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Crime Woman sentenced for false 911 calls sparking fatal drug raid

00:05  09 june  2021
00:05  09 june  2021 Source:   msn.com

Texas Woman Gets Prison Time for False 911 Calls That Led to Botched Drug Raid and Deaths of Neighboring Couple

  Texas Woman Gets Prison Time for False 911 Calls That Led to Botched Drug Raid and Deaths of Neighboring Couple Patricia Ann Garcia, 53, pleaded guilty in March to placing several erroneous 911 calls on Jan. 8, 2019, in which she falsely accusing her neighbors Dennis Tuttle, 59, and his wife, Rhogena Nicholas, 58, of being involved in serious criminal activity. Garcia, who reportedly had a long-running feud with the couple, told emergency operators that Tuttle and Nicholas were armed drug dealers who were holding her 25-year-old daughter in their home against her will. Just under three weeks after Garcia made the calls, narcotics officers with Houston PD executed a “no-knock warrant” on the home, breaking down the door and fatally shooting the couple.

MARTINSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA – Lisa Richardson, of Martinsburg, West Virginia, was sentenced today to 30 months of incarceration for her role in a drug conspiracy that spanned several states, Acting U.S. Attorney Randolph J. Bernard announced.

911 call taker here, we had a dude like this last night, diagnosed skitzo, called up and repeatedly rant the most irrelevant shit for hours. A call of "man threatening with a gun" is certainly going to have a strong likelihood that police in the US will detain someone with guns drawn. If the false reporter had done that herself it would be a serious crime. But those instances are in the vast minority. I'd be interested in seeing your source for this.

HOUSTON (AP) — A woman was sentenced on Tuesday to three years and four months in federal prison for making false 911 calls that ultimately resulted in a 2019 drug raid by Houston police that killed both homeowners.

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2019, file photo, police investigate the scene of a drug raid in Houston. A woman was sentenced on Tuesday, June 8, 2021, to three years and four months in federal prison for making false 911 calls that ultimately resulted in the 2019 drug raid by Houston police that killed both homeowners. Patricia Garcia was the first person to be sentenced in connection with the deadly raid in which Dennis Tuttle, 59, and his wife, Rhogena Nicholas, 58, were fatally shot on Jan. 28, 2019. (Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle via AP, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2019, file photo, police investigate the scene of a drug raid in Houston. A woman was sentenced on Tuesday, June 8, 2021, to three years and four months in federal prison for making false 911 calls that ultimately resulted in the 2019 drug raid by Houston police that killed both homeowners. Patricia Garcia was the first person to be sentenced in connection with the deadly raid in which Dennis Tuttle, 59, and his wife, Rhogena Nicholas, 58, were fatally shot on Jan. 28, 2019. (Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle via AP, File)

Patricia Garcia was the first person to be sentenced in connection with the deadly raid in which Dennis Tuttle, 59, and his wife, Rhogena Nicholas, 58, were fatally shot on Jan. 28, 2019.

Ex-Cop Pleads Guilty to Lying About Botched, Fatal Raid That Resulted in Houston Police Killing 2 People

  Ex-Cop Pleads Guilty to Lying About Botched, Fatal Raid That Resulted in Houston Police Killing 2 People A retired police officer pleaded guilty on Tuesday for lying amid a tragic, botched drug raid. Steven O. Bryant admitted he lied to help cover up for co-defendant Gerald Goines, according to the plea agreement. They are the officers implicated in the tragic, botched police raid that resulted in the deaths of Dennis Tuttle, 59, Rhogena Nicholas, 58, and their pit bull, as well as causing injuries of fellow officers. The post Ex-Cop Pleads GuiltyA retired police officer pleaded guilty on Tuesday for lying about a tragic, botched drug raid that left two dead in Houston, Texas back in 2019.

The fabricated drug deal was part of the justification for the raid , which only turned up user-level amounts of marijuana and cocaine. Garcia is charged with providing false information because she allegedly lied when she called 911 and said that she could see her daughter inside the home. As soon as the narcotics squad burst in the front door a day later, the bust erupted into gunfire. Four officers were shot, including Goines. One officer remains paralyzed from the waist down. In the days that followed, an internal investigation sparked questions about the officers’ justification for the search

Less than 48 hours after President Donald Trump called him up on a stage to express pride in the Houston Police Department, Chief Art Acevedo struggled to explain a scandal in which one of his narcotics agents allegedly lied to get a no-knock warrant for a drug -house raid that left a married couple dead and four officers shot. But an affidavit filed in Harris County District Court on Thursday by Houston internal affairs detectives investigating the raid indicates the confidential informant Goines said conducted the drug buys on his instruction claims he never even went to the house.

A dozen current and former officers tied to the narcotics unit that conducted the drug raid have been indicted in state and federal court in the wake of the shooting. Two current and former officers, Gerald Goines and Felipe Gallegos, are facing murder charges in state court.

Prosecutors have alleged Goines, who led the raid, lied to obtain the warrant to search the couple’s home by claiming a confidential informant had bought heroin there. Goines later said there was no informant and he had bought the drugs himself, they allege. Police found small amounts of marijuana and cocaine in the house, but no heroin.

FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2019 file photo, former Houston police officers Steven Bryant, foreground, and Gerald Goines, background, turn themselves in at the Civil Courthouse, in Houston.  Bryant, pleaded guilty Tuesday, June 1, 2021, to federal charges in the deaths of two homeowners killed in a 2019 drug raid, admitting he lied and obstructed the resulting investigation. (Karen Warren/Houston Chronicle via AP, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2019 file photo, former Houston police officers Steven Bryant, foreground, and Gerald Goines, background, turn themselves in at the Civil Courthouse, in Houston. Bryant, pleaded guilty Tuesday, June 1, 2021, to federal charges in the deaths of two homeowners killed in a 2019 drug raid, admitting he lied and obstructed the resulting investigation. (Karen Warren/Houston Chronicle via AP, File)

During a federal court hearing done over video Tuesday, prosecutor Alamdar Hamdani said Garcia made three 911 phone calls on the evening of Jan. 8, 2019, in which she told police her daughter was being held against her will inside the couple’s home, the couple were drug dealers and had guns inside their house.

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HOUSTON (AP) — When police fatally shot a couple during a raid of their home in a working-class Houston neighborhood, friends and family members angrily dismissed allegations that the two were selling heroin and had fired on officers while defending an illicit business. 8 from a woman who said her daughter had been doing drugs there. In a search warrant affidavit that was used to authorize the raid , Goines said that a confidential informant had bought heroin at the home. But police now allege Goines lied in the affidavit as the informant told investigators no such drug buy ever took place.

Hamdani said Garcia had no daughter and that her other claims were also false, made while she was under the influence of drugs and alcohol. Garcia had a long running dispute with the couple and the 911 calls were made to get back at them, according to authorities.

Prosecutors don’t suggest Garcia was the cause of the couple’s death 20 days later, but “that night, things were set in motion,” Hamdani said.

“Ms. Garcia dialed 911 and intended to use those three digits as a weapon,” he said.

Hamdani said that after Tuttle and Nicholas were killed, Garcia continued to not be remorseful, telling police she “was tired” of all the people who came to their neighborhood to mourn the couple’s deaths.

In a brief statement, Garcia said when she made the false 911 calls, she “wasn’t in my right mind.” In March, Garcia pleaded guilty to one count of providing false information.

“I never meant for anyone ... to die the way they did. I am so sorry for my 911 telephone calls,” Garcia said.

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Patricia Garcia, the neighbor whose 911 calls prompted the investigation of Tuttle and Nicholas, is charged with conveying false information to police. It would be easy to blame this scandal on a malicious tipster and a couple of rogue cops. But the indictment of Goines, Bryant and Garcia is also an indictment of the He calls the officers who killed Tuttle and Nicholas “heroes.” The raid prompted Acevedo to impose new restrictions on no-knock raids and belatedly required narcotics officers to wear body cameras while serving warrants. But it seems clear that more systematic reforms are required.

Shocking 911 calls capture chaos of fatal shooting at Ohio gender reveal party that 'caused pregnant woman to miscarry and left Indiana mother-of-two dead'. The chaos that gripped an Ohio neighborhood after a mass shooting at a gender reveal party on Saturday has been revealed in three chilling 911 calls . The recordings, released by Colerain Township police, capture the moments immediately following the attack by two people on a house full of celebrating locals.

Her attorney, Marjorie Meyers, had asked for a sentence of 10 to 16 months, recommended by the sentencing guidelines as Garcia has a long history of mental illness and drug abuse. Meyers said what happened to the couple was because “of rogue and corrupt police officers."

But U.S. District Judge George C. Hanks Jr. said he didn’t believe Garcia was truly remorseful and she had been callous in trying to provoke police to forcefully enter her neighbors’ home.

“There’s no question that you knew what that was going to lead to. You wanted something bad to happen,” Hanks said.

Hanks agreed with prosecutors that Garcia’s prison term should be higher than what had been recommended by the sentencing guidelines.

Last week, Steven Bryant, Goines’ former partner, pleaded guilty in federal court to one count related to obstructing justice by falsifying records. He is set to be sentenced Aug. 24.

More than 160 drug convictions tied to Goines have since been dismissed by prosecutors.

The families of Tuttle and Nicholas filed federal civil rights lawsuits against the city and 13 officers in January.

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Follow Juan A. Lozano on Twitter: https://twitter.com/juanlozano70

Wife of drug kingpin El Chapo pleads guilty to federal charges .
Emma Coronel Aispuro is being held without bond and will be sentenced in September. Prosecutor Anthony Nardozzi told the court that Coronel Aispuro "aided and abetted" the Sinaloa cartel, of which her husband was the leader, from 2011 to 2017 and, after Guzmán's arrest in Mexico, served as the "go-between" for his cartel in furtherance of its drug trafficking. Nardozzi also accused Coronel Aispuro of conspiring with Guzmán's sons to coordinate his 2015 prison break through an elaborate one-mile-long underground tunnel and of benefiting from his criminal activities through their marriage.

usr: 0
This is interesting!