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Crime Coronavirus updates: Symptomatic hair stylist potentially exposes dozens of people

17:56  23 may  2020
17:56  23 may  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

'Jersey Shore' star DJ Pauly D unrecognizable in 'sophisticated' quarantine beard: 'Doesn't even look like him!'

  'Jersey Shore' star DJ Pauly D unrecognizable in 'sophisticated' quarantine beard: 'Doesn't even look like him!' DJ Pauly D’s got a brand new look for the club. The Jersey Shore star — whose real name is Paul DelVecchio — has grown a beard over the past month. On Monday, when he posted a photo of himself with the facial hair, along with a New York Yankees baseball cap covering his signature style, he looked almost like a different person. With his new look, Pauly D looks a little like castmate Vinny Guadagnino, no? Just last week, the reality star caused a similar stir when he popped up on TikTok without the hair gel he regularly uses. People couldn’t stop complimenting the reality star-turned-Las Vegas staple about his 2020 look.

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 338,000 people worldwide.

a man sitting on a bed: A nurse holds the arm of a patient infected by COVID-19 at the Gilberto Novaes Municipal Field Hospital, on May 21 2020, in Manaus, Brazil. © Andre Coelho/Getty Images A nurse holds the arm of a patient infected by COVID-19 at the Gilberto Novaes Municipal Field Hospital, on May 21 2020, in Manaus, Brazil.

Over 5.2 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

Miley Cyrus' Mom Tish Cuts Her Hair Into a Punk Pixie in Quarantine: Pics

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The United States is the worst-affected country in the world, with more than 1.6 million diagnosed cases and at least 96,007 deaths.

Today's biggest developments:

  • US nears 100,000 deaths
  • Symptomatic hair stylist 'potentially directly exposed' 84 clients
  • Here's how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates.

    10:24 a.m.: Stay-at-home orders sparking some violence, DHS warns

    Stay-at-home orders and social distancing requirements have sparked some violence in the United States, and it could continue under further restrictions, according to a new federal report obtained by ABC News from analysts at the Department of Homeland Security Counterterrorism Mission Center.

    "A variety of illicit actors are responding violently to stay-at-home orders and social distancing measures in place due to COVID-19, and we assess both public and private authority figures and essential workers are at highest risk of being targeted, particularly as the pandemic persists," the DHS reported in the notice issued to law enforcement and federal government leadership Thursday. "Even as parts of the country begin lifting some of these measures, some illicit actors probably will view any continued state-mandated orders as government overreach, and anticipated safety guidelines and policies—specifically the use of face masks—probably also will serve as a driving factor behind continued violent incidents related to the pandemic."

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    a group of people standing in front of a crowd: A person tries to help Angela Rigas as she gets a ticket for being a disorderly person as she cuts hair at the Michigan Conservative Coalition organized © Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images A person tries to help Angela Rigas as she gets a ticket for being a disorderly person as she cuts hair at the Michigan Conservative Coalition organized "Operation Haircut" outside the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, Michigan on May 20, 2020.

    The DHS report was issued the same day President Trump told reporters in Michigan that he would oppose renewed stay-home rules even if a second-wave outbreak occurs this fall, as many public-health experts fear.

    The report does not offer any political or health judgments, but instead bluntly warns about possible future violent acts.

    "Public health officials are warning of a possible second-wave of COVID-19 in late 2020, which would likely result in at least some states re-implementing stay-at-home orders to slow the spread of the virus, according to press reporting. Should this occur, we would expect a repeat of current responses, including additional incidents of hostility against these restrictions, some of which could result in violence targeting law enforcement or other individuals attempting to enforce the stay-at-home orders," according to the report.

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    There has already been at least one incident early this month. Officials said a sheriff's private information was published online by white supremacists who were angry about an arrest.

    A Colorado man was arrested for encouraging people to illegally open-carry firearms at a planned "anti-shutdown protest," according to the report.

    Florida man allegedly kidnapped teen to drive him through coronavirus checkpoint

      Florida man allegedly kidnapped teen to drive him through coronavirus checkpoint A Florida man was arrested last week after allegedly kidnapping a teenager and forcing her to drive him through a coronavirus checkpoint.According to Monroe County Sheriff's Office officials, Alexander Michael Sardinas, 37, of Tavernier, and a 43-year-old woman from Islamorada tried to enter the Florida Keys in a taxi on Thursday morning, but were turned away at the highway checkpoint for not having proper identification. The Florida Keys are closed to non-residents, due to COVID-19 concerns, through the end of May, and proof of residency is required to get through the checkpoint.

