Crime: Cult guru says NXIVM curriculum was a `destructive program’ - PressFrom - US
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CrimeCult guru says NXIVM curriculum was a `destructive program’

07:50  13 june  2019
07:50  13 june  2019 Source:   nydailynews.com

Lurid testimony wraps up in case against self-help guru

Lurid testimony wraps up in case against self-help guru After weeks of relentlessly lurid testimony, federal prosecutors in New York have wrapped up their case against a former self-improvement guru accused of sex trafficking. 

NXIVM (/ˈnɛksiəm/ NEKS-ee-əm) is an American multi-level marketing company based near Albany, New York that offered personal and professional development seminars through its "Executive

Secrets of NXIVM . Some experts say Keith Raniere, the guru behind an unusual training business Raniere has denied that NXIVM is a cult . Other experts believe there is sufficient evidence for the Through the years, Raniere has shown an interest in hypnotism and neurolinguistic programming , a

Cult guru says NXIVM curriculum was a `destructive program’© Amy Luke/Getty Images

A cult deprogrammer who rescues people from brainwashing sects said the NXIVM group, under fire for alleged sex trafficking, was a “destructive program” that needed to be exposed to the public.

Cult expert Rick Ross, testifying in the federal trial of accused cult leader Keith Raniere, said the Albany-based NXIVM organization came on his radar in 2002, when a couple hired him to intervene after their adult children became entrenched in the group’s way of life.

“It became obvious to me how much power and control the group had,” Ross said.

During that intervention, Ross said, he got his hands on a binder filled with coursework from the group. Ross later published articles written by doctors who analyzed NXIVM’s curriculum.

Nxivm case: Here's what 6 weeks of testimony revealed about the alleged sex cult

Nxivm case: Here's what 6 weeks of testimony revealed about the alleged sex cult Several women testified how they blindly obeyed their "masters," screamed when they were branded and were pressured to have sex with Keith Raniere, the founder of a group called Nxivm. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Raniere ran an Albany, New York-based company offering pricey "self-help" classes to thousands of people across the United States, Canada and Mexico for two decades.

Is NXIVM a cult ? NXIVM – which began, in 1998, as a “ personal and professional development program ” According to the Times Union, NXIVM leaders have consistently denied that the group is a cult . On his website, NXIVM ’s former publicist, Frank Parlato, says DOS is the name of Raniere’s

When I called up cult survivor Steven Hassan, who started the Freedom of Mind Resource Center to help others leave destructive groups, he agreed that the story of NXIVM is still far from over. James was a protege of Richard Bandler, who modeled the practice off Milton Erickson the psychiatrist, who

“It became clear to me that this was a personality-driven group defined by a leader, eerily reminiscent of Scientology and L. Ron Hubbard,” Ross told jurors. “I made those reports public and published them online so anyone could read them.”

A short time after publishing the articles, Ross said, he was sued by NXIVM, a legal battle that went on for 14 years. NXIVM claimed Ross possession of the coursework was a violation of their intellectual property rights.

He said the charges against him were dismissed.

At one point a NXIVM private investigation firm staged a meeting in New York City between Ross and a woman claiming to be the mother of a program participant, Ross said.

He didn’t know it was fake at the time but later learned they set him up.

“What they were selling is that you have to think like, act like and be like Keith Raniere,” Ross said.

Raniere, who is on trial in Brooklyn Federal Court, is accused of helping himself to a group of brainwashed women who were recruited for his sexual pleasure, with some branded with his initials. He has pleaded not guilty, saying his encounters with the alleged victims were consensual.

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