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Crime Federal Grand Jury Indicts Derek Chauvin and Three Other Ex-Officers on Civil Rights Charges in George Floyd’s Death

18:06  07 may  2021
18:06  07 may  2021 Source:   lawandcrime.com

Derek Chauvin juror says trial was like 'watching somebody die on a daily basis'

  Derek Chauvin juror says trial was like 'watching somebody die on a daily basis' Brandon Mitchell, juror 52 in the trial against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, spoke to ABC News on "Good Morning America." But Mitchell, a 31-year-old basketball coach at North Community High School in Minneapolis, said he and the other 11 jurors didn't watch the news during the trial or deliberations, so they weren't aware of the racial climate or protests going on outside.

a group of people posing for the camera: Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J Alexander Kueng, and Thomas Kiernan Lane mugshots © Provided by Law & Crime Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, J Alexander Kueng, and Thomas Kiernan Lane mugshots

Minneapolis cops charged with killing George Floyd.

In the latest salvo by Attorney General Merrick Garland’s emboldened U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, ex-Minneapolis Police Officer and convicted murderer Derek Chauvin and the three other officers with him on the day George Floyd, Jr. died in custody been hit with federal civil rights charges.

Chauvin is also charged separately with another alleged civil rights abuse involving a juvenile in 2017.

Unsealed on Friday, the first indictment states that Chauvin “willfully deprived George Floyd of the right, secured and protected by the Constitution and laws of the United States, to be free from an unreasonable seizure, which includes the right to be free from the use of unreasonable force by a police officer.”

1st Derek Chauvin juror to speak out says trial was like ‘watching somebody die on a daily basis’

  1st Derek Chauvin juror to speak out says trial was like ‘watching somebody die on a daily basis’ One of the 12 jurors who convicted ex-Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd said in an interview Wednesday that being in the courtroom nearly every day for more than three weeks was like “watching somebody die on a daily basis.” © Provided by New York Daily News In this image from video, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listens as the verdict is read in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis.

“Specifically, Defendant Chauvin held his left knee across George Floyd’s neck, and his right knee on Floyd’s back and arm, as George Floyd lay on the ground, handcuffed and unresisting, and kept his knees on Floyd’s neck and body even after Floyd became unresponsive,” the grand jury charged.

Chauvin was charged separately in another indictment for allegedly holding an unnamed juvenile “by the throat” and hitting that minor “multiple times in the head with a flashlight.”

Both indictments were dated Thursday and were made public early Friday morning.

Federal prosecutors slammed Chauvin’s colleagues, Officers Tou Thao and J. Alexander Kueng, for failing to intervene.

“Specifically, Defendants Kueng and Thao were aware that Defendant Chauvin was holding his knee across George Floyd’s neck as Floyd lay handcuffed and unresisting, and that Defendant Chauvin continued to hold Floyd to the ground even after Floyd became unresponsive, and the defendants willfully failed to intervene to stop Defendant Chauvin’s use of unreasonable force,” the indictment continues.

Juror talks of deliberations before finding Chauvin guilty

  Juror talks of deliberations before finding Chauvin guilty MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A juror who was part of the unanimous vote to convict a white former Minneapolis police officer of killing George Floyd has spoken publicly about his experience. In a series of interviews, Brandon Mitchell described his experience during the nearly three-week trial. The 31-year-old basketball coach, who is Black, is the first member of the jury to speak publicly about finding Derek Chauvin guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

The final officer, Thomas Lane, is charged with “deliberate indifference” to Floyd’s medical needs. So are Chauvin, Thao and Kueng.

Chauvin’s three colleagues appeared in federal court this morning in Minnesota on Friday morning, where Thao was released on a $25,000 bond. All three continue to face state charges related to Floyd’s murder.

In the immediate wake of Chauvin’s state court murder convictions, Garland remarked that the federal criminal probe against Chauvin had been ongoing as of the day of the state court verdict. The attorney general announced a pattern-or-practice investigation of the Minneapolis Police Department the following day, examining whether the department has “potentially systemic” issues involving uses of force involving people with behavioral health disabilities and protesters.

The Justice Department revealed on Friday it is far from done with its reaction to Floyd’s death.

State, Defense Fight Over Whether Derek Chauvin Acted with ‘Particular Cruelty’ in Battle to Determine Proper Sentence

  State, Defense Fight Over Whether Derek Chauvin Acted with ‘Particular Cruelty’ in Battle to Determine Proper Sentence Minnesota prosecutors are pressing a judge to issue an "aggravated sentence" for convicted former police officer Derek Chauvin. But the defense has countered that the state is stretching the law by seeking a tougher sentence for the now convicted cop. The post State, Defense Fight Over Whether Derek Chauvin Acted with ‘Particular Cruelty’ in Battle to Determine Proper Sentence first appeared on Law & Crime.Minnesota prosecutors are pressing a judge to issue an “aggravated sentence” against Derek Chauvin.  But his defense has countered that the state is stretching the law by seeking a tougher sentence for the now-convicted former police officer.

On April 28, the same day the department indicted Ahmaud Arbery’s accused murderers for federal hate-crime charges, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported that federal prosecutors would imminently ask a grand jury to consider civil rights charges against Chauvin, Thao, Kueng, and Lane. The indictments were filed May 6.

Citing sources familiar with the discussions, the Star-Tribune reported that the investigation was originally considered to be a “contingency plan” to the state prosecution in the event of Chauvin’s full acquittal or a mistrial, upon which the officer would be arrested outside the courthouse.

“The backup plan would not be necessary,” the Star-Tribune noted when Chauvin was, indeed, convicted on state charges.

One of the sources told the paper that prosecutors would move the criminal case ahead to a grand jury for all four, despite Chauvin’s convictions.

Read the indictments below:

The post Federal Grand Jury Indicts Derek Chauvin and Three Other Ex-Officers on Civil Rights Charges in George Floyd’s Death first appeared on Law & Crime.

EXPLAINER: How will judge's ruling affect Chauvin sentence? .
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Derek Chauvin could face a much harsher prison sentence after a judge found several aggravating factors in George Floyd's death. Chauvin, 45, was convicted in April of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for pressing his knee against Floyd's neck for about 9 1/2 minutes as the Black man said he couldn't breathe. Breaking down Chauvin's potential sentence is complicated, but it starts with Minnesota statutes that call for him to be sentenced on only the most serious charge — second-degree murder, which has a maximum penalty of 40 years.

usr: 0
This is interesting!