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Crime Arrest made in city's oldest cold case murder thanks to genetic genealogy

23:40  09 june  2021
23:40  09 june  2021 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Arrest made in 1972 killing of 15-year-old girl thanks to genetic genealogy

  Arrest made in 1972 killing of 15-year-old girl thanks to genetic genealogy Nearly 50 years after a 15-year-old girl was stabbed to death in suburban Chicago, genetic genealogy has led to an arrest in the case. Your browser does not support this video © Naperville Police Barry Lee Whelpley, 76, was arrested on Wednesday for the July 1972 murder of 15-year-old Julie Ann Hanson in Naperville, Illinois, the Naperville Police Department said. © Naperville Police Barry Lee Whelpley, 76, of Mounds View, Minn., is pictured in an undated photo released by the Naperville Police Department in Naperville, Ill., on June 4, 2021.

An arrest has been made in a decades-old Oregon cold case murder thanks to an investigative tool known as genetic genealogy, authorities said.

Robert Plympton, now 58, was arrested on Tuesday for allegedly killing a 19-year-old college student in January 1980, according to police in Gresham.

a close up of a man wearing glasses: Robert Plympton, 58, was arrested on June 8, 2021, for the murder of 19-year-old Barbara Mae Tucker. © Multnomah County Sheriffs Office Robert Plympton, 58, was arrested on June 8, 2021, for the murder of 19-year-old Barbara Mae Tucker.

Barbara Mae Tucker was a sophomore studying business at Gresham's Mt. Hood Community College when she was sexually assaulted and beaten to death, said Gresham police.

Police arrest a suspect in an Oregon city's oldest cold case homicide with the help of DNA

  Police arrest a suspect in an Oregon city's oldest cold case homicide with the help of DNA Police in Gresham, Oregon, say a suspect in the city's oldest cold case homicide was arrested with the help of DNA technology more than 40 years since the crime. © Multnomah County Sheriff's Office Robert Plympton, 58 Authorities arrested 58-year-old Robert Plympton on Tuesday and say he's responsible for the killing of 19-year-old Barbara Mae Tucker, according to a news release from the Gresham Police Department. "For more than four decades, police were unable to clearly identify a suspect, make an arrest or charge anyone for the murder," the release said.

The teen was heading to an evening class when she was seen running onto a street from a wooded area by the edge of campus, according to police. Witnesses who were driving by later said they thought Tucker was waving and trying to get people’s attention, police said. A witness saw a man emerge from the shrubs and lead her toward campus, according to police.

a person posing for the camera © Gresham Police Dept.

A student found Tucker's body the next day, police said.

a person posing for the camera: Police provided a photo of murder victim Barbara Mae Tucker, 19, as they announced an arrest in her case, June 2021. © Gresham Police Dept. Police provided a photo of murder victim Barbara Mae Tucker, 19, as they announced an arrest in her case, June 2021.

Decades went by without identifying a suspect -- until technology advanced enough for detectives to use genetic genealogy, police said.

Through genetic genealogy, an unknown suspect's DNA left at a crime scene can be identified through his or her family members, who voluntarily submit their DNA to a genealogy database. This allows police to create a much larger family tree than if they were limited to using law enforcement databases like CODIS.

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Genetic genealogy first came to light as an investigative tool in 2018 when the "Golden State Killer" was arrested. Over 200 suspects have been identified since, according to ABC News consultant CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist whose team worked on the Barbara Tucker case.

"This devastating case has been on my mind and in my heart for years," Moore told ABC News on Wednesday.

Tucker's case is "an example of dogged determination on both the part of the detectives and through genetic genealogy," Moore said. "We started off with not much to work with, but over time were able to finally identify the suspect."

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"My heart goes out to Barbara's family and I hope this will eventually lead to resolution for them," Moore said.

Plympton, of Troutdale, Oregon, was arrested on charges including murder and rape, records show. It was not immediately clear when he is due in court.

Gresham Interim Police Chief Claudio Grandjean said the department would not comment on a potential motive.

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John Doe #1 — a possible victim of the alleged "Hog Trail Murders" serial killer — has been identified as Gerald "Jerry" Lombard, a Massachusetts man who went missing in the early 1990s . Lombard's body was discovered by authorities on February 1, 1994, after a local construction company worker reported a human body in the woods near Wyandotte Avenue and Tulip Street in northern Charlotte County. At the time, the man was given the name Joe Doe #1 when investigators were unable determine his identity or cause of death.

usr: 8
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