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Crime Judge won't stop execution of Alabama inmate claiming damaged veins

18:45  21 february  2018
18:45  21 february  2018 Source:   wvtm13.com

Two groups seek clemency for Alabama inmate set to die Thursday

  Two groups seek clemency for Alabama inmate set to die Thursday Two groups seek clemency for Alabama inmate set to die ThursdayThis week, both the International Commission Against the Death Penalty and the United Nations Special Rapporteurs sent letters on Doyle Lee Hamm's behalf.

(AP) — A federal judge ruled Tuesday that an Alabama inmate who has battled lymphoma and hepatitis C has veins that are in good enough shape that the state can execute him by injection this week.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A federal judge ruled Tuesday that an Alabama inmate who has battled lymphoma and hepatitis C has veins that are in good enough shape that the state can execute him by injection this week.

a screen shot of a man: Alabama death row inmate Doyle Hamm © Provided by Hearst Television, Inc. Alabama death row inmate Doyle Hamm A federal judge has ruled that an Alabama inmate's veins are in good enough shape that the state can execute him by lethal injection.

U.S. District Judge Karon O. Bowdre on Tuesday denied Doyle Lee Hamm's request to block his execution this week. Hamm's attorney has argued lymphoma and hepatitis C have damaged his veins to the point that lethal injection would be unconstitutionally painful.

Bowdre said an independent medical review found that Hamm has usable veins in his lower extremities. The expert said ultrasound would be needed to tap the veins in his upper extremities.

Hamm is scheduled to be executed Thursday for the 1987 murder of motel clerk Patrick Cunningham.

Hamm's attorney, Bernard E. Harcourt, said he has asked the judge to reconsider and will appeal the decision.

Supreme Court takes case of death row inmate who forgot the crime .
<p>A month after halting his execution, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to take up the case of an Alabama convicted murderer whose attorneys argue should be spared the death penalty because strokes have wiped out his memory of committing the crime.</p>The justices agreed to decide whether executing 67-year-old Vernon Madison, convicted of fatally shooting a police officer in 1985, would violate the U.S. Constitution's Eighth Amendment bar against cruel and unusual punishment.

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