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Crime Jury's swift verdict for Chauvin in Floyd death: Guilty

07:40  21 april  2021
07:40  21 april  2021 Source:   msn.com

Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death

  Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged in George Floyd 's death enters its third week Monday, with the state nearing the end of a case built on searing witness accounts, official rejections of the neck restraint and expert testimony attributing Floyd's death to a lack of oxygen. Derek Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s May 25 death. Police were called to a neighborhood market where Floyd, who was Black, was accused of trying to pass a counterfeit bill.

The jury found him guilty on all three counts on Tuesday afternoon. Following the verdict , Chauvin ’ s bail was revoked and he was ordered back to jail. He was immediately taken into custody by Hennepin County sheriff’ s deputies and led out of the courtroom in handcuffs. Prosecutors argued Chauvin kept his knee on Floyd ’ s neck for several minutes, which led to him asphyxiating. Chauvin ’ s defense argued that Floyd had a fatal dose of the drug fentanyl in his system and that the autopsy found no signs of choking damage.

A jury on Tuesday found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all three charges, including second-degree murder, stemming from the killing of George Floyd , an unarmed Black man, last year. Jurors reached the verdict on their second day of deliberations. Video of Chauvin holding his knee on or near Floyd ' s neck for more than nine minutes last May, while Floyd was prone and handcuffed, spurred months of protests and reanimated the movement opposing police brutality against Black men.

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — After three weeks of testimony, the trial of the former police officer charged with killing George Floyd ended swiftly: barely more than a day of jury deliberations, then just minutes for the verdicts to be read — guilty, guilty and guilty — and Derek Chauvin was handcuffed and taken away to prison.

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, center, is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, left, looks on, after the verdicts were read at Chauvin's trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV via AP, Pool) © Provided by Associated Press In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, center, is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, left, looks on, after the verdicts were read at Chauvin's trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

Chauvin, 45, could be sent to prison for decades when he is sentenced in about two months a case that triggered worldwide protests, violence and a furious reexamination of racism and policing in the U.S.

EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs

  EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The judge overseeing the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer in the death of George Floyd said Monday that he'll leave it up to the jury to sort out whether Floyd yelled “I ate too many drugs” or “I ain’t do no drugs” as three officers pinned him to the ground. Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill made the ruling as attorneys argued over whether to allow the testimony of a use-of-force expert for the prosecution, Seth Stoughton, a professor at the University of South Carolina Law School. Prosecutors wanted him to testify from an academic perspective on whether Chauvin used reasonable force and about national policing standards.

MINNEAPOLIS — The jury has found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd last May. Chauvin , 45, was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. He also called on Americans to turn the guilty verdict of Derek Chauvin into a "moment of significant change" to fight systemic racism in policing. Biden urged the Senate' s passage of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act – named in Floyd ' s honor – that seeks to bolster police accountability and prevent problem officers from moving from one department to another.

The jury swiftly and unanimously convicted Chauvin of all the charges he faced – second- and third-degree murder, and manslaughter – after concluding that the white former Minneapolis police officer killed the 46-year-old Black man in May through a criminal assault, by pinning him to the ground so he At George Floyd Square, the makeshift memorial that has grown up in the street where Chauvin killed him, Mileesha Smith welcomed the verdicts . People inside the Twees Foods Store in the Third Ward where George Floyd grew up watch the verdict in Derek Chauvin ’ s trial in Houston, Texas.

The verdict set off jubilation mixed with sorrow across the city and around the nation. Hundreds of people poured into the streets of Minneapolis, some running through traffic with banners. Drivers blared their horns in celebration.

“Today, we are able to breathe again,” Floyd's younger brother Philonise said at a joyous family news conference where tears streamed down his face as he likened Floyd to the 1955 Mississippi lynching victim Emmett Till, except that this time there were cameras around to show the world what happened.

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listens as the verdict is read in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool) © Provided by Associated Press In this image from video, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listens as the verdict is read in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

The jury of six whites and six Black or multiracial people came back with its verdict after about 10 hours of deliberations over two days. The now-fired white officer was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill.

  The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill. While Judge Peter Cahill allowed cameras in the courtroom for the first time in Minnesota state history, he's also been strict on other matters.That is exactly where Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill finds himself in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, entering its sixth week and bringing daily controversy and scrutiny to every step taken in the courtroom.

The jury in the murder trial of ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd has reached a verdict , officials said Tuesday. The 12-member panel is due to announce its decision shortly after the court reconvenes. Jurors deliberated for more than 10 hours over two days The four-member prosecution team, led by Assistant State Attorney General Matthew Frank, focused repeatedly on viral video footage of Floyd ’ s death , which included Chauvin pressing his knee on the man’ s neck for 9 minutes and 29 seconds. Enlarge Image. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek

The jury reached a verdict in Derek Chauvin ' s murder trial on Tuesday, one day after closing arguments. The verdict is set to be read between 4:30 and 5 p.m. ET. Chauvin was charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in the During the three-week trial, the jury heard emotional testimony and watched numerous videos of the arrest. Chauvin did not testify, invoking his Fifth Amendment rights. The other three police officers involved in Floyd ' s arrest - Thomas Lane, Tou Thao, and J. Alexander Kueng - face their own trial in

Chauvin's face was obscured by a COVID-19 mask, and little reaction could be seen beyond his eyes darting around the courtroom. His bail was immediately revoked. Sentencing will be in two months; the most serious charge carries up to 40 years in prison.

