•   
  •   
  •   

Crime Kentucky AG asks to keep evidence sealed in Breonna Taylor case

02:40  18 october  2020
02:40  18 october  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

If you think Breonna Taylor's family got too much, how much is your daughter worth?

  If you think Breonna Taylor's family got too much, how much is your daughter worth? As soon as the settlement was announced, people on social media came out of the woodwork to attack Breonna Taylor's mother.It didn't take long after Mayor Greg Fischer announced Louisville has agreed to pay the family of Breonna Taylor $12 million to settle the family's lawsuit against the city for the attacks to start.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron Tuesday night suggested the grand jury in the Breonna Taylor case could have made an "assessment about different charges," in an exclusive on-camera interview with CNN affiliate WDRB.

Andy Beshear called upon the Kentucky attorney general Daniel Cameron to release all "information, evidence , and facts" without affecting the three felony counts in the Breonna Taylor case . The governor went on to say that the public deserves the information and everyone should be informed.

Kentucky's attorney general and the attorney for former Louisville Metro Police Department officer Brett Hankison combined forces in a joint motion earlier this week asking a judge to revoke a previous order to release evidence in the Breonna Taylor case to the public.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks during a press conference to announce a grand jury's decision to indict one of three Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor on Sept. 23, 2020, in Frankfort, Ky. © Jon Cherry/Getty Images Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks during a press conference to announce a grand jury's decision to indict one of three Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor on Sept. 23, 2020, in Frankfort, Ky.

Attorney General Daniel Cameron and Hankison's attorney, William Stewart Mathews, said they planned to present the motion in court Monday in an effort to get Circuit Judge Ann Bailey Smith to either revoke her order to release evidence in the case, or seal it until the ex-officer's trial.

'Get your damn story straight': What we know about Louisville woman Breonna Taylor's death

  'Get your damn story straight': What we know about Louisville woman Breonna Taylor's death Here's what to know about the police search that left Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old Louisville woman, dead in her home.LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Criticism of Louisville police is mounting as national attention turns to the March shooting death of Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency room technician who was killed by  officers in her own home.

Kentucky AG denies cops executed ‘no-knock warrant’ in Breonna Taylor case . The Louisville police officers involved in Breonna Taylor ’s shooting death “knocked and announced” themselves “ Evidence showed officers knocked and announced their presence at the apartment,” Cameron said

Kentucky 's attorney general will serve as a special prosecutor in the killing of Breonna Taylor , a "The Office of the Attorney General has been asked to serve as special prosecutor in the matter The family's suit said that Walker had a license to carry and kept firearms in the home, and that Taylor I urgently request that you ensure that justice is done in this case ," Booker wrote in his letter to Cameron.

In the previous ruling, Smith ordered the AG to redact any personal information as a safety precaution, but Cameron and Mathews argued that the evidence could still endanger those involved if made public.

They also argued the releasing files might "permanently taint potential jurors" in Hankison's trial and claimed that people involved in the case had received death threats.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks during a press conference to announce a grand jury's decision to indict one of three Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor on Sept. 23, 2020, in Frankfort, Ky. © Jon Cherry/Getty Images Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks during a press conference to announce a grand jury's decision to indict one of three Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor on Sept. 23, 2020, in Frankfort, Ky.

"The parties submit that filing discovery in the record would allow said materials, many of which may never be admitted as evidence in court, to be published by the media, and permanently taint potential jurors for trial of this matter," the motion said. "Redaction of personal identifiers does not remedy the problem."

'Protect Breonna, protect myself': Taylor's boyfriend recounts night she was killed

  'Protect Breonna, protect myself': Taylor's boyfriend recounts night she was killed Breonna Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, recounts the night Taylor was shot dead in her Louisville home. In an interview with ABC News and Louisville's Courier Journal Wednesday, Walker recounted the night he witnessed 26-year-old Taylor get shot dead by police in her Louisville home.

