flight, setting you up with accommodations, giving you a flight credit or adding miles to your loyalty account as a consolation, it never hurts to see what an airline can do for you in the case of a cancellation or delay.

Featured photo by Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images.

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Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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