Defense attorney Eric Nelson followed Chauvin out of the courtroom without comment.

President Joe Biden welcomed the verdict, saying Floyd’s death was “a murder in full light of day, and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world” to see systemic racism.

But he warned: “It’s not enough. We can’t stop here. We’re going to deliver real change and reform. We can and we must do more to reduce the likelihood that tragedies like this will ever happen again.”

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody as his attorney Eric Nelson, left, watches, after his bail was revoked after he was found guilty on all three counts in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool) © Provided by Associated Press In this image from video, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody as his attorney Eric Nelson, left, watches, after his bail was revoked after he was found guilty on all three counts in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

The jury's decision was hailed around the country as justice by other political and civic leaders and celebrities, including former President Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey and California Gov. Gavin Newsom, a white man, who said on Twitter that Floyd “would still be alive if he looked like me. That must change.”

EXPLAINER: Why is 'excited delirium' cited at Chauvin trial?

  EXPLAINER: Why is 'excited delirium' cited at Chauvin trial? MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The attorney for the former Minneapolis police officer on trial in George Floyd ’s death revisited the disputed concept of excited delirium Tuesday in an effort to show that the force Derek Chauvin used was objectively reasonable given Floyd's resistance. Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter. Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was arrested outside a neighborhood market on May 25, accused of trying to pass a counterfeit $20 bill. A panicky-sounding Floyd struggled and claimed to be claustrophobic as police tried to put him in a squad car.

The jury in the trial of Derek Chauvin found the former Minneapolis police officer guilty of murder and manslaughter charges in the death of George Floyd . "Are these your verdicts ? So say you one, so say you all?" Judge Peter Cahill asked the jury after its verdict was announced. Chauvin was accused of killing Floyd , an unarmed Black man, by kneeling on his neck for about nine minutes. The white former officer' s conduct last May, which was captured on video, set off a nationwide firestorm of protests and unrest against police brutality and racism. The anonymous group of jurors began deliberating

The jury in the trial of Derek Chauvin , the ex-Minneapolis policeman accused of killing George Floyd last year, has retired to consider its verdict . The prosecution told jurors that Mr Chauvin had murdered Mr Floyd , but the defence said their client had correctly followed police training. The court is being protected by barbed wire, high barriers and armed soldiers from the National Guard. Cities across the country are bracing for protests regardless of the verdict . On Monday, the prosecution and defence made their closing statements in a trial that lasted three weeks.

At a park next to the Minneapolis courthouse, a hush fell over a crowd of about 300 as they listened to the verdict on their cellphones. Then a great roar went up, with many people hugging, some shedding tears.

At the intersection where Floyd was pinned down, a crowd chanted, “One down, three to go!” — a reference to the three other fired Minneapolis officers facing trial in August on charges of aiding and abetting murder in Floyd's death.

Janay Henry, who lives nearby, said she felt grateful and relieved.

“I feel grounded. I can feel my feet on the concrete," she said, adding that she was looking forward to the “next case with joy and optimism and strength.”

Jamee Haggard, who brought her biracial 4-year-old daughter to the intersection, said: “There’s some form of justice that’s coming."

The verdict was read in a courthouse ringed with concrete barriers and razor wire and patrolled by National Guard troops, in a city on edge against another round of unrest — not just because of the Chauvin case but because of the deadly police shooting of a young Black man, Daunte Wright, in a Minneapolis suburb April 11.

Derek Chauvin takes the Fifth, testimony ends, closings next in trial of George Floyd's death

  Derek Chauvin takes the Fifth, testimony ends, closings next in trial of George Floyd's death When closing arguments are delivered Monday in the trial of Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd, jurors will have sat through the testimony of seven witnesses for the defense and 38 for the prosecution. But the jury did not hear from the former Minneapolis police officer.But the jury did not hear from the former Minneapolis police officer, who on Thursday removed his face covering to invoke his Fifth Amendment right not to testify.

The jurors' identities were kept secret and will not be released until the judge decides it is safe to do so.

Graphic shows the charges and verdict in the Derek Chauvin murder trial. Chauvin was found guilty on all charges in the murder of George Floyd: Derek Chauvin Charges © Provided by Associated Press Derek Chauvin Charges

It is unusual for police officers to be prosecuted for killing someone on the job. And convictions are extraordinarily rare.