    "Upon his arrest, law enforcement officials discovered pipe bombs and additional bomb component materials, according to court documents and press reporting. In response to the arrest, members of an online white supremacist extremist group discussed targeting law enforcement and later doxed the sheriff's home address," the report stated.

    9:43 a.m.: Warden removed from virus hotspot after allegedly not removing sick inmates, BOP union says

    The warden at a federal prison in Louisiana, which became a COVID-19 hotspot, has been removed, according to a Bureau of Prisons union official.

    Rodney Myers was on a temporary assignment as warden at FCC Oakdale. The facility was the first major outbreak in the federal prison system, in which 227 inmates and 40 staff were infected with the virus and eight inmates have died. The complaint also alleges that the numbers the Bureau is releasing are not accurate.

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    This week, the BOP union filed an Occupational Safety and Health Administration complaint about the way Myers handled the COVID-19 outbreak at the federal facility.

    The OSHA complaint alleged that he knowingly and willingly failed to isolate inmates who had tested positive for COVID-19.

    "These inmates have been allowed to continue normal daily activities for at least 4 days through the institution to include working in their inmate jobs…" the report says. "By allowing these inmates to 'roam free' across the institution and in these different areas, these inmates are spreading this known contagion to otherwise clean and sanitized areas and to inmates and staff who may not currently be infected."

    The OSHA complaint also alleged that the warden did not properly conduct a "fit test" for employees' N95 masks. Instead, according to the complaint, the facility gave staff cloth masks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that correctional officers wear N95 masks, gloves and a face shield.

    The Bureau of Prisons has not responded to ABC News' request for comment.

    8:40 a.m.: Most legal challenges to stay-at-home orders seeking religious exemptions denied

    In at least 22 cases, a judge has denied legal challenges seeking religious exemptions to stay-at-home orders that would allow houses of worship to host gatherings, according to research by Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, a religious liberty watchdog group that promotes the separation of church and state.

    Coronavirus: Five new confirmed cases in mainland China

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    The group found six examples where judges granted a religious exemption -- four of them in Kentucky, one in Kansas and one in North Carolina. Two of these cases permitted drive-in services and four allowed in-person services. There are at least ten such cases that remain undecided.

    a person standing in front of a church: Mark Burgess, left, and David Rossini with Bostonian Cleaning and Restoration of Braintree cleans the aisle at St. Gregory's Church in Boston's Dorchester during the COVID-19 pandemic on May 18, 2020. © David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images Mark Burgess, left, and David Rossini with Bostonian Cleaning and Restoration of Braintree cleans the aisle at St. Gregory's Church in Boston's Dorchester during the COVID-19 pandemic on May 18, 2020.

    The data was provided in the wake of President Donald Trump deeming houses of worship "essential." Trump demanded on Friday governors allow them to reopen "this weekend," threatening to "override" the governors if they didn't. He did not explain what legal grounds he had to do so.

    Rachel Laser, president and CEO of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, said the demand was "irresponsible and reckless -- and tragically, will lead to more deaths."

    "Decisions about how, when and if houses of worship can offer in-person services must be left to state and local public health officials who are familiar with the unique situations they face," Laser said in a statement. "President Trump has no power to override the nation's governors in this area."

    a group of people performing on a counter: Worshipers wearing masks and practicing social distancing are seeing during service at Hopeful Baptist Church on Sunday, May 17, 2020, in Montpelier, VA. © Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images Worshipers wearing masks and practicing social distancing are seeing during service at Hopeful Baptist Church on Sunday, May 17, 2020, in Montpelier, VA.

    7:18 a.m.: Hertz files for bankruptcy

    Car rental company Hertz filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Friday amid the global economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Coronavirus: Brazil becomes the second most affected country after the US

     Coronavirus: Brazil becomes the second most affected country after the US HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-BRAZIL: Coronavirus: Brazil becomes the second most affected country after the US © Reuters / AMANDA PEROBELLI CORONAVIRUS: BRAZIL BECOMES THE SECOND MOST ACHIEVED COUNTRY AFTER US PARIS (Reuters) - Brazil's health minister confirmed on Friday that 330,890 people are infected with coronavirus, making it the second most affected country after the United States. Friday, Brazil recorded 1,001 deaths, bringing the total toll of the epidemic to 21,048 deaths in the country.

