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Crime Drug cartels using drones to smuggle drugs at border

22:44  03 january  2018
22:44  03 january  2018 Source:   foxnews.com

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Drug cartels are using unmanned drones to carry drugs across the southern border , challenging the U.S. technological ability to stop the advance. Last year, a 25-year-old U.S. citizen was charged with using a drone to smuggle more than 13 pounds of methamphetamine from Mexico.

Thanks for watching❤! SUBSCRIBE to receive more videos for free. Drug cartels using drones to smuggle drugs at border Drug cartels are using unmanned drones

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Border Patrol shows a 2-foot-high drone that a border patrol agent spotted swooping over the border fence on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, near a San Diego border crossing. Authorities have arrested a man they say used the drone to fly drugs across the Mexican border into California. (U.S. Border Patrol via AP) © U.S. Border Patrol This undated photo provided by the U.S. Border Patrol shows a 2-foot-high drone that a border patrol agent spotted swooping over the border fence on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, near a San Diego border crossing. Authorities have arrested a man they say used the drone to fly drugs across the Mexican border into California. (U.S. Border Patrol via AP)

Drug cartels are using unmanned drones to carry drugs across the southern border, challenging the U.S. technological ability to stop the advance.

Brandon Judd, an agent and president of the National Border Patrol Council, warned that the border patrol does not have the technology to contain drones.

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Drug cartels are using unmanned drones to carry drugs across the southern border , challenging the U.S. technological ability to stop the advance. Last year, a 25-year-old U.S. citizen was charged with using a drone to smuggle more than 13 pounds of methamphetamine from Mexico.

Drones are allowing drug smugglers to avoid more traditional routes like cars or underground tunnels. You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

“The number is just astronomical,” Judd told The Washington Times.

At least 13 drones believed to be carrying drugs were spotted in November alone, agents said, according to the Times. The San Diego border area has seen the most activity.

“The moment drones started becoming household items, CBP (U.S. Customs and Border Protection) should have anticipated their use for criminal enterprise,” Judd told the publication. “Instead, and in typical CBP fashion, it waited until an issue became a crisis before it chose to act.”

Defending against drones are inherently challenging and there are no policies in place, which is reportedly a source of frustration for patrol agents.

 “We’re hoping that D.C. gets off the dime or starts getting ahead of the curve instead of being behind the curve, and gives us the tools to keep the country safe,” Christopher J. Harris, an agent and secretary of Local 1613 of the National Border Patrol Council told the Times.

Last year, a 25-year-old U.S. citizen was charged with using a drone to smuggle more than 13 pounds of methamphetamine from Mexico. He reportedly used drones to smuggle drugs five or six times over the period of six months, before he was arrested last year.

Rep. Vicky Hartzler, R-Mo., proposed a bill last year to expand the rules of engagement of border patrol agents with drones. The draft bill, circulated back in November, would authorize federal agencies to track and disrupt drones, in addition to seizing control or firing them down if they deemed a threat to safety.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

New Jersey Legislators Approve Penalties for Drunk Droning .
New Jersey state legislators approved a ban on operating drones while inebriated on Monday, approving legislation that would punish drunk or high pilots with up to six months in prison or a $1,000 fine 39-0 in the State Senate and 65-0 in the State Assembly. The bill is all but set to become law, though when is unclear. Gov. Chris Christie has not commented on whether he approves of the bill; he’s pocket-vetoed prior legislation to regulate law enforcement use of drones, but since this one deals with civilian use, it’s less likely he’d have a problem with it.

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