Out of the thousands of deadly police shootings in the U.S. since 2005, fewer than 140 officers have been charged with murder or manslaughter, according to data maintained by Phil Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University. Before Tuesday, only seven were convicted of murder.

Juries often give police officers the benefit of the doubt when they claim they had to make split-second, life-or-death decisions. But that was not an argument Chauvin could easily make.

Floyd, 46, died May 25 after being arrested on suspicion of passing a counterfeit $20 bill for a pack of cigarettes at a corner market. He panicked, pleaded that he was claustrophobic and struggled with police when they tried to put him in a squad car. They put him on the ground instead.

The centerpiece of the case was the excruciating bystander video of Floyd gasping repeatedly, “I can’t breathe” and onlookers yelling at Chauvin to stop as the officer pressed his knee on or close to Floyd’s neck for what authorities say was 9 1/2 minutes, including several minutes after Floyd's breathing had stopped and he had no pulse.

The charges against Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd, explained

  The charges against Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd, explained What was going through Derek Chauvin's mind when he kneeled on a handcuffed, proned George Floyd for nine minutes and 29 seconds last May? That key question is at the heart of the charges against him.That key question is at the heart of the three charges against the former Minneapolis Police officer and will be top of mind for jurors when their deliberations begin. To render a verdict, they'll also have to interpret Minneapolis Police policies, Floyd's cause of death, and the specific language of the law.

Prosecutors played the footage at the earliest opportunity, during opening statements, and told the jury: “Believe your eyes.” From there it was shown over and over, analyzed one frame at a time by witnesses on both sides.

In the wake of Floyd’s death, demonstrations and scattered violence broke out in Minneapolis, around the country and beyond. The furor also led to the removal of Confederate statues and other offensive symbols such as Aunt Jemima.

In the months that followed, numerous states and cities restricted the use of force by police, revamped disciplinary systems or subjected police departments to closer oversight.

The “Blue Wall of Silence” that often protects police accused of wrongdoing crumbled after Floyd’s death. The Minneapolis police chief quickly called it “murder” and fired all four officers, and the city reached a staggering $27 million settlement with Floyd’s family as jury selection was underway.

Police-procedure experts and law enforcement veterans inside and outside the Minneapolis department, including the chief, testified for the prosecution that Chauvin used excessive force and went against his training.

Medical experts for the prosecution said Floyd died of asphyxia, or lack of oxygen, because his breathing was constricted by the way he was held down on his stomach, his hands cuffed behind him, a knee on his neck and his face jammed against the ground.

Chauvin's attorney called a police use-of-force expert and a forensic pathologist to try to make the case that Chauvin acted reasonably against a struggling suspect and that Floyd died because of a heart condition and his illegal drug use. Floyd had high blood pressure and narrowed arteries, and fentanyl and methamphetamine were found in his system.

Chauvin guilty verdict reaction, Ohio police shooting, hate crimes bill: 5 things to know Wednesday

  Chauvin guilty verdict reaction, Ohio police shooting, hate crimes bill: 5 things to know Wednesday America reacts to Derek Chauvin being found guilty of murdering George Floyd, further details expected in the Ohio police shooting of a teen and more news to start your Wednesday.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Under the law, police have certain leeway to use force and are judged according to whether their actions were “reasonable” under the circumstances.

The defense also tried to make the case that Chauvin and the other officers were hindered in their duties by what they perceived as a growing, hostile crowd.

Chauvin did not testify, and all that the jury or the public ever heard by way of an explanation from him came from a police body-camera video after an ambulance had taken the 6-foot-4, 223-pound Floyd away. Chauvin told a bystander: “We gotta control this guy ’cause he’s a sizable guy ... and it looks like he’s probably on something.”

The prosecution’s case also included tearful testimony from onlookers who said the police kept them back when they protested what was happening.

Eighteen-year-old Darnella Frazier, who shot the crucial video, said Chauvin gave the bystanders a “cold” and “heartless” stare. She and others said they felt a sense of helplessness and lingering guilt from witnessing Floyd’s slow-motion death.

“It’s been nights I stayed up, apologizing and apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more, and not physically interacting and not saving his life,” she testified.

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Webber reported from Fenton, Michigan. Associated Press video journalist Angie Wang in Atlanta and writers Doug Glass, Stephen Groves, Aaron Morrison, Tim Sullivan and Michael Tarm in Minneapolis; Mohamed Ibrahim in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota; and Todd Richmond in Madison, Wisconsin, contributed.

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Find AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd at: https://apnews.com/hub/death-of-george-floyd

DOJ weighs charging Chauvin for 2017 incident involving Black teen: Source .
Federal investigators probing Derek Chauvin's use of force against George Floyd are also weighing charging him for a 2017 incident involving a Black teen, a source said. The videos, from Sept. 4, 2017, allegedly showed Chauvin striking a Black teenager in the head so hard that the boy needed stitches, then allegedly holding the boy down with his knee for nearly 17 minutes, and allegedly ignoring complaints from the boy that he couldn't breathe.

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