Andy Beshear called upon the Kentucky attorney general Daniel Cameron to release all "information, evidence , and facts" without affecting the three felony counts in the Breonna Taylor case . The governor went on to say that the public deserves the information and everyone should be

When asked if he understands the anger people feel over the Breonna Taylor case Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron saide her does and Trump claims immunity, negative test without providing evidence . Fauci says he did not consent to appearing in Trump ad. 1 dead after shooting at

Separately, the attorneys cited "unprecedented" media coverage and the "anticipated wholesale posting of the entire discovery in this matter on the internet" as reasons to keep the evidence private.

"The parties in this matter have received threats of violence in regard to this case. Publishing the Discovery could only serve as an impetus for more of the same," the documents said. "The parties agree that the administration of justice can best be served by limiting materials published in the record to the evidence actually admitted in court."

MORE: Kentucky judge mulls grand juror's request to speak publicly in Breonna Taylor case

Taylor, 26, was shot and killed by Louisville police officers after they executed a "no-knock" warrant while investigating a suspected drug operation linked to her ex-boyfriend.

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were in bed sleeping on the night of March 13 when they heard a commotion outside; after a short exchange with police, Walker says he fired his gun in self-defense, saying he thought the home was being broken into, according to police.

Breonna Taylor's mom hopes settlement serves as national model for police reform

  Breonna Taylor's mom hopes settlement serves as national model for police reform The mother of Breonna Taylor and the mayor of Louisville, Kentucky, announced the $12 million settlement of a lawsuit involving Taylor's death at the hands of police. "I wear this shirt just to remind people that every day I'm fighting for her," Palmer told ABC News. "It doesn't matter if my day is full of me running errands; when I'm out and about, people see me so they need to see her name.

AG Cameron has said little about the case since taking it over in May. Kentucky officials offered new details on Friday in the investigation into the death of Breonna Taylor , a young Black medical worker who was fatally shot in Louisville, Ky., by plainclothes police officers who had entered her home.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has refused to release grand jury transcripts related to the Breonna Taylor case despite growing public calls to do so by the Louisville mayor, the Kentucky governor, and Taylor 's family's attorneys.

a street sign with trees in the background: In an aerial view from a drone, a large-scale ground mural depicting Breonna Taylor with the text 'Black Lives Matter' is seen being painted at Chambers Park on July 5, 2020, in Annapolis, Md. © Patrick Smith/Getty Images, FILE In an aerial view from a drone, a large-scale ground mural depicting Breonna Taylor with the text 'Black Lives Matter' is seen being painted at Chambers Park on July 5, 2020, in Annapolis, Md.

The plainclothes officers returned gunfire, firing several shots and fatally hitting Taylor, police said.

Kevin Glogower, who is now representing two anonymous grand jurors in the case, had previously asked the judge to release discovery information and to allow jurors to speak publicly, despite long-standing practices against doing so.

He said he filed the motion over concerns about public trust and transparency, and accused Cameron of using the jurors as a shield to deflect accountability. Cameron's office denied those claims and said it was "confident" that it had presented a thorough case.

MORE: Lawyer for juror in Breonna Taylor case fires back at Kentucky AG

Taylor's family also advocated for evidence to be released in the case and complained about the officers not being charged for the young woman's death specifically. Hankison is facing three counts of wanton endangerment, but neither he nor the two other officers involved in the shooting were charged in connection with Taylor's death.

The charges against Hankison, who fired 10 shots into Taylor's apartment, stem from the errant bullets that penetrated a wall of the residence and entered a neighboring apartment occupied by a child, a man and a pregnant woman, Cameron said at a news conference following the grand jury's announcement.

Breonna Taylor case: Dispute arises over grand jury secrecy .
LOUISVILLE, Ky (AP) — A lawyer for a grand juror involved in weighing charges in the case of Breonna Taylor, the Black woman killed in a police raid gone wrong, urged a judge to let the anonymous juror to speak out publicly, accusing Kentucky's attorney general of throwing the panel “under the bus" in his public comments. Kevin Glogower, the lawyer for the anonymous grand juror who sued to speak out publicly, told Jefferson County Circuit Judge Annie O'Connell on Thursday that the goal was not to publicize evidence that hasn't become public or “to be part of a global discussion in race relations.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 9
This is interesting!