    The company cited the "sudden and dramatic" decline in demand and future bookings as millions across the U.S. stayed at home to help stop slow the spread of the coronavirus.

    Hertz said all of its stores, along with its subsidiaries like Dollar, Thrifty, will remain open after the filing. All reservations, promotions, vouchers, etc. are expected to continue as usual, the company said.

    "With the severity of the COVID-19 impact on our business, and the uncertainty of when travel and the economy will rebound, we need to take further steps to weather a potentially prolonged recovery," Hertz President and CEO Paul Stone said in a statement Friday. "Today's action will protect the value of our business, allow us to continue our operations and serve our customers, and provide the time to put in place a new, stronger financial foundation to move successfully through this pandemic and to better position us for the future."

    Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

    While travel is nowhere near normal levels, there is slight momentum towards a rebound as many states begin reopening. TSA screened 318,449 people on Thursday, the highest number of passengers since March 23. Compared to the same day last year, it is still down around 88% when the agency screened 2,673,635 people.

    5 a.m.: Missouri hair stylist 'potentially directly exposed' 84 clients to COVID-19

    A symptomatic hair stylist in Springfield, Missouri, may have exposed 84 clients and seven coworkers to the novel coronavirus over the course of eight days this month.

    The hair stylist had recently traveled within the Show-Me and, after returning to Springfield, gave haircuts at a Great Clips from May 12-20, according to the Springfield-Greene County Health Department.

    "This scenario is well within our capacity for staff to contact trace and hopefully contain," Clay Goddard, director of health for Springfield-Greene County, said at a news conference Friday. "But I'm going to be honest with you, we can't have many more of these. We can't make this a regular habit or our capability as a community will be strained and we will have to reevaluate what things look like going forward."

    All potentially exposed individuals will be notified and offered testing, Goddard said. Officials are hoping for a minimal spread of COVID-19 from this incident because all parties concerned were wearing masks.

    He said as the state and local communities reopen, it's important for citizens to realize the social responsibility they have to others. Don't assume your slight cold or allergies are just that; make sure to get tested, Goddard said.

    If people don't do this, it will put a strain on the local health care system and could force officials to rethink their economic reopening plans.

    "We are moving out of a phase where we took enormous sacrifice as a community. There are economic hardships as a result of that," Goddard said Friday. "We're in a new phase of this disease where we're going to walk that tight rope between disease control and economic harm. If we are going to work sick and sharing this illness with others, that's not a good approach."

    Missouri Gov. Mike Parson lifted many of the state's restrictions and its stay-at-home order on May 4.

    The state has more than 11,844 diagnosed cases of COVID-19, with at least 677 deaths.

    What to know about coronavirus:

    • How it started and how to protect yourself: Coronavirus explained
    • What to do if you have symptoms: Coronavirus symptoms
    • Tracking the spread in the U.S. and worldwide: Coronavirus map
    a person standing in a room: A nurse holds the arm of a patient infected by COVID-19 at the Gilberto Novaes Municipal Field Hospital, on May 21 2020, in Manaus, Brazil. © Andre Coelho/Getty Images A nurse holds the arm of a patient infected by COVID-19 at the Gilberto Novaes Municipal Field Hospital, on May 21 2020, in Manaus, Brazil.

    ABC News' Mina Kaji, Liz Alesse, Luke Barr and Josh Margolin contributed to this report.

    Coronavirus: Brazil becomes the second most affected country after the US .
    HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-BRAZIL: Coronavirus: Brazil becomes the second most affected country after the US © Reuters / AMANDA PEROBELLI CORONAVIRUS: BRAZIL BECOMES THE SECOND MOST ACHIEVED COUNTRY AFTER US PARIS (Reuters) - Brazil's health minister confirmed on Friday that 330,890 people are infected with coronavirus, making it the second most affected country after the United States. Friday, Brazil recorded 1,001 deaths, bringing the total toll of the epidemic to 21,048 deaths in the country.

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