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Crime'Oxygod' sentenced to 17 years in prison after selling counterfeit opioids laced with fentanyl

23:10  27 august  2019
23:10  27 august  2019 Source:   nydailynews.com

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A 22-year-old Santa Ana man was sentenced Monday to more than 17 years in prison for selling fake oxycodone pills laced with fentanyl and other Wyatt Pasek went by the name “ Oxygod ” when looking for customers online, where he would use social media to post photos and videos of himself

26 to more than 17 years in federal prison for selling counterfeit opioid pills laced with fentanyl . (Photo Courtesy of the U.S “The use of powerful drugs such as fentanyl in counterfeit pills intentionally made to look like less-lethal opioids demonstrates a complete disrespect for human life.”

A California man who went by the name “Oxygod” was sentenced to more than 17 years in prison for selling counterfeit opioids laced with Fentanyl on Monday.

'Oxygod' sentenced to 17 years in prison after selling counterfeit opioids laced with fentanyl© Toby Talbot This Feb. 19, 2013 file photo shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Opening statements are scheduled Monday afternoon, Sept. 18, 2017, in a lawsuit by the city of Everett, Wash., against the makers of the prescription opioid OxyContin, in which it claims the pharmaceutical company knew its prescription painkiller was being funneled into the black market, helping create the opioid epidemic.

Orange County resident Wyatt Pasek, 22, was sentenced to 210 months in federal prison for his role in a scheme where pills designed to look like brand-name oxycodone, but were actually made from fentanyl were sold, according to press release from the U.S. Department of Justice.

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4.8. (28). A California man who went by the name “ Oxygod ” was sentenced to more than 17 years in prison for selling counterfeit opioids laced with Fentanyl on Monday. Orange County resident Wyatt Pasek, 22

Wyatt Pasek , 22, was sentenced to 17 years in prison on Aug. 26, 2019, for selling fentanyl laced pills online that were designed to look like oxycodone. Pasek, known by the moniker “ Oxygod ,” ran a drug operation in which he used a secret laboratory on the Balboa Peninsula to make thousands of

“I know I have affected countless [people],” the Santa Ana man said at his sentencing Monday, according to a statement. “I can’t even imagine how much damage I have done.”

Pasek, who had three prior drug-related charges, pleaded guilty in November 2018 to participating in a narcotics-trafficking conspiracy, being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm and money laundering.

A six-month investigation led by the Drug Enforcement Administration prior to Pasek’s arrest in April 2018 found blue pills stamped with “A 215," made to resemble 30 mg. oxycodone pills.

At the time of the arrest of Pasek and two other defendants — Duc Cao, 22, from Orange and Isaiah Suraez, 23, of Newport Beach — officials siezed bags with nearly 100,000 counterfeit pills, hundreds of fake Xanax pills, more than 13 pounds of fentanyl and fentanyl analogues, a pill press and bundles of cash.

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Wyatt Pasek, also known as the " oxygod ," was sentenced in federal court Monday, to 17 and a half years prison for making and selling counterfeit opioid pills laced with fentanyl .

A 22-year-old Instagram influencer known for flaunting his outrageous lifestyle on social media will spend the next 17 years behind bars. Wyatt Pasek, from Orange County in the US, was slapped with the long sentence this week after being accused of selling fake pills laced with fentanyl , reports

The fentanyl and similar drug, cyclopropyl fentanyl, were obtained through Chinese suppliers, according to court documents.

Counterfeit pills were made using a pill press, and distributed through mail, the Department of Justice said in a statement. Sales were conducted hand-to-hand and through a dark web marketplace.

“Had federal agents not intercepted these packages, they would have resulted in substantial counterfeit opioids containing fentanyl and fentanyl analogues to be distributed to New York, California, Massachusetts, Illinois, Texas, Florida, Nevada, Georgia, Utah, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Colorado, Alabama, and Nebraska,” the sentencing memo said.

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Melissa and Daryl McKinsey first heard about "Mexican Oxy" last year when their 19-year-old son Parker called in tears. "I need to go to rehab," he said. Several months earlier, a friend had given Parker a baby-blue pill that was stamped on one side with the letter M. It resembled a well-known brand of oxycodone, the prescription painkiller that sparked the American opioid epidemic. But the pill was actually a far more powerful and more addictive opioid: fentanyl. Within weeks, Parker was crushing and freebasing up to eight pills a day.

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