•   
  •   
  •   

Crime 3 suspected members of Neo-Nazi group 'The Base' arrested, charged

22:41  16 january  2020
22:41  16 january  2020 Source:   wusa9.com

Eargo's next hearing aid promises improved sound in the same tiny size

  Eargo's next hearing aid promises improved sound in the same tiny size Eargo has made a name for itself by doing things differently when it comes to hearing aids. Instead of the usual range of over-the-ear devices, all the company's products are "invisible" (Completely in the Canal -- CIC). That in itself isn't unusual, but the branding, packaging and user experience are all much more akin to consumer "smart" products, than a medical-grade device. Last year's Neo buds were good, but this year's Neo HiFi promises toAs with all hearing products, it'll depend on your personal needs as to whether the Neo HiFi is suitable for you. Eargo states that it's aimed at people with "mild-to-severe, high-frequency hearing loss.

Three alleged members of the racially motivated violent extremist group "The Base" have been charged in a federal complaint with firearms and illegal immigration-related charges, according to a complaint unsealed Thursday by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Maryland.

Federal investigators in the complaint said the organization has been an increasing concern, linking its members to active plans of racially motivated violence.

Dina Lohan arrested for DWI in New York, faces felony

  Dina Lohan arrested for DWI in New York, faces felony Dina Lohan allegedly left the scene of an accident, but cops later arrested her in her home.According to TMZ, Dina Lohan had just left a dinner at Outback Steakhouse in New York when she struck another car outside the restaurant. Dina allegedly fled the scene, but the woman in the other car chased her all the way to Dina's Long Island home, the report says.

Brian Mark Lemley, Jr., 33, of Elkton, Md., and Newark, Del., and William Garfield Bilbrough IV, 19, of Denton, Md., were charged with transporting and harboring aliens and conspiring to do so.

Canadian national Patrik Jordan Mathews, 27, currently of Newark, Del., and Lemley were also charged with transporting a machine gun, disposing of a firearm, and ammunition to an alien unlawfully present in the U.S., officials said.

The group's members discussed, among other things, recruitment, creating a white ethnostate, committing acts of violence against minority communities, including African-Americans and Jewish-Americans, the organization’s military-style training camps, and ways to make improvised-explosive devices in "The Base's" encrypted chat rooms, the federal complaint alleges.

Iran says it has made arrests over plane disaster as protests rage on

  Iran says it has made arrests over plane disaster as protests rage on Iran said on Tuesday it had arrested an undisclosed number of suspects accused of a role in shooting down a Ukrainian airliner, as anti-government demonstrations triggered by the disaster entered a fourth day. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Wednesday's shooting down of Ukraine International Airlines flight 752, killing all 176 people on board, has led to one of the greatest public challenges to Iran's clerical rulers since they came to power in the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

In December 2019, the affidavit alleges that Lemley and Mathews used an upper receiver Lemley ordered, along with other firearms parts, to make a functioning assault rifle. Mathews also allegedly showed the assault rifle to Bilbrough, who examined the assault rifle and returned it to Mathews, according to the affidavit.

Virginia Capital on Edge as F.B.I. Arrests Suspected Neo-Nazis Before Gun Rally

  Virginia Capital on Edge as F.B.I. Arrests Suspected Neo-Nazis Before Gun Rally RICHMOND, Va. — Alarming calls online for a race war. The arrest of three suspected neo-Nazis. Memories of the explosive clashes in Charlottesville, Va., three years ago. A sense of crisis enveloped the capital of Virginia on Thursday, with the police on heightened alert and Richmond bracing for possible violence ahead of a gun rally next week that is expected to draw white supremacists and other anti-government extremists. Members of numerousA sense of crisis enveloped the capital of Virginia on Thursday, with the police on heightened alert and Richmond bracing for possible violence ahead of a gun rally next week that is expected to draw white supremacists and other anti-government extremists.

According to the affidavit, the three men:

  • Tried to make a controlled substance at Lemley and Mathews’s apartment.
  • Talked about "The Base’s" activities and spoke about other members of the organization.
a group of people standing in front of a crowd © Provided by WUSA-TV Washington, D.C.

RELATED: VERIFY: No, the Virginia governor did not propose sending the National Guard to confiscate guns

Lemley and Mathews bought nearly 1,650 rounds of 5.56 mm and 6.5 mm ammunition in January, traveled from Delaware to a gun range in Maryland, where they shot the assault rifle, and retrieved plate carriers (to support body armor) and at least some of the purchased ammunition from Lemley’s previous home in Maryland, according to the affidavit.

Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far

  Heather Heyer's mom: I own guns and think Virginia Democrats are going too far Susan Bro, the mother of Heather Heyer, the Virginia woman killed at a white supremacist rally, doesn't back proposed gun restrictions in Virginia.Susan Bro also has a message for gun rights supporters considering violence at a rally Monday at the Virginia Capitol in Richmond: "We don't need your help.

The complaint alleges that on Aug. 19, Mathews unlawfully crossed from Canada into the U.S. near the Manitoba-Minnesota border and that on Aug. 30, Lemley and Bilbrough allegedly drove from Maryland to Michigan in order to pick up Mathews. All three men returned to Maryland on Aug. 31, the complaint alleges.

The three men drove from Virginia to the Eastern Shore of Maryland on Nov. 3, where Bilbrough lived, the complaint alleges. Lemley and Mathews then continued to the area of Elkton, Md., where Lemley got a motel room for Mathews and the following day, he drove Mathews to Delaware, where Lemley rented an apartment, according to the complaint. The two men have lived there since that time, the complaint alleges.

RELATED: Gun rights activists planning an armed rally as VA Democrats introduce gun control bills

Lemley, according to authorities, previously served as a Cavalry Scout in the U.S. Army, and as of August 2019, Mathews, a Canadian citizen in the U.S. illegally, was a combat engineer in the Canadian Army Reserve.

If convicted, Bilbrough faces 25 years of prison on the federal charges, Lemley faces up to 40 years in prison on various federal charges and Mathews faces up to 20 years -- 10 years of which include charges of being an alien in possession of a firearm and ammunition, according to the affidavit.

Minnesota man exposed as commander of Nazi-led unit dies

  Minnesota man exposed as commander of Nazi-led unit dies MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A retired Minnesota carpenter whom The Associated Press exposed as a former commander of a Nazi-led unit accused of war atrocities has died. Michael Karkoc, whose family maintained that he was never a Nazi or committed any war crimes, lived quietly in Minneapolis for decades until AP's review of U.S. and Ukrainian records in 2013 uncovered his past and prompted investigations in Germany and Poland. Karkoc died Dec. 14, according to cemetery and public records. He was 100. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

The trio faces a federal district court judge Thursday afternoon in Greenbelt, Md.

RELATED: Virginia senator introduces bill proposing firearm safety classes in school

RELATED: Virginia man arrested after loaded gun is found at Philadelphia airport checkpoint

RELATED: Attorney General Mark Herring to reintroduce hate crime bills

Download the brand new WUSA9 app here.

Sign up for the Get Up DC newsletter: Your forecast. Your commute. Your news.

Neo-Nazi group was forming al-Qaida-style terror network, FBI says. 5 things to know .
Police and federal agents around the country are investigating a neo-Nazi group that the FBI says was trying to build an al-Qaida-style terror network. Seven members of The Base were arrested last week on a variety of accusations including plotting violence at a Second Amendment rally in Richmond, Va., on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Seven members of The Base were arrested last week on a variety of accusations including plotting violence at a Second Amendment rally in Richmond, Va., on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Some allegedly planned to kill people involved with Antifa and members of the media in Georgia, according to the FBI.

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!