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Crime Rep. Attica Scott, Author of Breonna's Law, Arrested in Louisville During Protests

11:21  25 september  2020
11:21  25 september  2020 Source:   newsweek.com

Louisville braces for fallout ahead of decision on charging police in Breonna Taylor case

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Police in Louisville , Kentucky, arrested a state lawmaker, Rep . Attica Scott , who had introduced legislation to ban "no-knock" warrants following the police killing of Breonna Taylor. Scott was arrested near the First Unitarian Church in downtown Louisville , where protesters were seeking

Attica Scott , the state lawmaker who co- authored Breonna ’ s Law , a police reform bill that bans no-knock search warrants similar to the one police executed when Taylor was shot March 13, Ryan Van Velzer, a reporter for WFPL News in Louisville , said on Twitter. Police also arrested protesters

Kentucky state Representative Attica Scott was arrested Thursday during protests in Louisville over the indictments in the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor.

a group of people performing on stage in front of a crowd: Protesters filled the streets of downtown Louisville, Kentucky on Thursday after indictments in the Breonna Taylor case returned no charges for Taylor's death. © Michael M. Santiago/Getty Protesters filled the streets of downtown Louisville, Kentucky on Thursday after indictments in the Breonna Taylor case returned no charges for Taylor's death.

Scott was arrested at First Unitarian Church in downtown Louisville. Although the city had been placed under a curfew which began at 9:00 p.m. EDT, churches were exempt from the deadline. Some protesters, including Scott, were arrested while trying to enter the church.

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Kentucky lawmaker who proposed ' Breonna ' s law ' to stop 'no-knock' warrants is arrested for rioting as Louisville Attica Scott , a Democrat, was charged with felony rioting, failure to disperse and unlawful assembly. Protests over the killing of Breonna Taylor continued Thursday in the city of Louisville .

Louisville police officers shot during breonna taylor protests ; suspect in Andy Beshear said in a video message late Wednesday that one individual shot two law Protests broke out in Louisville after a Jefferson County grand jury decided Wednesday to indict one officer

In a tweet, State Representative Josie Raymond called for the release of Scott and community organizer Shameka Parrish Wright.

"If you arrest the loudest voices fighting racial injustice in Louisville," Raymond wrote, "we have to believe you want to silence the fight against racial injustice. Let @atticascott4ky and @Seasoned4u out and get out of their way."

Newsweek reached out to the Louisville Metropolitan Police Department for comment.

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Breonna ' s Law for Kentucky addressing implicit bias in maternal health teaching Black & Indigenous people's history stopping Protests in Louisville over Breonna Taylor's murder have been going on for 100 days. Read Rep . Attica Scott 's moving description of those seeking justice.

Fresh protests were expected in Louisville and elsewhere in America on Thursday as public anger and sadness continued to ripple out from the Kentucky city in the wake of the announcement that no police officers would be charged directly with the shooting death of Breonna Taylor in March.

Scott is the author of Breonna's Law, a piece of legislation that called for a ban of no-knock warrants in Louisville. Breonna's Law was approved by the Louisville City Council in June. Louisville Mayor Greg Fisher signed the ordinance soon afterward. Scott pre-filed a version of Breonna's Law in August with the state in an effort to ban no-knock warrants across Kentucky.

Members of the Louisville Metropolitan Police Department were allegedly serving a no-knock warrant at Taylor's apartment in March. Under a no-knock warrant, police do not have to identify themselves before entering a residence. Believing the officers to burglars, Taylor's partner Kenneth Walker opened fire. During the ensuing gunfight, Taylor was hit at least five times while asleep in her bed.

No body camera footage of Taylor's shooting exists. According to remarks from Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron during a Wednesday press conference, the officers were "advised by superiors" to knock and identify themselves while serving the warrant. "In other words," Cameron said, "the warrant was not served as a no-knock warrant."

Ballistics tests between two separate laboratories were inconclusive as to which officer fired the shot that killed Taylor. Former officer Brett Hankison was indicted on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for firing his weapon into surrounding apartments. Louisville police officers Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Miles Cosgrove, who also discharged their firearms during the incident, were not charged.

The findings of the grand jury caused protests to break out in Louisville. On Wednesday, Scott tweeted that Attorney General Cameron "did not deliver justice today and neither did the grand jury. You deserve better. We will pass Breonna's Law for Kentucky. You will never be forgotten."

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Breonna Taylor neighbor wants to know why cop wasn't charged for shooting into his unit .
"If that bullet went through my bed maybe I would have been dead too," Breonna Taylor's neighbor Stanley David said.One punched through the hallway. The other passed right in front of his bedroom door, roughly 5 feet from where he was sleeping.

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