•   
  •   
  •   

Crime EMT Who Witnessed George Floyd's Killing Says Cops Waved Her Off When She Tried to Help Him

17:50  31 march  2021
17:50  31 march  2021 Source:   people.com

Opinion: One of the most important trials America has ever seen is about to start

  Opinion: One of the most important trials America has ever seen is about to start Elie Honig writes that while there is no way to predict what the jury in the Derek Chauvin trial will decide, this uncertainty is even more pronounced in a case involving the police and race.We have a jury in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, charged with the May 2020 killing of George Floyd. Now we stand on the precipice of one of the most important trials this country has ever seen.

An off-duty firefighter and EMT on her day off was alarmed last May as she happened upon the scene where Minneapolis police had detained George Floyd, but the officers denied her the chance to help what she believed was a dying man, she said.

a person wearing a suit and tie sitting at a table: AP/Shutterstock Derek Chauvin, at right, listens as motions are heard March 29 during his trial for killing George Floyd. © Provided by People AP/Shutterstock Derek Chauvin, at right, listens as motions are heard March 29 during his trial for killing George Floyd.

"I was desperate to help," Genevieve Hansen, 27, testified Tuesday in the trial of a former officer, Derek Chauvin, accused of Floyd's murder. "I would have been able to provide medical attention to the best of my abilities, and this human was denied that right."

Derek Chauvin Told Witness Who Confronted Him After Killing, 'That's Just One Person's Opinion'

  Derek Chauvin Told Witness Who Confronted Him After Killing, 'That's Just One Person's Opinion' Derek Chauvin, who has pleaded not guilty to the murder of George Floyd, told a bystander, "We gotta put force, gotta control this guy because he's a sizable guy""You can't win," McMillian, 61, could be heard saying on video played Wednesday in the trial of a former officer, Derek Chauvin, charged with Floyd's murder.

When she repeatedly urged the officers to let her attend to Floyd, she testified, they told her to stay back as Floyd, with his hands in cuffs, lay facedown on the pavement as Chauvin sat atop him with his knee pressed into Floyd's neck.

RELATED: Dispatcher Who Watched George Floyd's Death in Real Time 'Called Police on the Police': Prosecutor

The situation made her feel helpless, Hansen told jurors, because she felt "there is a man being killed" as she watched.

She testified that she pleaded with officers to check for Floyd's pulse. "I had already assessed that he had an altered level of consciousness," she said. "What I needed to know is whether he had a pulse anymore."

RELATED: Disturbing Video of George Floyd's Death Takes Center Stage as Murder Trial of Ex-Officer Begins

Witnesses to George Floyd's death express frustration over not being able to save him

  Witnesses to George Floyd's death express frustration over not being able to save him They cursed at the cops and made videos, but witnesses say they were helpless to save George Floyd. On the warm spring evening of May 25, 2020, they and others converged just after 8 p.m. outside the Cup Foods store on the corner of Chicago Avenue and East 38th Street in south Minneapolis, witnessing what prosecutors have described as the torturous murder of George Floyd at the hands of police officers.

Like other bystanders, Hansen began to film the scene, adding to the video record that chronicled the death of Floyd, a Black man, as the white police officer remained in place atop Floyd for nearly nine minutes, while Floyd repeatedly cried out "I can't breathe."

a man wearing a suit and tie: AP/Shutterstock Genevieve Hansen © Provided by People AP/Shutterstock Genevieve Hansen

Chauvin has pleaded not guilty to charges of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Witnesses to Floyd's killing who spoke Tuesday on the emotional second day of testimony in Chauvin's trial also included Darnella Frazier, 18, whose video went viral and fueled the worldwide response that sent millions into the streets to protest police brutality and racial injustice in the wake of Floyd's death.

a man standing in front of a brick wall posing for the camera: George Floyd © Provided by People George Floyd

Age 17 at the time of the incident May 25, Frazier described the trauma that has since followed her, causing her at times to lie awake at night "apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more and not physically interacting and not saving his life."

Key takeaways from 1st week of Derek Chauvin trial

  Key takeaways from 1st week of Derek Chauvin trial Here are some key takeaways five days into Derek Chauvin's trial. The high-profile trial is expected to last another three weeks, as Chauvin faces charges of manslaughter, second-degree murder and third-degree murder. Even President Joe Biden is "watching closely," according to White House press secretary Jen Psaki.

"I heard George Floyd say, 'I can't breathe, please get off of me. I can't breathe,'" Frazier testified. "He cried for his mom. He was in pain, and it was like he knew it was over for him."

Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Sign up for PEOPLE's free True Crime newsletter for breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases.

She told the court: "When I look at George Floyd, I look at my dad. I look at my brothers. I look at my cousins, my uncles because they are all Black. I have a Black father. I have a Black brother. I have Black friends. And I look at that, and I look at how that could have been one of them."

a person wearing a suit and tie sitting at a table: Derek Chauvin, at right, listens as motions are heard March 29 during his trial for killing George Floyd. © AP/Shutterstock Derek Chauvin, at right, listens as motions are heard March 29 during his trial for killing George Floyd.

RELATED: George Floyd Family Settles $27 Million Civil Suit with City of Minneapolis

Floyd, 46, had been detained for allegedly spending a counterfeit $20 bill at a convenience store. Chauvin, 44, responded and treated Floyd using proper police methods, according to his defense attorney Eric Nelson, who suggested in his opening statement that Floyd's death resulted, in part, from Floyd's underlying health conditions and drug use rather than the pressure applied by Chauvin to Floyd's neck.

Police chief: Fired cop broke policy in pinning Floyd

  Police chief: Fired cop broke policy in pinning Floyd MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minneapolis police chief who called George Floyd's death “murder” soon after it happened testified that Officer Derek Chauvin had clearly violated department policy when he pinned Floyd's neck beneath his knee for more than 9 minutes. Continuing to kneel on Floyd's neck once he was handcuffed behind his back and lying on his stomach was “in no way, shape or form” part of department policy or training, "and it is certainlyContinuing to kneel on Floyd's neck once he was handcuffed behind his back and lying on his stomach was “in no way, shape or form” part of department policy or training, "and it is certainly not part of our ethics or our values,” Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said Monday on D

Both the Hennepin County medical examiner and a private pathologist hired by the Floyd family concluded that Floyd died by homicide.

Three other officers on the scene — J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao — all were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. They will be tried apart from Chauvin this summer. Each has pleaded not guilty.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Getty A memorial at the Minneapolis site where George Floyd was killed © Provided by People Getty A memorial at the Minneapolis site where George Floyd was killed

All four officers were fired after the killing. In the midst of jury selection that began March 8, the City of Minneapolis announced a $27 million settlement with Floyd's family in a civil lawsuit brought against the city, Chauvin and the three other former officers.

Nelson challenged the EMT on the stand, asking whether she would have been able to effectively perform her job amid what Nelson portrayed as a growing crowd of bystanders shouting and yelling at officers. She answered that she would not have been distracted and "would be confident in doing her job."

Nelson asked Hansen why she directed profanity at the officers and whether other witnesses were angry.

"I don't know if you've seen anyone be killed," she replied, "but it's upsetting."

Testimony resumes Wednesday.

Expert: Lack of oxygen killed George Floyd, not drugs .
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — George Floyd died of a lack of oxygen from the way he was held down by police, a retired forensic pathologist testified Friday at former Officer Derek Chauvin's murder trial. The testimony of Lindsey Thomas, who retired in 2017 from the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's office in Minneapolis, bolstered the findings of other experts on Thursday who rejected the defense theory that Floyd’s drug use and underlying health problems killed him.

usr: 3
This is interesting!